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By Los Angeles Times | August 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Banking Committee approved yesterday a wide-ranging reform of the nation's Depression-era financial laws, approving interstate branching, giving banks expanded powers to affiliate with securities firms and ordering a basic, low-cost bank account for people earning less than $20,000 a year.The bill was approved by a 12-9 vote and will go to the floor of the Senate -- where it faces an uncertain future -- when the body convenes next month after a summer recess. The House Banking Committee adopted a different version of the bill that would allow big industrial and commercial firms to buy banks.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 2009
WASHINGTON - The chairman of the Senate Banking Committee unveiled Tuesday his version of legislation to overhaul the nation's financial regulations, which sharply differs from the Obama administration's plan by proposing the creation of a single federal banking regulatory agency and stripping significant power from the Federal Reserve. The 1,136-page proposal by Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., is likely to be strongly opposed by the Fed and the three other bank regulatory agencies. Dodd's legislation also further complicates White House efforts to pass an overhaul by the end of the year because it differs significantly from legislation moving through the House.
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BUSINESS
By American Banker | July 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Independent Bankers Association of America has endorsed legislation to require banks to cash government checks and provide low-cost services to the poor.The community banking lobby joined forces this week with the influential American Association of Retired Persons in supporting the so-called lifeline requirement.Their joint endorsement substantially increases the likelihood that a lifeline provision will be included in the banking reform bill moving through Congress -- even though much of the rest of the industry adamantly opposes the provision.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 19, 2008
WASHINGTON - Detroit's Big Three automakers pleaded with Congress yesterday for a $25 billion lifeline to save the once-proud titans of U.S. industry, warning of a national economic catastrophe should they collapse. Millions of layoffs would follow their demise, they said, as damaging effects ripple across an already-faltering economy. The frantic bid from Detroit for help was laid bare at a packed hearing of the Senate banking committee, in which two of the three automakers said they might run out of money by the end of the year.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
The Senate banking committee is scheduled to review today a bill that would create a federal panel overseeing the accounting industry. Today, the Senate banking committee is supposed to begin the markup of the bill. That is congressional parlance for the negotiations and modifications needed to get the measure out of committee and before the full Senate. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, the Maryland Democrat who heads the committee, calls for the creation of a five-member board to oversee the outside auditors of U.S. public companies.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | September 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The board of directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., concerned about the deteriorating health of the banking system, voted yesterday to raise by more than 60 percent the deposit insurance premiums commercial banks must pay.The unanimous vote by the five-member board to raise the premiums for next year to 19.5 cents per $100 of deposits came after an FDIC report yesterday showed that the government's bank insurance fund is suffering greater...
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder | July 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Progress on sweeping bank legislation has become increasingly subject to political maneuvering in both houses of Congress, with floor action expected no sooner than September, congressional aides and banking industry sources say.House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman John Dingell remains in no rush to act on the banking reforms, and the Senate Banking Committee continues to refine the details of a bill that likely will be introduced next...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Senate agreed yesterday to take another look at the Whitewater controversy, this time with Republicans in charge.By a 96-3 vote, the Senate established a special investigative committee under the leadership of New York Sen. Alphonse M. D'Amato, an outspoken critic of the administration's handling of the Whitewater affair. Hearings could begin as early as next month.The bipartisan, Watergate-style committee is to explore an array of incidents that have spun off from the Clintons' 1978 investment in an Arkansas real estate development called Whitewater.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato of New York, who has led Republican attacks on alleged ethical breaches by President and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Whitewater case, has come under criticism himself in a government report that says he reaped one-day profits of $37,125 in a stock deal.D'Amato, chairman of a special Senate committee investigating Whitewater for the past year, was criticized in a confidential report commissioned by the Securities & Exchange Commission that was made public by U.S. District Judge Joyce Hens Green.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | February 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration's sweeping plan to overhaul the nation's banking system received a decidedly cool reception yesterday in the Senate Banking Committee, raising serious doubts about whether the full proposal can win congressional approval this year.At a hearing, both Democrats and Republicans expressed concern over President Bush's proposals to give big commercial businesses the power to buy banks, to allow banks to move fully into the business of securities and insurance, and to permit unrestricted movement by banks across state lines.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 1, 2008
