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Semiannual

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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2000
What one branch of government gives with one hand, another often takes away -- but not this time. Howard County will not charge homeowners a fee for paying their property taxes in semiannual installments instead of once at the start of each fiscal year, County Executive James N. Robey has announced. His move follows similar decisions by Baltimore, Montgomery and Frederick counties. The decision, which pending bills in the General Assembly could make state law anyway, will save the owner of a $200,000 home about $16 a year -- which equals a 2-cent increase in the property tax rate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
The Wine Market in Locust Point is both a wine shop and a bistro. Twice a year, the Wine Market's wine shop takes over the bistro space for its Wine'd Up event. Wine'd Up will feature more than 25 wines paired with hors d'ouevres. All of the wines will be available for purchase the same evening, and guests will be offered a 20 percent discount on all wines featured at the event. It's a great way to preview wines before you stock up. Wine'd Up is 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 16, at Wine Market Bistro, 921 E. Fort Ave. Tickets are $39. Call 410-244-6166 or go to winemarketbistro.com #sigshell { padding: 10px; float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
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BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | May 16, 1999
Although the phone calls have slowed from a tidal wave to a trickle, lenders, county and state officials are still sorting out the nuances as thousands of Marylanders elected to pay their property taxes on a semiannual basis.On Thursday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed into law legislation that flipped the way homeowners pay their property taxes, making semiannual the standard and annual payment an option, starting with the tax year that begins July 1, 2000.The idea was to lower closing costs in Maryland, which are among the highest in the nation.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
By the end of yesterday's job fair at Fort Meade, the recruiting table for NMR Consulting had a stack of about 50 resumes from prospective information technology job candidates. Not bad for a few hours, but that's indicative of how the Baltimore-Washington area has become a hub for technology jobs, said Frank Ringley, the Annapolis-based company's director of intelligence and security programs. "It's a very good place to find employees," he said. "If you look around the corridor ... there are so many defense contractors here, it just draws [information technology]
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1999
Lawmakers in Annapolis are eyeing legislation sought by Realtors to lower Maryland's high real estate closing costs. But the effort faces stiff opposition from bankers and local officials, who stand to lose millions of dollars.A bill is pending before the House of Delegates that would require all Maryland property owners to pay their real estate taxes in semiannual installments, ending the current practice of collecting the taxes annually. A similar bill is before a Senate committee.House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. touted the legislation yesterday as "a solution to Maryland's very high closing costs" and the equivalent of a tax refund for hundreds of thousands of homeowners.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | November 14, 1999
Thousands of Marylanders who used a little-known 1995 law to switch their payment of property taxes from an annual to semiannual basis and get a substantial escrow rebate from their lenders may be in for a rude awakening when it comes to income tax time.The law permits lenders to make the second payment in January. If lenders do so, homeowners who itemize deductions will be able to claim only six months' worth of property taxes on their tax returns.The deduction, however, isn't permanently lost; homeowners will get the benefit of 18 months' worth of property tax to deduct next year.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | July 2, 2000
Joel Schlanger, the director for the Baltimore County Office of Budget and Finance, is ready this time. Thousands of property tax bills were sent out Friday, and Schlanger and his office are expecting "a lot of phone calls by July 5." But that's OK. Schlanger and other county officials in similar positions have been battle-tested since the General Assembly passed legislation last year that changed the method of paying property taxes on primary residences from an annual to semiannual basis.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1998
Feb. 19-22 American Craft Enterprises crafts fair, Baltimore Convention Center. Contact: Christine Crawfis, 914-883-6100. Expected attendance: 7,000March 2-5 American Congress on Surveying and Mapping semiannual meeting, Baltimore Convention Center. Contact: Linda Hachero, 301-530-1619. Expected attendance: 3,000March 3-5 Clean Rooms International, Baltimore Convention Center. Contact: Melanie McClurkin, 908-788-8868. Expected attendance: 3,500Pub Date: 1/19/98
BUSINESS
April 27, 1997
Mike Tyson's home for sale for $22 millionFormer heavyweight champion Mike Tyson is ready for a knockout offer to come his way since recently listing his Connecticut mansion for approximately $22 million with Century 21 -- the biggest in company history.According to Century 21 spokeswoman Christine Palumbo, there have been offers made to purchase the property, but no deal has been finalized. The property, in Farmington, Conn., has more than 56,000 square feet on 17 acres.The three-story mansion includes more than 60 rooms, 24 baths and 14 half-baths, 20 bedrooms, seven gourmet kitchens, four conference rooms, a theater, a dance club with video wall, state-of-the-art sound system and bar, an Olympic-sized pool and Jaccuzi.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2000
Property owners who pay taxes semiannually will likely continue to be charged a fee of $15 or $20 a year, because County Executive Janet S. Owens says the county cannot afford to eliminate the surcharge. Eliminating the fee would cost the county about $1.5 million, and Owens says that would cover salaries for 37 teachers. Owens explained her decision not to support a change in a letter to Del. John R. Leopold, a Pasadena Republican who has pushed her to eliminate the added fee to help homeowners and homebuyers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 19, 2005
