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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
The Maryland Senate passed Gov. Martin O'Malley's gambling expansion bill on a 28-14 vote Friday, sending the legislation to a more closely divided House of Delegates for a decision when the the General Assembly's special session continues into a second week Monday. Approval came in the early evening after senators spent much of the afternoon debating and defeating amendments proposed by Republicans and a conservative Democrat opponent of the key provision allowing a casino in Prince George's County.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
When it comes to picking their next state senator, many Harford County voters will choose between two familiar names. The Democrat is Mary-Dulany James, a four-term state delegate whose father, William S. James, was a Maryland Senate president. The Republican is Bob Cassilly, who served on Bel Air's board of town commissioners and on the Harford County Council — and whose two brothers are also running for office in Harford this year. Both James and Cassilly believe they have the experience and vision to represent Harford's interests in Annapolis, replacing Nancy Jacobs, a Republican who is retiring after 16 years in the Senate.
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NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | January 26, 2010
Charles McC. Mathias Jr., Maryland's liberal Republican who served three terms in the U.S. Senate, where he gained enduring bipartisan respect for his conscientious approach to controversial legislation, died Monday from complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 87. Born in Frederick, Mr. Mathias retired from the Senate in 1986, ending a career on Capitol Hill that began with his election to the House of Representatives in 1960. He was elected to the Senate in 1968. Called a "maverick" Republican by some, he was a consistent supporter of organized labor, an occasional dove on defense issues and an early advocate of revitalizing the Chesapeake Bay when that was not a significant issue.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A Republican state Senate candidate from Annapolis has admitted he falsely claimed to hold a college degree, saying he hasn't yet graduated. Don Quinn, who is running against longtime Democratic Sen. John C. Astle, said he's been taking online courses from Washington State University for about four years, but is 12 credits shy of earning his degree. Quinn's LinkedIn profile and an online biography he submitted to The Baltimore Sun claim he holds a degree from Washington State.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
The Senate approved Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed expansion of early voting Monday night, sending the legislation to the House of Delegates. Senators voted 35-12, with most Republicans opposed, to increase the number of days and hours that early voting centers will remain open. The bill would increase the number of early voting days from six to eight starting in 2014. The hours of voting would be longer in presidential election years. O'Malley's proposal follows a presidential election that saw voters waiting in line for hours at the limited number of early voting sites in each county.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 13, 2011
"30 Rock" star Alec Baldwin broke down the difference between the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate the other night on David Letterman's show.  His take?  The House = "Jungle" The Senate = "Poshest golf club"  Seriously, Baldwin's impression of the genteel southern gentlemen who inhabit the Senate is quite funny. Watch below:     
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 28, 2014
Playing poker or bridge at home with cash stakes would become legal under a bill approved this week by the Senate. Though rarely enforced, it is a misdemeanor in Maryland for individuals to gamble, even in the privacy of their own homes. Sen. Nancy J. King, a Montgomery County Democrat and the bill's chief sponsor, called it a "common sense" bill that would allow family and friends to play games at home without fear of arrest or prosecution. Under the bill passed unanimously on Thursday, wagering may not be done over the Internet, and game hosts may not receive any compensation beyond whatever they might win.
NEWS
March 8, 2011
In your recent editorial on Maryland and campaign finance reform you state that in addition to the limited liability corporation (LLC) loophole, there are others sorely in need of attention ("A boost for campaign finance reform" Feb. 17). We very much appreciate Gov. Martin O'Malley's support of this bill, just as we appreciate the report done by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler on several needed campaign finance reforms. What distinguishes this major loophole from the others, and what you would not know from reading the attorney general's report, is legislation to eliminate it has passed the House of Delegates six times in the past 10 years.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
The United States Senate has voted itself a $23,200 pay raise in exchange for banning the thousands of dollars in outside speaking fees that most members pocket each year. Almost certain to become law, the raise would close the gap between the $101,900 that senators now pay themselves and the $125,100 paid to the 435 members of the House.The Evening Sun wants to know whether you approve of the pay raise for the senators.The call is local and must be made from a tone phone. The SUNDIAL number is 783-1800 or, in Anne Arundel County, 268-7736.