WASHINGTON - Senate leaders scheduled a vote tonight on a $700 billion financial bailout package after agreeing to add tax breaks and a higher limit for insured bank deposits in a bid to attract enough votes to reverse a shocking defeat in the House and send legislation to President Bush by the weekend. After a day of behind-the-scenes maneuvering, top lawmakers said the Senate proposal would include a tax package that had been caught in a stalemate with the House, as well as a plan endorsed yesterday by both major presidential candidates and the Bush administration to raise government coverage for bank deposits.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - U.S. senators introduced a bill yesterday to create a federal regulator with the authority to sell the assets of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the event of default. The legislation also would give a new regulator the power to adjust minimum and risk-based capital standards and to disapprove new lines of business at the two government-chartered mortgage finance companies, said Sen. John E. Sununu, a New Hampshire Republican and co-sponsor of the bill. After accounting errors at Fannie Mae, the Senate Banking Committee will "have more momentum and a greater imperative for passing a bill" than last year, when it approved legislation that stalled in the Senate, Sununu said.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2002
The Senate banking committee is scheduled to review today a bill that would create a federal panel overseeing the accounting industry. Today, the Senate banking committee is supposed to begin the markup of the bill. That is congressional parlance for the negotiations and modifications needed to get the measure out of committee and before the full Senate. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, the Maryland Democrat who heads the committee, calls for the creation of a five-member board to oversee the outside auditors of U.S. public companies.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - A criminal investigation into the collapse of the Enron Corp. has been launched by the Justice Department to determine whether anyone should be prosecuted for financial maneuvers that cost employees and investors billions of dollars. A department task force headed by the criminal division, made up of federal prosecutors in Houston, San Francisco, New York and several other cities, will look into the dealings of the Texas-based energy company, which has close ties to the Bush administration.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato of New York, who has led Republican attacks on alleged ethical breaches by President and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the Whitewater case, has come under criticism himself in a government report that says he reaped one-day profits of $37,125 in a stock deal.D'Amato, chairman of a special Senate committee investigating Whitewater for the past year, was criticized in a confidential report commissioned by the Securities & Exchange Commission that was made public by U.S. District Judge Joyce Hens Green.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Senate agreed yesterday to take another look at the Whitewater controversy, this time with Republicans in charge.By a 96-3 vote, the Senate established a special investigative committee under the leadership of New York Sen. Alphonse M. D'Amato, an outspoken critic of the administration's handling of the Whitewater affair. Hearings could begin as early as next month.The bipartisan, Watergate-style committee is to explore an array of incidents that have spun off from the Clintons' 1978 investment in an Arkansas real estate development called Whitewater.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2009
WASHINGTON - The chairman of the Senate Banking Committee unveiled Tuesday his version of legislation to overhaul the nation's financial regulations, which sharply differs from the Obama administration's plan by proposing the creation of a single federal banking regulatory agency and stripping significant power from the Federal Reserve. The 1,136-page proposal by Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., is likely to be strongly opposed by the Fed and the three other bank regulatory agencies. Dodd's legislation also further complicates White House efforts to pass an overhaul by the end of the year because it differs significantly from legislation moving through the House.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 10, 1994
HOUSTON -- Republican control in Congress will mean an easier time for the Federal Reserve System in both the House and Senate, Fed Governor John P. LaWare said yesterday.The GOP sweep in Congress means "one effect will be to make it much pleasanter to go up and testify" before congressional committees, Mr. LaWare said to reporters after a speaking engagement in Houston.He cited the defeat of Sen. Jim Sasser, a Tennessee Democrat, at the polls and the decision by Democratic Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. of Michigan not to seek re-election as signaling that Fed policy-makers won't continue to face harsh criticism when they appear before the Senate Banking Committee.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- During last summer's Whitewater hearings before the Senate Banking Committee, Chairman Donald W. Riegle Jr., who is retiring after this session of Congress, talked about passing the gavel to Maryland Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, the Democrat next in line to head the prestigious committee.Not so fast, piped up the ranking Republican member, Sen. Alfonse M. D'Amato of New York, suggesting that if Republicans won control of the Senate in November, he would be the next chairman.He laughed.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 10, 1994
HOUSTON -- Republican control in Congress will mean an easier time for the Federal Reserve System in both the House and Senate, Fed Governor John P. LaWare said yesterday.The GOP sweep in Congress means "one effect will be to make it much pleasanter to go up and testify" before congressional committees, Mr. LaWare said to reporters after a speaking engagement in Houston.He cited the defeat of Sen. Jim Sasser, a Tennessee Democrat, at the polls and the decision by Democratic Sen. Donald W. Riegle Jr. of Michigan not to seek re-election as signaling that Fed policy-makers won't continue to face harsh criticism when they appear before the Senate Banking Committee.
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