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NEWS
October 18, 2001
Oct. 27-28 Maryland: "The Battlefield Embalmer: Preserving the Civil War Dead," a discussion at National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Historian James W. Lowry will discuss mortuary science during the war. For more information, call the museum at 301-695-1864. Nov. 2-Nov. 3 Pennsylvania: The Seminary Ridge Symposium will present "Battle: the Nature and Consequences of Civil War Combat," at Seminary Ridge, Gettysburg. Sponsored by the Seminary Ridge Historic Preservation Foundation.
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NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
While the annual Gettysburg battle re-enactment always provides a great deal of action and excitement, it also serves to support preservation around the area. Every year, the Gettysburg Anniversary Committee chooses a number of different organizations to support. The 141st Gettysburg Re-enactment, which took place last summer, was no different. One of the organizations supported by the re-enactment was the National Trust for Historic Gettysburg. According to the Annual Gettysburg Civil War Battle Re-enactment Web site, the National Trust is involved in a number of restoration efforts around Gettysburg.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
The dawning of the third day at Gettysburg found the Confederate troops still occupying Seminary Ridge while the Union army was stretched from Little Round Top on the left in a fishhook to Culp's Hill on the right.Gen. Robert E. Lee still thought he could break through the federal line and ordered up the division of Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's 1st Corps, which had been left the previous day at Chambersburg, Pa., to guard the Confederate supply trains.Longstreet, who preferred the strategy of taking strong defensive positions and waiting for the enemy to attack, opposed Lee's plan to attack the Union line straight on. Longstreet writes in his account of Gettysburg in "Battles and Leaders of the Civil War" that he told Lee he thought the wisest course was to move around the Union left, find good defensive ground and wait for the Union army to attack.
NEWS
June 23, 2002
June 30 11 a.m.: Union Brig. Gen. John Buford's 1st Cavalry Division arrives in Gettysburg. 11.15 a.m.: Confederate Brig. Gen. James J. Pettigrew's brigade of Maj. Gen. Henry Heth's division runs into the Union cavalry at McPherson's Ridge and retreats to Cashtown; Buford reports the encounter to Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the Union army's 1st Corps. Late afternoon: Heth requests permission from Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill, commander of the 3rd Corps, to advance to Gettysburg the next morning.
NEWS
June 23, 2002
June 30 11 a.m.: Union Brig. Gen. John Buford's 1st Cavalry Division arrives in Gettysburg. 11.15 a.m.: Confederate Brig. Gen. James J. Pettigrew's brigade of Maj. Gen. Henry Heth's division runs into the Union cavalry at McPherson's Ridge and retreats to Cashtown; Buford reports the encounter to Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the Union army's 1st Corps. Late afternoon: Heth requests permission from Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill, commander of the 3rd Corps, to advance to Gettysburg the next morning.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 1994
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- It is the ground that Lincoln said words could not hallow, the rolling fields and ridges of the farm town that became the central battlefield of the most searing conflict in U.S. history. Now a battle over the loss of part of that ground has drawn the scrutiny of Congress after riling Civil War experts and pitting townspeople against each other.The controversy has been brewing for years, the outgrowth of a long-running debate over just how much land should be set aside in this shrine to the thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the first three days of July 1863.
NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
While the annual Gettysburg battle re-enactment always provides a great deal of action and excitement, it also serves to support preservation around the area. Every year, the Gettysburg Anniversary Committee chooses a number of different organizations to support. The 141st Gettysburg Re-enactment, which took place last summer, was no different. One of the organizations supported by the re-enactment was the National Trust for Historic Gettysburg. According to the Annual Gettysburg Civil War Battle Re-enactment Web site, the National Trust is involved in a number of restoration efforts around Gettysburg.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
On October 22, 2003 REVEREND PAUL MICHAEL ORSO of Gwynn Oak, formerly of Millersville; beloved husband of Joan W. Orso and the late Kathryn W. Orso; devoted father of Donald Orso and Carolyn Bertelsmeyer; dear brother of Max Orso. Also survived by nine grandchildren. Friends may call at Our Shepard Lutheran Church, Severna Park, on Thursday 10 to 11 A.M. with a memorial service at 11 A.M. Memorial contributions may be made to the Rev. Paul M. Orso, PHD, Scholarship Fund, 61 Seminary Ridge, Gettysburg, PA 17325.
