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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 2003
The number of American students weaving study-abroad sojourns into their college curriculums is continuing to grow, but for many students it now means trips to China or Cuba or Kenya with a professor for a few weeks during vacation - for credit. Interest in programs of less than a semester has been growing since the mid-1980s, and such programs now account for nearly 77,000 students, almost half of all students studying abroad, according to new figures released by the Institute of International Education.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
As the fall semester began at Towson University last year, Erin Garnes settled into one of the dormitories and signed up for clubs and other school activities. But one thing separated her from Towson students: All of her classes were taught by community college professors. Under a program at Towson, if she did well, she would be admitted to the university in the spring. Her experience mirrors a practice that's been growing at colleges in Maryland and across the country in recent years — offering some students admission for the spring semester and providing a bridge during the fall to help them adjust to the rigors of college.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2001
Shannon Parker got the word a couple of weeks ago - her "schedule had been dropped." That's an ominous phrase at Morgan State University heard by about 300 or 400 of the school's 6,000 undergraduates a few weeks into each semester. It means there's no money to pay their bills, and they have to go home. For Morgan State officials, it is heartbreaking evidence that they should have more need-based scholarship money that would be controlled by the campus to take care of such situations. For Parker, the word came when, after five years of loans and part-time jobs, she was three credits - one course - from graduating with a degree in psychology.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
The University of Baltimore will offer free tuition to college students in their final semester if they can finish their degrees in four years, the school announced Tuesday. The unusual break could boost the college's flagging graduation rates and reduce student debt loads. Dubbed "Finish4Free," the deal is to be offered to this fall's freshmen when they reach their senior year, school officials said. They were unsure how much it would cost the university. In-state students now pay about $3,300 in tuition each semester; out-of-state students pay $9,000.
NEWS
By LIZ BOWIE and LIZ BOWIE,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
Catherine M. Weymann used to be a quiet nerd, secluded in her college dorm room, studying hard. Then a hurricane swept through and changed her life. Weymann evacuated from Loyola University of New Orleans with two pillowcases of belongings and a scrapbook of her grandmother's memories. A few weeks and a plane ride later, she enrolled at Loyola College in Baltimore and started taking classes. Suddenly, the junior wasn't tied down in her hometown, and she began to explore the East Coast.
NEWS
July 19, 1994
During this month's World Cup competition, soccer fans in the Netherlands erupted in raucous celebration after their countrymen's victory over Ireland in a game, smashing windows, robbing stores and setting cars afire in The Hague. Days earlier, a Colombian soccer player was brutally gunned down because he mistakenly made a goal for the opposing U.S. team. Last month, Vancouver hockey fans ran amok and injured hundreds of people when their team lost the Stanley Cup; similar riotousness and recklessness sometimes flares up in U.S. cities in the wake of sports championships.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Njideka Agwuna , of Columbia, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at Binghamton University, State University of New York, in Vestal, N.Y.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
The following students earned degrees from Excelsior College, in Albany, N.Y.: Christine Comfort , of Ellicott City, earned a Bachelor of Science; Sungmin Yi , of Elkridge, earned a Bachelor of Science; and   Luke Carneal , of Woodbine, has been named to the dean's honors list for the spring 2011 semester at Connecticut College, in New London, Conn. Nicholas Donohue and John Steger , both of Laurel, have been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester in the Villanova School of Business at Villanova University, in Villanova, Pa. The following students have been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at at Villanova University, in Villanova, Pa.: Austin Gallas , of Laurel; Kelly Holt , of Laurel; Kelly Donovan , of Ellicott City; Alexandra Argenti , of Fulton; and Trevor Safko , ofSykesville.
SPORTS
November 1, 1991
Maryland athletic director Andy Geiger said last night that his department has begun its standard mid-semester review of athletes who have had grade problems the previous semester. The review might affect the playing status of several football players.Geiger said the players would be eligible tomorrow against North Carolina and that a ruling would come before the Nov. 9 game against Penn State at Memorial Stadium.Geiger said that, because of school policy, he could not release names. He did say, however, that the players were not full-time starters but played regularly.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | March 2, 1993
Anne Arundel County school board members are scheduled to vote tomorrow on their staff's proposal to implement the state's public service requirement through classroom work only.Students in grades four and five would be introduced to the values of citizenship and community membership during their social studies units. In three years of middle school, students would receive 10 hours annually of instruction, building on the elementary school material.High school students would receive 20 hours of credit through one semester of "American Government" and one semester of "Law and the Individual."
