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NEWS
April 20, 1993
In mid-1971, a group of three men, each equipped with a walkie-talkie, appeared at the auction of the old Emerson Hotel in downtown Baltimore. Without announcing their affiliation, they quietly purchased (for a song) many of the hotel's beds, bureaus and chairs. The next day a truck hauled them to Loyola College, where they were used to equip dormitories.The Emerson Hotel caper was one of many engineered by the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, Loyola's president since 1964. "You have to be something of an operator to be successful in this business," President Sellinger said later.
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NEWS
February 7, 2003
OF THE 27 states that provide public aid to independent colleges, Maryland is among the most generous. The state's 18 private colleges and universities get $43 million a year in unrestricted aid. That's a tempting pot of money for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and his budget cutters, who have proposed reducing taxpayer support for private colleges by more than half. This comes at a time when the state's public colleges and universities have seen their budgets slashed to 1991 levels and have had to impose a midyear tuition increase.
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NEWS
By John Steadman | April 21, 1993
HIS PRESENCE, of course, was at all times priestly. He was the Rev. Joseph Sellinger, S.J., a truly ecumenical man profoundly respected by Jew, Protestant and Roman Catholic alike. He made an impact on Baltimore during the 29 years he presided over Loyola College such as few clerics or administrators have.It was Father Sellinger who changed the stature of Loyola, taking it from a school for "day hops" to a position in academia that now attracts a cross-section of America. Loyola and Father Sellinger became almost synonymous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2002
That was quite a turnout a couple of weeks ago as Loyola College honored B-more mega-mogul John Paterakis. Some 1,200 folks filled the Renaissance Inner Harbor ballroom for the "2002 Business Leader of the Year Award Dinner." Loyola's Sel-linger School of Business and Management has been throwing the event each year since 1983. "This was the biggest, best attended, so far," says Sellinger School dean Lee Dahringer, "certainly the most popular we've had to date." Talk about a room packed with powerful people.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | April 21, 1993
A giant died here Monday. He was the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, 72, president of Loyola College.If you're wondering what this has to do with sports the answer is: a lot. It especially has a lot to do with a sports event to be played tonight, a lacrosse game between Loyola and Johns Hopkins at Homewood.Father Sellinger, in his 29th year as head of Loyola, was the longest tenured president at any Jesuit college or university in America.I knew him for all that time and I can assure you he was active, involved, hands on. He was a presence.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
The Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, S.J., the implacable force that drove Loyola College through its three-decade journey from small provincial school to regional university, died yesterday in his sleep at home. He was 72.The Jesuit priest who moved comfortably in the realm of corporate executives and golf course schmoozers succumbed to the inoperable pancreatic cancer that was diagnosed last July. Everyone knew the end was coming, but still the news of his death seemed to hush the hallways of the North Charles Street campus yesterday.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | May 16, 1993
For the first time in 29 years, candidates for graduation a Loyola College marched yesterday to "Pomp and Circumstance" without the watchful eyes of the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, S.J., measuring their steps.But Loyola's late president and what he stood for were in evidence nevertheless during the college's 144th commencement and the granting of 714 diplomas to graduates yesterday at the Baltimore Arena.Father Sellinger, who became president of the Jesuit school in 1964, died of cancer at the age of 72 in April just short of the fulfillment of his last wish, to see the 1993 class at Loyola graduate.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | April 24, 1993
Although about 1,000 people gathered to say goodbye to the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, S. J., it was really Father Sellinger who said goodbye to them.President of Loyola College since 1964, the determined and charismatic Jesuit priest who died Monday at age 72 of pancreatic cancer helped plan his funeral, which was held yesterday at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen on North Charles Street.One of his main requests was that the service be a celebration rather than a mournful commemoration.So one man, an old friend, the Rev. E. Paul Betowski, S. J., spoke about Father Sellinger.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
The state's formula for distributing aid to private colleges was officially named for the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger in an emotional bill-signing ceremony yesterday.Gov. William Donald Schaefer, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and Speaker of the House R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. signed the first bill of this legislative session as they stood with Father Sellinger, the president of Loyola College who is dying of pancreatic cancer.Mr. Schaefer praised Father Sellinger, crediting him with devising the pioneering formula used to give aid to private colleges in 1971.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
Loyola began conquering the bad news about Father Joe Sellinger on a hot, clear September afternoon.Every year, the priest looked forward to this day, to the Mass of the Holy Spirit that was the spiritual beginning of the school year. And every year, he would be disappointed, demanding after the service, "Where were the students?"But this year, as if a message had been secretly passed from person to person, a crowd -- big beyond belief -- gathered in the college's neo-Gothic chapel. The students were everywhere, in the aisles, out the door, even on the floor behind the altar.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
