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By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
The Seminole Tribe of Florida, under fire from the IRS for building two hotel-casino complexes with tax-exempt bonds, is refinancing the projects with taxable bonds and trying to sever its ties with the developer and financial adviser who initiated the deal - Baltimore's David S. Cordish. The Seminoles say their decision to seek a buyout of Cordish's contract was based not on their tax problems but on the wild success of the two casinos that Cordish built for them, which seem certain to pay him - and the tribe - more money than they apparently anticipated.
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NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun Reporter | March 7, 2007
A pending settlement that would end the Indian casino partnership between the Cordish Co. and the Seminole Tribe of Florida will result in the Baltimore development firm and its partners earning roughly $1.3 billion from the deal. Cordish built the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino complexes in Tampa, Fla., and Hollywood, Fla., but fell out of favor with the tribe soon after the casinos opened in 2004. Each side has sued the other over matters related to the deal - a development project that company President David S. Cordish once called his "proudest accomplishment" - but those lawsuits are now expected to end. Even as it collapses, the contract has garnered Cordish subsidiary Power Plant Entertainment one of the largest development fees in the history of Indian gaming.
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NEWS
By Robert Little and Mike Adams and Robert Little and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 14, 2004
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. - The peaks and depths of James E. Billie's life are evident in the hardened creases of his nine fingers. He wielded astonishing power during his 22 years as chief of the Seminole Tribe of Florida - nose-diving in the tribe's private jets, touring with his band and building the Seminoles into one of the most influential and flamboyant tribes in America. Billie's other finger, a small remittance for his lifestyle, was bitten off while wrestling alligators at the tribe's safari park in the Everglades.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
NATIONAL GOP assails Jefferson search Republican congressional leaders rose to the defense of a Democratic congressman under investigation for possible bribery, accusing the Justice Department of improperly searching William Jefferson's Capitol Hill office. pg 3a Lloyd Bentsen dies at 85 Former Senator and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the courtly Texan who famously put down vice-presidential rival Dan Quayle in a 1988 debate by telling him, "You're no Jack Kennedy," has died. He was 85. pg 4a MARYLAND Sniper master plan detailed Had they not been arrested, Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad would have claimed another sniper victim that day and begun a frightening master plan with Baltimore as the hub of a murderous campaign to use explosives against mourners at a police officers funeral and busloads of schoolchildren, Malvo testified yesterday at Muhammad's murder trial.
BUSINESS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
The Seminole Tribe of Florida is suing to overturn its casino gambling contract with Baltimore developer David S. Cordish, saying his company will earn as much as $2.2 billion over 10 years for developing the tribe's two Hard Rock Hotel and Casino complexes despite taking on virtually no financial risk and "doing absolutely nothing" once the casinos opened in 2004. In a lawsuit filed in Broward County Circuit Court in Florida, the Seminoles call their deal with Cordish "illegal and unconscionable," and say it violates a federal law prohibiting non-Indians from acquiring a "proprietary interest" in tribal gambling operations.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun Reporter | March 7, 2007
A pending settlement that would end the Indian casino partnership between the Cordish Co. and the Seminole Tribe of Florida will result in the Baltimore development firm and its partners earning roughly $1.3 billion from the deal. Cordish built the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino complexes in Tampa, Fla., and Hollywood, Fla., but fell out of favor with the tribe soon after the casinos opened in 2004. Each side has sued the other over matters related to the deal - a development project that company President David S. Cordish once called his "proudest accomplishment" - but those lawsuits are now expected to end. Even as it collapses, the contract has garnered Cordish subsidiary Power Plant Entertainment one of the largest development fees in the history of Indian gaming.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
Seminoles will be welcome at NCAA tournaments after all. The NCAA yesterday removed Florida State University from the list of 18 schools that were banned from using American Indian mascots, nicknames and imagery in national championship events. When that prohibition was announced three weeks ago, FSU administrators immediately denounced it and threatened to sue. Florida State was the first university to appeal the matter to the NCAA, and at least one other school will follow its lead. "This is an outcome one would expect reasonable people to reach," Florida State athletic director Dave Hart said.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2001
The Cordish Co., known for redevelopment projects in the Inner Harbor and elsewhere, is gambling on something new. It is the developer of a $300 million Seminole Indian project in Florida that includes a hotel, shops and possibly the state's largest casino. The Baltimore developer broke ground yesterday for the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Resort in Hollywood, which is scheduled to open in the fall next year on the Seminole reservation. Cordish is also the developer of a second, $100 million facility planned on a Seminole reservation in Tampa.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 7, 2004
The Internal Revenue Service has made a "preliminary adverse determination" that the tax-exempt bond deal Baltimore developer David S. Cordish arranged to finance two hotel-casino complexes for the Seminole Tribe of Florida is invalid and that the bonds are subject to federal taxes. The determination - the first significant word from the IRS since it launched an investigation of the deal in April - could let the federal government strip the project of a $233 million subsidy and collect that sum in taxes or penalties.