NEWS
January 21, 2014
If Maryland is No. 1 in education, it's obvious to me that the assessment criteria used to determine that ranking must not be very meaningful ( "Md. is still No. 1," Jan. 15). I am an adjunct faculty member at a local community college, and every semester I work with 20 to 40 students who are products of Maryland's "highly ranked" education system. Most of these students have graduated from high school without ever having achieved a basic proficiency in reading and math. Lest anyone think I am overstating the problem, I should point out that for the spring 2014 semester, just one Maryland community college has scheduled 94 remedial English classes and 218 remedial math classes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
School days for Baltimore County high school students will be significantly different next year when Superintendent Dallas Dance imposes a uniform, eight-class schedule throughout the district. The move allows students to squeeze in more lessons. That could help transfer students who had to drop classes when they moved to schools with shorter schedules or failing students who are falling behind in the credits they need for graduation, proponents say. School officials said the shift also makes better use of the teaching staff.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
Loyola University Maryland has sent me the student evaluations from the semester just past, and there it is again, the sentence that has cropped up in more or less the same form over thirty-five semesters: "I have learned more from this class than any other class I have taken at Loyola. " This is not to brag about my distinction as a teacher. Every semester the evaluations carry comments from the students I have not been able to reach, who were more preoccupied with their grades than with their understanding, or who quite understandably found my manner off-putting.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2012
Jake Layman's adjustment to college life in general at Maryland and basketball in particular was a bit more difficult than the other three freshmen who were part of second-year coach Mark Turgeon's first recruiting class. That he admittedly fell behind in his classwork - to the point where Turgeon benched him for the first half of a recent game for failing to turn in a paper - contributed to the issues he had on the court, the 6-8 forward said Monday. “I think me getting behind in school, which was a good learning experience for me the first semester, it turned into me not doing well on the court, too,” Layman said after practice at Comcast Center.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Students drawn to Morgan State University's strong academics and historical legacy are finding that crime is becoming an increasing distraction, and are joining a state lawmaker and alumnus in calling for better security to protect the institution's reputation. The latest incident took place Friday. Baltimore police said a 20-year-old man who is not a student at Morgan shot a lineman on the university's football team as students wound down the last day of classes before fall-semester finals.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Njideka Agwuna , of Columbia, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at Binghamton University, State University of New York, in Vestal, N.Y.
EXPLORE
August 11, 2011
Christi Halpin, of Mount Airy, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at the University of Maryland. She is majoring in psychology and a 2010 graduate of Glenelg High School. Alexander Pendleton, of Laurel, has been named to the honor roll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the spring 2011 semester at the University of Kansas, in Lawrence, Kan. He is the son of Michael and Vibeke Pendleton and a graduate of New Mexico Military Institute, in Roswell, N.M. Marcellus Richburg, of Woodstock, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at Central Penn College, in Summerdale, Pa. Richburg is currently majoring in corporate communications.
EXPLORE
August 11, 2011
Christi Halpin, of Mount Airy, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at the University of Maryland. She is majoring in psychology and a 2010 graduate of Glenelg High School. Alexander Pendleton, of Laurel, has been named to the honor roll in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the spring 2011 semester at the University of Kansas, in Lawrence, Kan. He is the son of Michael and Vibeke Pendleton and a graduate of New Mexico Military Institute, in Roswell, N.M. Marcellus Richburg, of Woodstock, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at Central Penn College, in Summerdale, Pa. Richburg is currently majoring in corporate communications.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
The following students earned degrees from Excelsior College, in Albany, N.Y.: Christine Comfort , of Ellicott City, earned a Bachelor of Science; Sungmin Yi , of Elkridge, earned a Bachelor of Science; and   Luke Carneal , of Woodbine, has been named to the dean's honors list for the spring 2011 semester at Connecticut College, in New London, Conn. Nicholas Donohue and John Steger , both of Laurel, have been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester in the Villanova School of Business at Villanova University, in Villanova, Pa. The following students have been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at at Villanova University, in Villanova, Pa.: Austin Gallas , of Laurel; Kelly Holt , of Laurel; Kelly Donovan , of Ellicott City; Alexandra Argenti , of Fulton; and Trevor Safko , ofSykesville.
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