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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Semmes Bowen & Semmes, Baltimore's fourth-largest law firm, has elected Cleaveland D. Miller, a specialist in banking and corporate law, as its chairman.Mr. Miller succeeds Geoffrey S. Mitchell, 53, who decided not to stand for re-election after a turbulent three-year term. Mr. Mitchell will return to the full-time practice of international law in the firm's Washington office.Since the 1950s, Semmes has routinely rotated partners through the chairman's post. The 107-year-old firm, which had 17 lawyers when Mr. Miller joined it in 1963, now has 140 attorneys working out of offices in Washington, Towson, Hagerstown and Wilmington, Del., in addition to Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 7, 2011
David Rogers Owen, an internationally known maritime lawyer and accomplished yachtsman, died Friday in his sleep of unknown causes at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Riderwood resident was 97. "The death of David Owen is the passing of an era. He practiced during the Golden Age of maritime law in the post-World War II years, when there were hundreds of American flagged ships and ship owners," said a nephew, Tony Whitman, a maritime lawyer with the Baltimore firm of Ober/Kaler.
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NEWS
January 24, 2008
Rita Cinnamond, a homemaker and bridge player, died of stroke complications Sunday at her Timonium home. She was 81. Born Katherine Rita Guckert in Baltimore and raised on Garrison Avenue, she attended St. Ambrose Parochial School and was a 1944 Institute of Notre Dame graduate. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree at Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington. As a young woman, she worked in a chemical analysis laboratory. In 1948, she married Thomas E. Cinnamond, a Semmes Bowen & Semmes attorney, who died last year.
NEWS
January 24, 2008
Rita Cinnamond, a homemaker and bridge player, died of stroke complications Sunday at her Timonium home. She was 81. Born Katherine Rita Guckert in Baltimore and raised on Garrison Avenue, she attended St. Ambrose Parochial School and was a 1944 Institute of Notre Dame graduate. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree at Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington. As a young woman, she worked in a chemical analysis laboratory. In 1948, she married Thomas E. Cinnamond, a Semmes Bowen & Semmes attorney, who died last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 11, 2001
The tent set up on the grounds of the Maryland SPCA was filled with dogs and cats -- and all sorts of other strange and wonderful two-legged creatures. Two-legged because these were some 250 SPCA fans of the human variety, dressed in costume for the organization's second annual "Howl-O-Ween Hop." Party co-chairs Day Bank, Victoria Valton and Linda Vinson came as Alpha Dog, Marie Antoinette (pre-guillotine), and herself, respectively. SPCA board president Randy Brinton appeared as a red Lego block, wife Hillary clicked in as his blue counterpart.
BUSINESS
By Michael Enright and Michael Enright,Special to The Sun | January 21, 1991
Very few people in Baltimore legal circles would argue that women and minority hiring ratios in the city's biggest law firms have improved over the last five years. Disagreements arise when the discussion turns to whether things are improving fast enough."Improved, or gotten better, are relative terms when you talking about minority hirings," said one local black attorney who asked not to be identified. "Five years ago, there were no black partners in the big firms. Today there are maybe a dozen.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
A former associate at the large Baltimore law firm, Semmes Bowen & Semmes, charges in a federal lawsuit that she was passed over for promotion to partner because she is a woman.In the complaint, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Janet M. Truhe, 33, of Catonsville says that she was denied promotion despite performing better than did some male lawyers who were elevated to partner at the 141-attorney firm.Ms. Truhe's suit, which seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages, also portrays the work atmosphere at Semmes as "sexually discriminatory."
