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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 11, 1990
SAN FRANCISCO -- The dollar value of computer chips ordered and shipped increased in August, but the semiconductor industry's leading indicator of demand continued the downward slide begun in June, a trade group reported yesterday.The Semiconductor Industry Association, based in San Jose, Calif., reported a book-to-bill ratio of 0.99 for the three months that ended in August, down from 1 in July. The ratio compares orders with shipments and is considered a leading indicator of industry performance.
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BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | September 12, 2004
EACH DAY on Wall Street, investors hang on the latest move in crude oil prices. Gasoline prices at the pump this summer did not march to record highs in lockstep with crude oil. Consumer price inflation remained benign. Yet daily trading in crude oil futures dominates the news. This year's advance in oil prices to record highs represents a fear factor in the global economy, not an inflationary imbalance in the supply and demand for energy. It's hard to guess when the fear factor will subside.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 1996
The founder of a Gaithersburg-based information technology company has been named entrepreneur of the year, and a Rockville-based supplier to the semiconductor industry has been named company of the year by the Suburban Maryland High Technology Council, a technology industry trade group.Entrepreneur award-winner Robert Grimes is founder and president of Cyntergy, which provides information tracking services to the retail, food and hospitality industries.He was cited for his persistence in keeping the company alive through a tough start-up period.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Joseph Menn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 14, 2003
A closely watched case challenging the high-tech industry's image as clean and safe is scheduled to get under way tomorrow, with two former IBM Corp. workers alleging that the computer giant covered up the risks of chemicals used in manufacturing. James Moore and Alida Hernandez contend that they developed cancer as a result of handling dangerous chemicals over several years at IBM's plant in San Jose, Calif., where disk drives are made. Moore and Hernandez are the first of more than 200 plaintiffs suing IBM for alleged health problems to have their cases reach trial.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- After seven years of steadily losing ground to Japan, the American semiconductor equipment industry actually gained market share last year at the expense of tough Japanese competitors, according to a new report released yesterday.The report was the first indication that one of the most vital -- but also most troubled -- sectors of the U.S. electronics industry might be returning to health after ceding world leadership to Japanese companies during the 1980s.U.S. operations gained 4 percentage points last year, giving them 47 percent of the almost $10 billion worldwide market for chip-making machines, according to VLSI Research Inc.'s annual survey of equipment companies.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1992
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The news from Europe and Japan was grim, and even the Koreans were unusually subdued. But after two years in a tough recession, sales of American chips are starting to boom, according to executives attending the annual In-Stat Inc. semiconductor conference.U.S. chip executives said in presentations and private conversations that sales are picking up faster than they expected as the national recovery solidifies.And panelists at the conference had even more encouraging words for U.S. chip makers: Changing dynamics in the world semiconductor market, including the economic crisis in Japan, make it likely the U.S. industry will be able to make substantial gains in worldwide market share for the first time in years.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A trade confrontation that had been looming for years was unexpectedly defused yesterday when American officials announced that Japan had met a target for imports of computer chips.Imports accounted for 20.2 percent of the Japanese semiconductor market in the fourth quarter of last year, exceeding the 20 percent target set in a 1991 trade agreement, said Donald H. Phillips, the assistant U.S. trade representative for industry.The U.S. semiconductor industry, which accounts for 85 percent of Japan's computer chip imports, has fought for seven years for the 20 percent overall foreign share, enlisting the aid of the Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations.
