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NEWS
July 17, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- One of the clock faces on the Bromo Seltzer Tower shows the wrong time. THE BACKSTORY -- This problem started a couple of weeks ago, when reader Maura Deeley noticed that the times on all four clock faces atop the 200-foot-high tower at Eutaw and Lombard streets showed different times, none of them correct. Watchdog investigated and found that she was right. At 5:40 a.m., the 25-foot-tall clock facing south showed 2:23. The clocks facing west and north said it was 5:16.
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NEWS
December 4, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower in the city's newest arts and entertainment district. Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen designed four hopscotch courts in crosswalks at Eutaw and Lombard streets that were unveiled last week. Coreil-Allen, who creates art in public places, also created an installation in Waverly called Tinges Commons and, earlier this fall, led tours of "invisible sites and overlooked architectural and psychic features" in Station North.
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FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 26, 2002
For the first time in 28 years, Baltimore's quirky "Arts Tower" has no city arts employees working there and is available for a new use. Employees from the old Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture moved out over the weekend, following that agency's merger this year with the Baltimore Office of Promotion. The move was designed to bring all of the employees of the combined agency, now called the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, to one location. The agency's new offices are on the fifth floor of the Legg Mason Building at 7 E. Redwood St. - the barely used former headquarters of the failed Coleman Craten brokerage firm.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring.  Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower in the city's newest Arts and Entertainment district.  Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen painted a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard Streets that was unveiled today.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 3, 2003
Baltimore's vacant Bromo Seltzer tower would be converted to artist studios by next fall under a $1.3 million renovation plan developed by local arts advocates. The Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, a quasi-public city agency, hired the architectural firm of Schamu Machowski Greco (SMG)this fall to prepare construction documents that can be used to turn the city-owned tower, last used as municipal office space, into artist studios. The architects have also been asked to draw renderings and floor plans that can be used to raise funds and market the studios to prospective tenants.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1997
Edward Emerson Murray, one of the owners of the Bromo Seltzer Tower who helped forge the deal that gave the building to Baltimore in 1973, died Thursday of pneumonia at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. He was 77.The Baltimore resident, who was on vacation in Salisbury, was 77.Mr. Murray's great-uncle, Capt. Isaac E. Emerson, founded and ran Emerson Drug Co., which built the 300-foot-tall tower at Eutaw and Lombard streets to advertise one of its products, Bromo Seltzer, a powder for headaches and upset stomachs.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has backed away from plans to invest in the redevelopment of Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer tower, just days after he pulled out of a disputed land acquisition deal in St. Mary's County. Hackerman, chief executive of Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., had been negotiating to purchase federal preservation tax credits as the last piece of a financing package that would enable Baltimore to proceed with a $1.5 million renovation of the vacant tower at 15 S. Eutaw St., transforming it to artists' studios.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1999
FIVE MONTHS before Kurt L. Schmoke left the mayor's office in Baltimore, his housing commissioner suggested creating upscale residences inside one of Baltimore's best known landmarks, the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower at 15 S. Eutaw St.Now it's up to Mayor Martin O'Malley and acting housing commissioner M. J. "Jay" Brodie to decide whether the project moves ahead and, if so, who will carry it out.In response to a request for proposals issued when Schmoke was...
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,sun reporter | October 8, 2006
Photographer Chris Peregoy works from a darkroom on the second floor of his Baltimore rowhouse. Yesterday, he surveyed a work space with 11-foot ceilings in one of the most recognizable buildings in the downtown skyline. He was among dozens of artists - painters, sculptors and writers - who climbed a circular staircase to the upper floors of the Bromo Seltzer tower during an open house. The 1911 Italianate landmark, a former factory and office building known for the blue glow cast from 25-foot-tall clock faces, is taking on a new life as an urban art center.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has backed away from plans to invest in the redevelopment of Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer tower, just days after he pulled out of a disputed land acquisition deal in St. Mary's County. Hackerman, chief executive of Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., had been negotiating to purchase federal preservation tax credits as the last piece of a financing package that would enable Baltimore to proceed with a $1.5 million renovation of the vacant tower at 15 S. Eutaw St., transforming it to artists' studios.