BUSINESS
November 15, 1993
New positions* Black & Decker Corp. named Joseph Galli, formerly of U.S. Power Tools, president of its North American Power Tools group, based in Towson.* Sowers Printing Co. announced that David L. Horst has been elected president and chief operating officer for the Lebanon, Pa.-based company.* Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland announced that Debbie Holloway has been elected to the Baltimore Regional Burn Center Foundation board of directors.* Health Design Group has announced that Greg Walton joined the Baltimore-based corporate and health care design specialists as an associate.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
At the wedding of Angelique A. Pefinis and Joel Newport, guest Ben Wattenberg had trouble keeping his professional cool. The wedding was too much fun. "He was so excited, he must have kissed me five times!" Ms. Pefinis-Newport says.The wedding, which took place in Baltimore in November 1990, is featured in "The First Universal Nation," tonight's episode of "Ben Wattenberg: Trends in the Nineties" at 10 on Maryland Public Television (Channels 22 and 67.)The inter-religious marriage of Ms. Pefinis-Newport, one of three daughters born to a Greek family with close ties to the Greek Orthodox church, and her husband, a Presbyterian whose ancestors arrived on the Mayflower, is indicative of America's increasingly mixed cultural heritage, Mr. Wattenberg says in the program.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | October 31, 1992
The Board of Regents of the University of Maryland system dealt a blow to the state's chain drug stores yesterday as it voted to require an extra year of study for an entry-level pharmacy degree.The vote on the controversial proposal to stop the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Pharmacy from awarding five-year bachelor of science (B.S.) degrees in pharmacy was 8-4, with 1 abstention and three regents absent.The decision gave the pharmacy school the green light to push forward next fall with its plan to award only the six-year doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Seven nominated for judgeships Seven lawyers, including a former judge, a former Republican Anne Arundel County Council member and several current and former prosecutors, were nominated last week to fill the two open judgeships on the Anne Arundel County District Court. The Judicial Nominating Commission forwarded their names to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., winnowing the list from a record 31 applications. Ehrlich must choose from these nominees: David S. Bruce, a former District Court judge who was appointed to the Circuit Court but lost that post in an election a year ago. James Arthur Johnson, a principal with Baltimore law firm of Semmes Bowen & Semmes who specializes in business-oriented disputes and stockholder litigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 11, 2001
The tent set up on the grounds of the Maryland SPCA was filled with dogs and cats -- and all sorts of other strange and wonderful two-legged creatures. Two-legged because these were some 250 SPCA fans of the human variety, dressed in costume for the organization's second annual "Howl-O-Ween Hop." Party co-chairs Day Bank, Victoria Valton and Linda Vinson came as Alpha Dog, Marie Antoinette (pre-guillotine), and herself, respectively. SPCA board president Randy Brinton appeared as a red Lego block, wife Hillary clicked in as his blue counterpart.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Moving to mesh legal and lobbying practices, the Baltimore law firm Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP and former Baltimore County Executive Dennis Rasmussen said yesterday that they will form a government relations joint venture.By creating the Rasmussen Whiteford Public Affairs Group LLC, the law firm and the Towson-based Rasmussen Group said they would be able to offer a broader array of services to clients of both firms."We do lobbying work, but it is a tremendously difficult task," said Albert J. Mezzanotte Jr., a member of Whiteford, Taylor's management committee.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 22, 1996
AMONG THE NEW players in the Clinton administration is a revamped economic and trade team. Chicago political aide William M. Daley, who was key in helping Clinton get congressional approval for the North American Free Trade Agreement, is the new commerce secretary. He replaces Mickey Kantor, who came aboard after Ron Brown was killed this year.Gene Sperling was the dark horse named to head the National Economic Council, which was started by Clinton to coordinate national and domestic economic policy.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
Thomas J. S. Waxter Jr., a former Baltimore City councilman, has won a long-coveted appointment to the city's Circuit Court, the governor's office announced yesterday.Waxter, a partner in the law firm of Semmes Bowen & Semmes, was named to the seat formerly held by Circuit Judge David Ross, who retired.Gov. Parris N. Glendening cited Waxter's "distinguished professional record in both the private and public sectors."The selection of Waxter, 62, came on a day when the governor's office announced four judicial appointments, including that of the first woman to be named to a judgeship on the Eastern Shore.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Horn | July 10, 1994
Last week, four of the regional Bell telephone companies filed a court motion to overturn the consent decree that has governed their actions since the breakup of the Bell system a decade ago. Administered by U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene, the decree prevents the seven Baby Bells from offering long distance service, manufacturing telecommunications servicesand, the Bells contend, prevents them from moving fully into information services.With the court action, the Bells are pursuing two paths to overturn the decree: one in the courts and one in Congress.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
A former associate at the large Baltimore law firm of Semmes Bowen & Semmes charges in a federal lawsuit that she was passed over for promotion to partner because she is a woman.In the complaint, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Janet M. Truhe, 33, of Catonsville says that she was denied promotion despite performing better than some male lawyers who were elevated to partner at the 141-attorney firm.Ms. Truhe's suit, which seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages, also portrays the work atmosphere at Semmes as "sexually discriminatory."
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Moving to mesh legal and lobbying practices, the Baltimore law firm Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP and former Baltimore County Executive Dennis Rasmussen said yesterday that they will form a government relations joint venture.By creating the Rasmussen Whiteford Public Affairs Group LLC, the law firm and the Towson-based Rasmussen Group said they would be able to offer a broader array of services to clients of both firms."We do lobbying work, but it is a tremendously difficult task," said Albert J. Mezzanotte Jr., a member of Whiteford, Taylor's management committee.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Semmes Bowen & Semmes, Baltimore's fourth-largest law firm, has elected Cleaveland D. Miller, a specialist in banking and corporate law, as its chairman.Mr. Miller succeeds Geoffrey S. Mitchell, 53, who decided not to stand for re-election after a turbulent three-year term. Mr. Mitchell will return to the full-time practice of international law in the firm's Washington office.Since the 1950s, Semmes has routinely rotated partners through the chairman's post. The 107-year-old firm, which had 17 lawyers when Mr. Miller joined it in 1963, now has 140 attorneys working out of offices in Washington, Towson, Hagerstown and Wilmington, Del., in addition to Baltimore.
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