BUSINESS
By Joseph Menn and Joseph Menn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 14, 2003
A closely watched case challenging the high-tech industry's image as clean and safe is scheduled to get under way tomorrow, with two former IBM Corp. workers alleging that the computer giant covered up the risks of chemicals used in manufacturing. James Moore and Alida Hernandez contend that they developed cancer as a result of handling dangerous chemicals over several years at IBM's plant in San Jose, Calif., where disk drives are made. Moore and Hernandez are the first of more than 200 plaintiffs suing IBM for alleged health problems to have their cases reach trial.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | September 12, 2004
EACH DAY on Wall Street, investors hang on the latest move in crude oil prices. Gasoline prices at the pump this summer did not march to record highs in lockstep with crude oil. Consumer price inflation remained benign. Yet daily trading in crude oil futures dominates the news. This year's advance in oil prices to record highs represents a fear factor in the global economy, not an inflationary imbalance in the supply and demand for energy. It's hard to guess when the fear factor will subside.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 23, 1991
The largest manufacturer of semiconductors in the world has never sold a single chip.But after almost 30 years of making chips exclusively for its computers and other products and -- more recently -- serving as patron and de facto R&D center for the entire U.S. chip industry, International Business Machines Corp. is looking for a payback.The Armonk, N.Y., computer giant is hoping its $6.4 billion semiconductor operation has developed technology -- and products -- it can finally make some money on. And its first real customer may be Apple Computer Inc., its old desktop #i computing rival.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 16, 2000
PALM SPRINGS, Calif. -- Intel Corp. showed off a new microprocessor, code-named Willamette and running at 1.5 gigahertz, as the world's biggest semiconductor maker continues its race against rivals to have the fastest computer chip. At that speed, 1.5 billion electrical pulses are going through the chip every second to perform computer tasks. Intel's fastest production model chip is a Pentium III running at 800 megahertz, a little more than half as fast. Intel is in a heated race with rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. to have the fastest chip on the market.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 27, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday, led by drug and semiconductor companies, amid concern that shares are too expensive relative to prospects for earnings.Intel Corp. and Merck & Co. paced the decline.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 77.35 to 7,782.22, but is still up almost 21 percent for the year.It was the first time in 15 sessions the Dow didn't swing at least 100 points. Still, program trading made up much of the move. The end result of five "buy" programs and five "sell" programs was to shave 50 points from the Dow, according to Birinyi Associates, a Greenwich, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1996
Fusion Systems Corp., a Rockville company that sells manufacturing equipment to the semiconductor industry, said yesterday it would sell its ultraviolet curing division, Fusion UV Curing, to a British company for $121 million.The deal with Fairey Group PLC, based in Surrey, England, will allow Fusion Systems to focus on opportunities it expects from an anticipated consolidation in the semiconductor equipment industry, said Leslie Levine, the company's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1996
The founder of a Gaithersburg-based information technology company has been named entrepreneur of the year, and a Rockville-based supplier to the semiconductor industry has been named company of the year by the Suburban Maryland High Technology Council, a technology industry trade group.Entrepreneur award-winner Robert Grimes is founder and president of Cyntergy, which provides information tracking services to the retail, food and hospitality industries.He was cited for his persistence in keeping the company alive through a tough start-up period.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A trade confrontation that had been looming for years was unexpectedly defused yesterday when American officials announced that Japan had met a target for imports of computer chips.Imports accounted for 20.2 percent of the Japanese semiconductor market in the fourth quarter of last year, exceeding the 20 percent target set in a 1991 trade agreement, said Donald H. Phillips, the assistant U.S. trade representative for industry.The U.S. semiconductor industry, which accounts for 85 percent of Japan's computer chip imports, has fought for seven years for the 20 percent overall foreign share, enlisting the aid of the Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1992
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The news from Europe and Japan was grim, and even the Koreans were unusually subdued. But after two years in a tough recession, sales of American chips are starting to boom, according to executives attending the annual In-Stat Inc. semiconductor conference.U.S. chip executives said in presentations and private conversations that sales are picking up faster than they expected as the national recovery solidifies.And panelists at the conference had even more encouraging words for U.S. chip makers: Changing dynamics in the world semiconductor market, including the economic crisis in Japan, make it likely the U.S. industry will be able to make substantial gains in worldwide market share for the first time in years.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It has taken more than 10 years of annual lobbying trips, but it finally seems legislators and administration officials have learned the meaning of one of Silicon Valley's most important "s" words: semiconductors.But after 60 meetings with government people during a visit here recently, semiconductor industry executives were less certain that the government understood the importance of that other vital "s" word: sanctions.Members of the Semiconductor Industry Association were in Washington to ask the Bush administration and Congress to enforce a troubled semiconductor trade agreement with Japan.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1996
Fusion Systems Corp., a Rockville company that sells manufacturing equipment to the semiconductor industry, said yesterday it would sell its ultraviolet curing division, Fusion UV Curing, to a British company for $121 million.The deal with Fairey Group PLC, based in Surrey, England, will allow Fusion Systems to focus on opportunities it expects from an anticipated consolidation in the semiconductor equipment industry, said Leslie Levine, the company's president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 9, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- After seven years of steadily losing ground to Japan, the American semiconductor equipment industry actually gained market share last year at the expense of tough Japanese competitors, according to a new report released yesterday.The report was the first indication that one of the most vital -- but also most troubled -- sectors of the U.S. electronics industry might be returning to health after ceding world leadership to Japanese companies during the 1980s.U.S. operations gained 4 percentage points last year, giving them 47 percent of the almost $10 billion worldwide market for chip-making machines, according to VLSI Research Inc.'s annual survey of equipment companies.
BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It has taken more than 10 years of annual lobbying trips, but it finally seems legislators and administration officials have learned the meaning of one of Silicon Valley's most important "s" words: semiconductors.But after 60 meetings with government people during a visit here recently, semiconductor industry executives were less certain that the government understood the importance of that other vital "s" word: sanctions.Members of the Semiconductor Industry Association were in Washington to ask the Bush administration and Congress to enforce a troubled semiconductor trade agreement with Japan.
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