A Navy officer assigned to the Naval Academy collapsed and died yesterday afternoon after a 1.5-mile run for a physical readiness test at the Annapolis campus, the academy announced. He collapsed on Farragut Field, one of the academy's athletic fields, about 1 p.m. and was pronounced dead at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The junior officer -- whose name was not divulged -- had just finished a semiannual physical test, said an academy spokesman. It was the second death in a week and half at the academy.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | September 15, 2002
THERE IS a lot of information investors wish they could get from mutual fund companies. The top executive's certification of the fund's financial statements is not part of it. Don't get me wrong. If the Securities and Exchange Commission intends to have every corporate top dog in America vouch for the truth in the numbers, it won't get any complaints from me. It will just have a hard time proving that such a document is actually fruitful and worthwhile for investors. "I don't think a certification would have any substantive meaning for the shareholders of a fund," says Burton J. Greenwald of B.J. Greenwald & Associates, a Philadelphia-based industry consulting firm.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | July 2, 2000
Joel Schlanger, the director for the Baltimore County Office of Budget and Finance, is ready this time. Thousands of property tax bills were sent out Friday, and Schlanger and his office are expecting "a lot of phone calls by July 5." But that's OK. Schlanger and other county officials in similar positions have been battle-tested since the General Assembly passed legislation last year that changed the method of paying property taxes on primary residences from an annual to semiannual basis.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2000
Property owners who pay taxes semiannually will likely continue to be charged a fee of $15 or $20 a year, because County Executive Janet S. Owens says the county cannot afford to eliminate the surcharge. Eliminating the fee would cost the county about $1.5 million, and Owens says that would cover salaries for 37 teachers. Owens explained her decision not to support a change in a letter to Del. John R. Leopold, a Pasadena Republican who has pushed her to eliminate the added fee to help homeowners and homebuyers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2000
What one branch of government gives with one hand, another often takes away -- but not this time. Howard County will not charge homeowners a fee for paying their property taxes in semiannual installments instead of once at the start of each fiscal year, County Executive James N. Robey has announced. His move follows similar decisions by Baltimore, Montgomery and Frederick counties. The decision, which pending bills in the General Assembly could make state law anyway, will save the owner of a $200,000 home about $16 a year -- which equals a 2-cent increase in the property tax rate.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | November 14, 1999
Thousands of Marylanders who used a little-known 1995 law to switch their payment of property taxes from an annual to semiannual basis and get a substantial escrow rebate from their lenders may be in for a rude awakening when it comes to income tax time.The law permits lenders to make the second payment in January. If lenders do so, homeowners who itemize deductions will be able to claim only six months' worth of property taxes on their tax returns.The deduction, however, isn't permanently lost; homeowners will get the benefit of 18 months' worth of property tax to deduct next year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
A law lowering closing costs in Maryland took effect in part July 1, but homebuyers may have to wait months -- or even years -- for the intended benefits.The first overhaul of Maryland's property tax system in two decades, signed into law in May, is expected to save many homebuyers thousands of dollars at settlement time and bring costs in line with those of neighboring states. The real estate industry views the reduction in upfront costs as a first step toward energizing a stalled housing market and boosting economic development.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 25, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The lawmakers who listened to testimony yesterday about a bill to allow the semiannual payment of property taxes seemed sympathetic to its supporters.But in the end, the counties and municipalities, which would have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to switch to a semiannual tax-payment system, were confident their opposing arguments would prevail for the third year in a row.The bill, sponsored by Sen. Nancy L. Murphy, D-Baltimore Co., would give home buyers the choice of defering for six months half of the 12- to-14 months of property tax they must now pay at settlement.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | May 16, 1999
Although the phone calls have slowed from a tidal wave to a trickle, lenders, county and state officials are still sorting out the nuances as thousands of Marylanders elected to pay their property taxes on a semiannual basis.On Thursday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed into law legislation that flipped the way homeowners pay their property taxes, making semiannual the standard and annual payment an option, starting with the tax year that begins July 1, 2000.The idea was to lower closing costs in Maryland, which are among the highest in the nation.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | April 18, 1999
Marc Witman and Mary Antoun are giddy about the mountain they have conquered. They are inhaling the rarefied air of success.For Witman, president of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors, it was a crusade.For Antoun, executive vice president of the Maryland Association of Realtors, it was the end of 15 years of frustration.For Maryland homeowners with escrow accounts, it means they'll share in a one-time refund totaling nearly half a billion dollars. Yes, that's half a billion. And if they act quickly, they can get the money sooner than later.
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