A former hockey player who made it to the top of his industry without the imprimatur of an M.B.A. degree will be honored tonight as Loyola College's "Business Leader of the Year," a prestigious designation awarded annually by the Sellinger School of Business and Management. Robert J. Lawless, chairman, president and chief executive of McCormick & Co. Inc., will receive the honor at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore. With 1,000 tickets sold at $100 each, it is the largest turnout in the event's 17-year history.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
Lee D. Dahringer, dean of the West Virginia University College of Business and Economics since 1999, is the new dean of the Joseph A. Sellinger, S.J., School of Business and Management at Loyola College, Loyola announced yesterday. Dahringer, 53, will assume leadership of the Sellinger School for the fall semester, but will not be there full time until October. He succeeds Peter Lorenzi - who last fall announced plans to return to the faculty as a professor of management - after a search that lasted about a year.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
William L. Jews, president and chief executive of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, was named "Business Leader of the Year" yesterday by Loyola College's Sellinger School of Business. "This is an honor for me, personally, but also, certainly an honor for CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, whose success during my tenure is due to the hard work of dedicated associates across the company," Jews said in a statement. Jews, 48, became president of BlueCross BlueShield of Maryland in 1993, taking over a troubled health care plan that was ranked near the bottom among BlueCross BlueShield plans across the country.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Raymond A. "Chip" Mason, chairman and chief executive officer of Legg Mason Inc., will be named "business leader of the year" next week by Loyola College's Sellinger School of Business and Management.Mason, who has built the Baltimore brokerage and asset management company to an institution that oversees $95 billion and employs about 4,500 people, said he has refused to accept such awards in the past."I did it because of Sellinger," said Mason, referring to the late Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, who was president of the college and built the business school.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Setting the stage for a major constitutional battle over government aid to religion, the Supreme Court said yesterday that it will review a program that supplies taxpayer-financed computers, software and library books to parochial schools.At issue is a federal program, dating to 1981, that provides educational materials on loan, free of charge, to more than 1 million parochial students a year. The same items are available free to all public school students, too, under a nationwide program to promote "innovative" education.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1998
The head of Baltimore's most prominent business leadership and lobbying group was honored last night by Loyola College's Sellinger School of Business and Management. Frank P. Bramble, chairman of the Greater Baltimore Committee, was named Business Leader of the Year before more than 800 people at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel.Bramble, president and chief executive of First Maryland Bancorp, is chairman of the Baltimore Center for the Performing Arts, vice chairman of the University of Maryland Medical Systems and a member of the mayor's Business Advisory Council.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Raymond A. "Chip" Mason, chairman and chief executive officer of Legg Mason Inc., will be named "business leader of the year" next week by Loyola College's Sellinger School of Business and Management.Mason, who has built the Baltimore brokerage and asset management company to an institution that oversees $95 billion and employs about 4,500 people, said he has refused to accept such awards in the past."I did it because of Sellinger," said Mason, referring to the late Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, who was president of the college and built the business school.
NEWS
September 1, 1992
The last thing Till Strudwick, a Loyola College groundskeeper, expected yesterday was to hear himself hailed as a campus hero, the embodiment of the standards Loyola strives to teach.But Saturday, on a campus street, Mr. Strudwick found an envelope holding $2,200 in cash. Stunned to be holding that much money, and worried about the person who lost it, Mr. Strudwick gave the cash to security, who returned it to a freshman.His good deed did not go unnoticed. Yesterday, when college employees gathered for the annual start-of-the-school-year program, Loyola's president, the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, S. J., led the applause for an overwhelmed Mr. Strudwick.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1997
Loyola College plans to spend $24 million over the next two years to construct a new home on its main Baltimore campus for the Sellinger School of Business and Management and a satellite facility in Baltimore County for business and graduate-level education.The Rev. Harold Ridley, S.J., Loyola's president, is scheduled to outline plans for the projects tonight during an awards dinner at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel.During the dinner, Ridley and the business school board of sponsors will present the school's 1997 Business Leader of the Year Award to Charles M. Cawley, chairman and chief executive officer of MBNA America Bank, which is opening a new regional center in Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1996
Price's Collins honored as Leader of the YearGeorge J. Collins, president and chief executive of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc., last night was named the 1996 Business Leader of the Year.The award was presented to Mr. Collins by the Sellinger School )) of Business and Management at Loyola College at its annual award dinner in Baltimore.The award recognizes Mr. Collins' achievements since he joined T. Rowe Price in 1971.Under his leadership, T. Rowe Price has grown to become one of the nation's largest no-load mutual funds, with $75 billion in assets under management.
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