Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSemisweet Chocolate
IN THE NEWS

Semisweet Chocolate

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Jeanmarie Brownson and Jeanmarie Brownson,Chicago Tribune | January 22, 1992
We think there are few better ways to warm up than by wrapping your hands around a mug filled with a tasty, hot concoction.Double Hot Chocolate8 ounces semisweet chocolateLarge chunk of white chocolate1/4 cup whipping cream, whipped4 cups milk1/4 cup liqueur, such as coffee-flavored liqueur, peppermint schnapps, optionalChop semisweet chocolate very finely. Make white chocolate curls by using a vegetable peeler along one side of the chunk of white chocolate. Set curls aside. Whip cream until soft peaks form.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Mendell and Erin Mendell,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2004
Luscious Chocolate Desserts ($19.95, Chronicle Books, 2004) is for the chocolate enthusiast. There is an excellent recipe for brownies (Katharine Hepburn's, no less), and recipes for basic cakes and cookies, but the book is set apart by its instruction in the finer nuances of chocolate. There is a history of chocolate, a section on how chocolate is made, instruction on how to make chocolate using cocoa nibs and advice on how to taste chocolate. The recipes include a Chocolate Panna Cotta that is rich without being overly sweet and a dark-chocolate tart that lives up to its billing as "perfectly simple."
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | June 16, 1991
From your white wicker chair on a balcony of Mohonk Mountain House, a sprawling Gothic fairy tale of a place in upstate New York, you can nibble griddle cakes, gaze at a stupefyingly sapphire lake, and learn to love mornings again.Frost with chocolate buttercream. Glaze with Sacher glaze.Chocolate buttercreamMakes 3 pounds.1 pound, 4 ounces (2 1/2 cups) unsalted butter4 cups confectioners' sugar1 1/2 cups vegetable shortening1 cup cream fondant (see note)1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract8 ounces semisweet chocolate chips, melted2 to 3 ounces warm waterIn a large mixer bowl, beat butter and sugar well.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Food Editor | November 3, 2004
A new combo: chocolate and cranberries Chocolate and raspberry are a classic combination, but now that November has arrived, try a more seasonal variation on the theme by pairing chocolate with cranberries. Here's a rich fudge-cake recipe from Ocean Spray: Heat oven to 325 degrees. Line an 8-inch round cake pan with foil. Coat foil with cooking spray. Dust pan with flour, tapping to remove excess. Combine 2/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips, 1/2 cup butter and 1 ounce unsweetened chocolate in a microwavesafe bowl and microwave on high for 1 minute.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | October 28, 1992
These cookies have no redeeming social value. They ignore the current trends: They're high in fat, low in fiber, and they're not cheap. Who cares?In an age when the catch phrase is "no more than," we decided to be contrary and offer recipes with this tagline: "at least."Each recipe is guaranteed to deliver a handful of comfort -- with 150 calories, minimum. Add to that a glass of milk -- whole, in the spirit of excess -- and life is good.bake fudge browniesMakes 16 brownies.12 ounces semisweet chocolate1 (14-ounce)
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
With all the emphasis on health, nutrition and low-calorie eating, you might think that sumptuous chocolate desserts are out of favor for Valentine's Day. Banish the thought. A sweet and sentimental gift of food is always appreciated. "When you want to cook something that says 'I love you,' you're more likely to make the point with a dessert than with pot roast," said Regan Daley, author of the best-selling cookbook The Sweet Kitchen (Artisan, 2001). "People have a very direct emotional connection to sweets.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 14, 1999
I AM A MAN WHO LOVES too much, who loses all sense of moderation, at least when it comes to pie. Take this Chocolate Pecan Chocolate Chunk Pie. It is too much. It is too much work. There is always too much pie filling to fit into one pie shell. So you end up making either two small pies, or one and half big pies.But it tastes so good. It gives you so much pleasure that you put up with all the trouble it causes. That is why it is a perfect pie for Valentine's Day. It is a labor of love.Chocolate Pecan Chocolate Chunk PieMakes 2 small pies or 1 1/2 big piesDOUGH1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour6 tablespoons unsalted butter cut into 1-tablespoon pieces1 tablespoon granulated sugarpinch of salt1/4 cup ice waterFILLING1/4 pound unsalted butter1/2 cup granulated sugar12 ounces semisweet chocolate chopped into 1/4 -inch pieces2 ounces unsweetened chocolate chopped into 1/4 -inch pieces1 1/2 cups dark corn syrup1 tablespoon vanilla extract1/4 teaspoon salt8 eggs3 cups pecan halvesTo prepare the pie shell, mix 1 1/4 cups flour, butter, sugar and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
Barbara S. Schubert of Ellicott City is seeking a recipe called Need'ems. She says: "I bought some at a craft and baked goods fair in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, and knew immediately it was the appropriate title for this scrumptiously delicious sweet treat. It was a square of semisweet chocolate with a creamy filling. Please help me locate this recipe as I now know my taste buds Need'em." Goldie Brody of Baltimore responded with a recipe "from a cookbook titled Damariscotta Kitchens -- Favorite Recipes From Historic Lincoln County, Maine."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | April 1, 1998
A zebra cheesecake was the request sent in by Rich Kudzin of Hudson, Ill. "Don't get confused with the recipe for a marble cheesecake because it is not the one," he wrote. The chosen response came from Paula Merkle of Baltimore, who noted, "I cut this out of Good Housekeeping (December 1990). It is great.Ruth D. Mullinix of Baldwin requested "a tomato aspic recipe similar to the one served at the Woman's Industrial Exchange in Baltimore." Her response came from Beth Hunter of Timonium, who pointed out that "this is one of my favorite foods, but an affinity not shared by my family.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 26, 1997