NEWS
May 24, 2006
NATIONAL GOP assails Jefferson search Republican congressional leaders rose to the defense of a Democratic congressman under investigation for possible bribery, accusing the Justice Department of improperly searching William Jefferson's Capitol Hill office. pg 3a Lloyd Bentsen dies at 85 Former Senator and Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, the courtly Texan who famously put down vice-presidential rival Dan Quayle in a 1988 debate by telling him, "You're no Jack Kennedy," has died. He was 85. pg 4a MARYLAND Sniper master plan detailed Had they not been arrested, Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad would have claimed another sniper victim that day and begun a frightening master plan with Baltimore as the hub of a murderous campaign to use explosives against mourners at a police officers funeral and busloads of schoolchildren, Malvo testified yesterday at Muhammad's murder trial.
BUSINESS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | May 24, 2006
The Seminole Tribe of Florida is suing to overturn its casino gambling contract with Baltimore developer David S. Cordish, saying his company will earn as much as $2.2 billion over 10 years for developing the tribe's two Hard Rock Hotel and Casino complexes despite taking on virtually no financial risk and "doing absolutely nothing" once the casinos opened in 2004. In a lawsuit filed in Broward County Circuit Court in Florida, the Seminoles call their deal with Cordish "illegal and unconscionable," and say it violates a federal law prohibiting non-Indians from acquiring a "proprietary interest" in tribal gambling operations.
NEWS
By ROBERT LITTLE and ROBERT LITTLE,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
The Seminole Tribe of Florida, under fire from the IRS for building two hotel-casino complexes with tax-exempt bonds, is refinancing the projects with taxable bonds and trying to sever its ties with the developer and financial adviser who initiated the deal - Baltimore's David S. Cordish. The Seminoles say their decision to seek a buyout of Cordish's contract was based not on their tax problems but on the wild success of the two casinos that Cordish built for them, which seem certain to pay him - and the tribe - more money than they apparently anticipated.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
Seminoles will be welcome at NCAA tournaments after all. The NCAA yesterday removed Florida State University from the list of 18 schools that were banned from using American Indian mascots, nicknames and imagery in national championship events. When that prohibition was announced three weeks ago, FSU administrators immediately denounced it and threatened to sue. Florida State was the first university to appeal the matter to the NCAA, and at least one other school will follow its lead. "This is an outcome one would expect reasonable people to reach," Florida State athletic director Dave Hart said.
NEWS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
Wearing a flowing headdress of turkey feathers and authentic Sioux garb, Chief Illiniwek has been a halftime tradition at the home basketball court of the University of Illinois Fighting Illini, performing his ceremonial dance. But if the national runners-up return to the NCAA tournament in March, the chief won't be there. Nor will any other mascots with an American Indian theme. The NCAA banned yesterday the use of American Indian mascots and nicknames during its postseason tournaments, a rule that affects Illinois and 17 other schools.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 7, 2004
The Internal Revenue Service has made a "preliminary adverse determination" that the tax-exempt bond deal Baltimore developer David S. Cordish arranged to finance two hotel-casino complexes for the Seminole Tribe of Florida is invalid and that the bonds are subject to federal taxes. The determination - the first significant word from the IRS since it launched an investigation of the deal in April - could let the federal government strip the project of a $233 million subsidy and collect that sum in taxes or penalties.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
The Internal Revenue Service says Baltimore developer David S. Cordish's $455 million deal to build two hotel-casino projects for the Seminole Tribe of Florida appears to violate federal tax law, and has ordered an investigation into the use of tax-exempt bonds to finance the enterprise. The agency is also exploring the initial fees paid to Cordish and other brokers of the deal, suggesting that the payments to private businesses are inappropriately high for a tax-exempt financing that is meant to benefit only "essential governmental functions."
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
The Internal Revenue Service says Baltimore developer David S. Cordish's $455 million deal to build two hotel-casino projects for the Seminole Tribe of Florida appears to violate federal tax law, and has ordered an investigation into the use of tax-exempt bonds to finance the enterprise. The agency is also exploring the initial fees paid to Cordish and other brokers of the deal, suggesting that the payments to private businesses are inappropriately high for a tax-exempt financing that is meant to benefit only "essential governmental functions."
NEWS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
Wearing a flowing headdress of turkey feathers and authentic Sioux garb, Chief Illiniwek has been a halftime tradition at the home basketball court of the University of Illinois Fighting Illini, performing his ceremonial dance. But if the national runners-up return to the NCAA tournament in March, the chief won't be there. Nor will any other mascots with an American Indian theme. The NCAA banned yesterday the use of American Indian mascots and nicknames during its postseason tournaments, a rule that affects Illinois and 17 other schools.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Mike Adams and Robert Little and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 14, 2004
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. - The peaks and depths of James E. Billie's life are evident in the hardened creases of his nine fingers. He wielded astonishing power during his 22 years as chief of the Seminole Tribe of Florida - nose-diving in the tribe's private jets, touring with his band and building the Seminoles into one of the most influential and flamboyant tribes in America. Billie's other finger, a small remittance for his lifestyle, was bitten off while wrestling alligators at the tribe's safari park in the Everglades.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2001
The Cordish Co., known for redevelopment projects in the Inner Harbor and elsewhere, is gambling on something new. It is the developer of a $300 million Seminole Indian project in Florida that includes a hotel, shops and possibly the state's largest casino. The Baltimore developer broke ground yesterday for the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Resort in Hollywood, which is scheduled to open in the fall next year on the Seminole reservation. Cordish is also the developer of a second, $100 million facility planned on a Seminole reservation in Tampa.
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