NEWS
May 16, 2006
Leaders often complain of the difficulty in applying order to the Senate. "Like herding cats" is a favorite description of keeping 100 independent operators in line. Far worse than senators' lack of discipline, though, is the way they collude to protect each other's prerogatives, often against what might appear to be good judgment. Rarely do they cross each other, for fear of recrimination. So perhaps it's no wonder Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist has been little more than a hapless bystander as his flock piled $14.5 billion in politically sweet but not at all necessary spending projects onto an emergency bill designed to quickly get funds to soldiers in Iraq and victims of Katrina.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
- Marylander Thomas E. Perez, who has served as secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor for a little more than a year, is now being eyed for an even more prominent position in President Barack Obama's second-term Cabinet: successor to Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. Perez, a former Maryland labor secretary and Justice Department official, is emerging as a candidate in part because of his extensive legal background but also because he has...
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Campaigns on Baltimore County's east side are still in full swing, but one outcome is already certain: For the first time in nearly half a century, voters get a new state senator. Democratic Sen. Norman Stone, who took office in 1967, is retiring from the General Assembly. Fellow Democrat John Olszewski Jr., currently a state delegate; Republican Johnny Ray Salling, a steelworker; and unaffiliated candidate Scott Collier are competing to replace him. Stone, who entered the Senate the year Spiro Agnew became governor, is its longest-serving member.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In Maryland's newly redrawn 12th legislative district - which slithers from southwestern Baltimore County to West Columbia in Howard County - the race for the State House is pretty neatly divided along county lines. All four Republicans in the race live and work in the smaller Baltimore County portion of the district, while every Democratic candidate works in the larger Howard County side, and three live there. The district's geography has the underdog GOP candidates decrying what they perceive as gerrymandering to diminish their county's voice.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Carolyn W. Colvin's nomination to lead the Social Security Administration cleared the Senate Finance Committee on Thursday, queuing up a final vote for the Maryland native later this year. The committee voted 22-2 to advance her nomination to head the Woodlawn-based agency, where she has served as acting commissioner since early last year. "Colvin has vast management experience and a steely resolve to complete successfully whatever mission she is assigned," Sen. Ben Cardin, a member of the committee, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
For more than 30 years, John Astle has walked from his downtown Annapolis home to the State House, representing his friends and neighbors in Maryland's General Assembly. He's so well-known in the capital that he's frequently stopped on the street, whether by someone just saying hello or someone offering political concerns to the longtime Democratic senator. Astle hopes to keep doing the people's work for at least four more years. Standing in his way is Republican Don Quinn, a political newcomer who is young enough to be Astle's son. As Astle works to remind voters of his experience and connections at the State House, Quinn is offering himself as a fresh new face.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
President Barack Obama laid out a sobering view of the international crises that have beset his administration this year - and tried to make the case for returning Democrats to the Senate majority - at a small gathering of political donors in Baltimore on Friday. Speaking at the home of a hedge fund manager who is among the country's foremost advocates for Israel, Obama said the Islamic State fighters who have taken over portions of Iraq and Syria have displayed "the kind of brutality that even by the standards of terrorists is extraordinary.
NEWS
March 3, 1994
By Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell's calculation, at least one-fifth of the Senate is a fraud. We think he is being modest. We would guess at least one-third of the world's greatest deliberative body is so craven, so fear-ridden, so lacking in principle and courage that it would vote to muck up the Constitution with a balanced-budget amendment that most members know is a phony.Lest Mr. Mitchell charge that we exaggerate, here is how we figure. The Senate just voted 63-37 for the proposed amendment, four votes shy of the two-thirds majority required for changing the Constitution.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Taking a hard line on the owner's responsibility for a pet's behavior, the state Senate on Thursday unanimously passed its version of a bill intended to reverse a court decision declaring pit bulls an inherently dangerous breed. Senate passage sets up a likely conflict with the House, which has taken a significantly different approach to the issue of a dog owner's liability for bites. Both versions of the bill set the same rules for all breeds, without singling out pit bulls, but the two chambers set different standards for a dog owner to avoid liability when a pet bites someone.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
As the Ravens prepared to host the Pittsburgh Steelers on Thursday night, activists and political leaders continued to question the NFL over the investigation of the team's former running back, Ray Rice, and its stance against domestic violence. Even as the NFL announced a review of its efforts to obtain video footage of Rice striking his then-fiancee, critics assailed the league's choice of former FBI director Robert S. Mueller as an investigator, citing potential conflicts of interest.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Sixteen female senators have sent a letter to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell requesting that the NFL adopt a zero-tolerance policy against domestic violence. Goodell recently instituted a policy with a six-game suspension for first-time domestic violence offenders and a lifetime ban with the possibility of reinstatement after a year for second offenses. The letter to Goodell, also sent to The Baltimore Sun, follows former Ravens running back Ray Rice being indefinitely suspended for his domestic violence incident, for which he was charged with felony aggravated assault.
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