Several days ago I started looking for a simple recipe for a sweet confection. I went through my files but could not find any dish that suited my needs. Then I remembered a delectable nibble I had savored in France last summer. At an outdoor food market, I bought some chocolate-coated walnut halves. A local merchant was offering samples, and after one taste I bought several bags. I decided to try to reproduce the delicious morsels. One of my assistants and I spent the afternoon testing various versions, and late in the day decided that we had arrived at a close facsimile of the original.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | March 21, 2004
Cupcakes are standard fare for bake sales and kid's parties, but dress them up with lemon curd, fruit, and nuts and they're ready for grown-up celebrations as well. While we usually think of cupcakes as small, dome-shaped cakes covered with icing, cupcakes lend themselves to a variety of creative shapes. Bake the batter into colorful ice cream cones and give your guests a sweet surprise. Cut the tops off and arrange slices into the shapes of butterfly wings for elegant spring parties. Or make up a batch of mini cupcakes with a swirl of colorful frosting.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | December 14, 2003
At our home we have a small Christmas gathering, but I love having food that is ready and waiting when company arrives. Creamy soups that can be simmered to perfection days beforehand are often first-course choices. Accompaniments such as potato gratins or roasted vegetables, both of which can be cooked ahead and reheated at serving time, are also favorites. Whether the entree is ham, turkey or fillet of beef, I often pair it with a spicy chutney or savory relish prepared earlier. But desserts, I think, lend themselves most easily to advance assembly.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
Anne O'Neill of Bel Air requested a French chocolate coffeecake recipe. She wrote, "It had yeast, melted chocolate chips and cinnamon. The dough was rolled out jellyroll style, filled with chocolate and put in a tube pan and covered with a crumbly topping. I'd love to find this lost recipe." Beverly Kohn of Owings Mills responded. "Enclosed is the recipe I think Anne O'Neill is looking for. It was in House & Gardens magazine in April 1971. I have made it many times, and sometimes I use cinnamon and brown sugar and butter instead of the chocolate chips.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 1, 2002
This past week I decided that decadent Chocolate Praline Truffles would be the newest entry to my repertoire. I am crazy about praline, which is a crunchy combination of nuts and caramelized sugar. Praline (the name also refers to the round, patty-shaped candy made with pecans from Louisiana) is neither difficult nor time-consuming to make. Nuts and sugar are heated together in a saucepan until the sugar dissolves and turns brown or caramelizes. Then the mixture is spread out on an oiled surface to cool and harden.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
With all the emphasis on health, nutrition and low-calorie eating, you might think that sumptuous chocolate desserts are out of favor for Valentine's Day. Banish the thought. A sweet and sentimental gift of food is always appreciated. "When you want to cook something that says 'I love you,' you're more likely to make the point with a dessert than with pot roast," said Regan Daley, author of the best-selling cookbook The Sweet Kitchen (Artisan, 2001). "People have a very direct emotional connection to sweets.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2002
No one who knows me would suggest that I have an addictive personality, but there is one substance I regularly abuse. Chocolate is my secret obsession. Rarely does a day go by that I don't sneak into our kitchen and treat myself to a chocolate confection. And, when entertaining, more often than not, a chocolate inspiration ends my menus. Naturally, I look forward to Valentine's Day, the day when this ingredient is celebrated, and my passion can be made public. Although my husband and I often go out for dinner on that evening, I always have a homemade chocolate dessert waiting for us at home.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 31, 1999
Ask me to name my favorite flavor in the world, and without even pausing, my response would be chocolate. Like countless others, I am a confirmed chocoholic.Hardly a day passes that I don't indulge in some type of chocolate confection. My habit, however, brings with it guilt; while nibbling, I subconsciously remind myself of the calories and fat grams these morsels contain. At only one time of the year do I luxuriate in rich chocolate creations with no concern, and that, of course, is on Valentine's Day.Every winter as this holiday approaches, I look forward to preparing a chocolate dessert for Feb. 14. My husband and I often eat out on this date, but I still like to have something chocolate waiting at home.
FEATURES
By Beth Hillson and Beth Hillson,Contributing Writer | October 28, 1992
There are many wonderful flavors of ice cream and frozen yogurt for sale. Instead of Cherry Garcia, you may want to try another good quality frozen yogurt. Strawberry or raspberry frozen yogurt is delicious with the chocolate and walnuts in this recipe, but you could make up your own combination. You could also use your favorite cherry, strawberry or raspberry ice cream for a richer dessert. Even young cooks can do this one as long as someone helps them to read the instructions. A word of caution: Don't forget the frozen yogurt when it's softening in the refrigerator.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
Barbara S. Schubert of Ellicott City is seeking a recipe called Need'ems. She says: "I bought some at a craft and baked goods fair in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, and knew immediately it was the appropriate title for this scrumptiously delicious sweet treat. It was a square of semisweet chocolate with a creamy filling. Please help me locate this recipe as I now know my taste buds Need'em." Goldie Brody of Baltimore responded with a recipe "from a cookbook titled Damariscotta Kitchens -- Favorite Recipes From Historic Lincoln County, Maine."
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2001
Recently I held a meeting for my investment club. All novices who work in other fields, we get together once a month for lectures and discussions on investing, but we love socializing as well. So our gatherings begin with appetizers or even a light supper and lots of conversation. At our first fall meeting, I opted to serve a simple meal. The menu included egg and olive salad club sandwiches garnished with potato chips and deli pickles. There was also a plate of sliced red and yellow tomatoes drizzled with vinaigrette dressing and sprinkled with bits of creamy goat cheese.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.