NEWS
May 8, 2012
Any effort that promises to attract new residents and businesses to a historic Baltimore neighborhood could do a lot worse than make the arts a magnet for bringing people together. That's why we can't see any down side to a city proposal to create a third arts and entertainment district for Baltimore, this one on the west side of downtown. If the idea of a new cultural destination works anywhere near as well there as it has elsewhere in the city and state, the results are practically guaranteed to be an improvement over the status quo. State economic development officials are expected to decide by June 1 whether to approve Baltimore's request to designate 117 acres of downtown as the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Two of Baltimore's most recognizable landmarks will be lit up in blue Monday in honor of World Diabetes Day — a commemoration inspired by a 16-year-old girl's desire to draw attention to the prevalent disease. The Washington Monument in Mount Vernon and the Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower will be illuminated Monday evening. Blue is the color of the globally recognized symbol for diabetes, a circle. The city granted the request by Amanda Witherspoon, a Garrison Forest School sophomore who was diagnosed six years ago with Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease that can damage victims' eyes, kidneys, heart and blood vessels, and nerves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
Starting at sunset Saturday, artist Kelley Bell will place Baltimore's venerable landmark Bromo Seltzer Tower at the exact center of the solar system. For at least the next five weeks, pedestrians and motorists will view the four faces of the clock tower alight with Bell's animations every day between sunset and sunrise. The design she's chosen humorously plays off Baltimoreans' affection for the 1911 tower by making the focal point for the sun, moon, planets and stars. "The Bromo Seltzer Tower fills a unique role in this city," says Joe Wall, the tower's facilities manager, who dreamed up the idea of animating the 24-foot-in-diameter clock faces.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Baltimore's Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower is marking its first century this month as a commercially impractical but beloved curiosity named for a top-selling hangover cure. On Thursday night, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and others celebrated the centennial at the 1911 tower, the tallest downtown structure until 1923. Guests rode a 1911 Otis elevator to the historic chamber high above the corner of Lombard and Eutaw streets to observe the clockworks and elevator motors. "Like Baltimore, it's quirky," said artist Greg Otto, who has painted the tower numerous times and reproduced it on postcards.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 7, 2010
Here's an update on one problem for Baltimore residents and workers: Baltimore's signature timepiece should get some attention next week. The time displayed by the hands on the southern face of the Bromo Seltzer Tower has been incorrect for several years. Watchdog first reported about the problem, which then affected all the faces, in 2007. Repairs resolved the issue for all the faces except for the one facing south. Clock repair specialists were called in, but nothing helped.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | July 22, 2009
Four Marylanders who helped transform Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer Tower into artists' studios are exploring plans to restore another city property, the Inn at Government House. The Baltimore Development Corp. has selected Government House LLC, a team that includes father-and-son developers Martin and Tony Azola of Azola & Associates and philanthropists Sylvia and Eddie Brown, to receive a negotiating privilege that will give them time to come up with plans for redeveloping the three-building complex at 1125 to 1129 N. Calvert St. The selection comes eight months after the city sought proposals from developers interested in buying or leasing the 21-room inn, considered the city's official guesthouse.
SPORTS
May 31, 1992
Dear Stadium Doctor:I've been meaning to send this letter for about three weeks.While at a recent game, I was sitting on the first-base side and noticed the view of Eutaw Street, including the Bromo Seltzer Tower, became increasingly drab. Maybe the owner of the building should take a look at the older buildings in Manhattan, many of which have colored lights reflecting off their tops.The Bromo Seltzer Tower adds to the atmosphere of Camden Yards and shouldn't be lost in the night.Chris CanningBaltimoreDear Chris Canning:Thank you for your illuminating suggestion about the Bromo Seltzer Tower, which happens to be one of my favorite downtown landmarks, rivaling Stadium Doctor Birthplace and Museum and the site of a chance meeting several years ago between myself and weatherman Tom Tasselmyer.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
For Justin Talbot, the other three seasons are for playing football, running track and hanging out with friends. Summer is for hanging out with his grandfather, Rowland Fontz, and that is part of the reason that Baltimore's Bromo Seltzer clock is working again.Justin, 15, and Fontz, 71, have spent the last month going to the top of the Bromo Seltzer Tower with one purpose in mind: to revive the clock.Success came Thursday afternoon about 2: 30, ending a hiatus of about three months. The clock had faltered April 7, then stopped early in June -- reading "10: 04" -- because the hands were weighing too heavily on the clock's gear mechanism.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | June 1, 2008
Creating artists' studios inside Baltimore's historic Bromo Seltzer Tower, part of the factory where Capt. Isaac Emerson made his famous headache and heartburn remedy, brought its own set of headaches for the public officials, architects and contractors who worked on the $1.5 million project. Their solution, which will be unveiled at a grand opening Thursday, is one of the most inspired and resourceful preservation projects Baltimore has seen in some time, a feat of ingenuity that retains the tower's 1911 appearance while promising to keep it bustling with activity.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | June 1, 2008
In Studio 702, Billy Joel sings "The Piano Man" as Baltimore native Brian Glazer Gerber swirls red paint around a large canvas he has stretched across the floor. In 904, writer Sarah Richards types notes to herself for a tale about the "camping trip from Hell" that she'll relate this month as part of the popular storytelling series at Center Stage, "The Stoop." Open House 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday. Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower, 15 S. Eutaw St. Visitors can register for a drawing to win a work of art donated by the tower artists.
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