NEWS
February 25, 2004
On February 22, 2004, REV. WILLIAM J. YINGLING, beloved husband of Ruth E. Yingling, devoted father of John E. Yingling, William Hotz, Jr., Sue Mackay, John G. Hotz and the late Marilyn R. Wheeler, caring brother of Ruth Wilkins, cherished grandfather of 9 and great grandfather of 2. Friends may call at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories - Parkville Tuesday 6-8 PM and Wednesday 2-4 & 6-8 PM. A funeral service will be held 11AM Thursday at St....
TRAVEL
June 13, 2010
Gettysburg Festival Where: Gettysburg, Pa. When: June 18-27 What: A 10-day celebration that combines diverse art forms while incorporating the historic backdrop of Gettysburg. The festival features live music, food, theater and art, with dozens of culinary, musical and artistic events scattered throughout the small town during the 10-day event. The festival kicks off with a live taping of the NPR classical music show "From the Top" with host Christopher O'Riley.
NEWS
October 18, 2001
Oct. 27-28 Maryland: "The Battlefield Embalmer: Preserving the Civil War Dead," a discussion at National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Historian James W. Lowry will discuss mortuary science during the war. For more information, call the museum at 301-695-1864. Nov. 2-Nov. 3 Pennsylvania: The Seminary Ridge Symposium will present "Battle: the Nature and Consequences of Civil War Combat," at Seminary Ridge, Gettysburg. Sponsored by the Seminary Ridge Historic Preservation Foundation.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
The dawning of the third day at Gettysburg found the Confederate troops still occupying Seminary Ridge while the Union army was stretched from Little Round Top on the left in a fishhook to Culp's Hill on the right.Gen. Robert E. Lee still thought he could break through the federal line and ordered up the division of Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet's 1st Corps, which had been left the previous day at Chambersburg, Pa., to guard the Confederate supply trains.Longstreet, who preferred the strategy of taking strong defensive positions and waiting for the enemy to attack, opposed Lee's plan to attack the Union line straight on. Longstreet writes in his account of Gettysburg in "Battles and Leaders of the Civil War" that he told Lee he thought the wisest course was to move around the Union left, find good defensive ground and wait for the Union army to attack.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 9, 1994
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- It is the ground that Lincoln said words could not hallow, the rolling fields and ridges of the farm town that became the central battlefield of the most searing conflict in U.S. history. Now a battle over the loss of part of that ground has drawn the scrutiny of Congress after riling Civil War experts and pitting townspeople against each other.The controversy has been brewing for years, the outgrowth of a long-running debate over just how much land should be set aside in this shrine to the thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers who died in the first three days of July 1863.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
Charles Truitt Smith, a retired computer company executive and avid collector of lead soldiers and vintage electric trains, died of a brain tumor Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Lutherville resident was 69. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was a 1954 graduate of the Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1958 from the Johns Hopkins University. He began his business career in 1958 as a salesman for National Cash Register and in 1962 took a similar position with International Business Machines.
NEWS
February 16, 1995
Hagerstown's hopes are clouded but there may still be a silver lining for Maryland if plans announced this week by the U.S. Park Service for a Civil War museum on the site of the Gettysburg battlefield come to fruition. Hagerstown launched a similar project last spring but the project has been unsuccessful so far in securing financial backing or widespread support. Now the Park Service's plan appears to doom Hagerstown's effort.But as an arena for several important Civil War battles, Maryland could still benefit from increased tourism and interest in the Civil War generated by a new federal museum at Gettysburg.
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