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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 23, 1998
For many viewers, seeing "The Closer" tonight is going to seem like anti-climax after they've been forced to witness 10,000 promotional spots for it during the Olympics. I wonder if such promotional overkill isn't the kiss of death for a new series -- engendering an unconscious resentment in viewers for having to hear the same canned laughter over and over. Does anyone remember "Fish Police"?Tom Selleck is better than any of the animated marine life law enforcement officers in that CBS wonder canceled after three episodes in 1992.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2002
FAIRFAX, Va. - It takes something special to turn Tom Selleck into just another guy in the room and a bunch of Inside-the-Beltway hot shots into boys on the playground. What it takes is Charlton Heston and a glass case full of famous guns from Hollywood films and TV. Now 77, Heston doesn't project a man-of-action image anymore. And sometimes, you have to lean close to hear what he's saying. But make no mistake, he still parts a crowd the way his Moses parted the Red Sea. Heston was in Northern Virginia this week to open the National Firearms Museum's exhibit, "Real Guns of Reel Heroes."
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FEATURES
By New York Daily News | October 28, 1990
Talking with Tom Selleck is an unnerving experience. Unlik ** so many other stars, in this case you actually get exactly what you expect.Though somewhat cautious about his personal life ("I try to keep a portion of it private, which is a hard thing to do," he says), he fields questions with meticulous thoughtfulness. If not each word, then at least each answer seems to be measured for its ultimate weight. He is a man who will not be burned in the future as he has been in the past.Not that he's a shy man -- or a rude one. Polite nearly to a fault, he's more like, well, an open-range hero who only says enough to get his horse fed, his stock tended and his woman taken care of. In other words, the guy's just a cowboy -- more Gary Cooper than Walter Brennan, mind you -- complete with "How the West Was Won" philosophy.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Gus G. Sentementes and Stacey Hirsh and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2000
Latisha Turner woke up at 5:45 a.m. yesterday to finish her holiday shopping before the rush, but she could just as well have slept in. When she got to the Big Kmart in Carney, there was only a handful of customers there. "I figured if I go before 8 a.m., I'm going to beat the crowd," Turner said. The crowds - or lack thereof - have disappointed retailers nationwide this holiday shopping season. Sales from Black Friday through Sunday were down 8.2 percent from last year. For the week ending Dec. 17, the latest results available, sales were down 11.9 percent from last year, according to figures from the International Council of Shopping Centers in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 2, 1992
The last time you saw "Mr. Baseball," it was about detectives. The time before that it was about auto assembly workers. Lord knows how many permutations it went though before then.A rude, self-absorbed American is forced by unruly circumstances to engage the culture of Japan, with its emphasis on self-denial and team, its crunching work ethic, its elaborate social rituals of decorum of respect and its hunger for little bits of cold fish. First he whines, then he acts up and, finally, he melts down and, having absorbed the wisdom of the East, is somehow reborn with a Japanese soul and becomes a better man for it.The goat-hero this time is Tom Selleck, that amiable lug, and the milieu is not law enforcement as it was in "Black Rain" or automobile manufacturing as it was in "Gung Ho," but baseball.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | October 7, 1992
There were three absolutes in any episode of the television series "Magnum, P.I.," consistently one of the highest-rated shows during its eight-year run on CBS in the '80s: rolling Hawaiian surf; tall palm trees, and a Detroit Tigers "D" baseball cap perched on Tom Selleck's head.Mr. Selleck, a Michigander and a lifelong Tigers fan, wears that cap everywhere. It's his calling card (as if the 6-foot-4, wavy-haired hunk needed one). Last week, he traded the Detroit "D" in for a Chunichi Dragons "D" cap, as he trotted out to the field to play first base for the Japanese baseball team in his latest movie, "Mr. Baseball," which opened over the weekend.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder | November 22, 1990
There they were, slipping in the trenches of show biz, making movies they'd hope to live down and scrambling for one-liners. Probably nobody remembers that Ted Danson had a role as William Hurt's smarmy friend in "Body Heat" or that Tom Selleck muscled his way on screen as one of Mae West's hunks in "Myra Breckinridge."Both of them hit pay dirt on television, Danson with "Cheers" and Selleck, of course, with "Magnum, P.I." Danson says he has changed so much since he began on "Cheers" nine years ago that he can't even fathom the differences.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 19, 1990
IF WHAT THE movie audience really needs at the moment is a good western, they have it in ''Quigley Down Under.''The film, opening here today, takes place in Australia, where it was filmed. It is still, however, a true American western.It has all the familiar elements, a strong hero, a very nasty villain, the girl with the past, a throbbing music score and one standoff after another.And it is all immensely entertaining. Tom Selleck stars. He plays an American sharpshooter who answers a want ad, one that takes him to Australia where he hopes to work for a landowner.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 12, 1996
First, there was the noise. Then the smell of boiling rubber hose. Then the little red light. Then steam over the hood. Teresa Miller, 65 years old and driving a Mercury a third of her age, knew she was in trouble. Her '74 Comet was overheating on the Beltway -- coughing and wheezing and shaking, in the throes of death, if you know what I mean.So there's poor Teresa, stranded on the exit ramp near Frederick Road, on Sunday afternoon -- which was a hot and humid afternoon, as I recall -- with a fizzling Comet, $17 in her purse.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 21, 1990
'Three Menand a Little Lady'Starring Tom Selleck, Ted Danson and Steve Guttenberg.Directed by Emile Ardolino.Released by Touchstone.Rated PG.** In "Three Men and a Little Lady," Tom Selleck plays . . . I forget.But that's all right, because at least his co-star Ted Danson is . . . er . . . I forgot that one, too.The third guy is played by Steve . . . Steve . . . Steve Something. I can't remember.Anyway, the plot is about . . . oh, let's see . . . I think it's about these three guys, see, who are raising a baby . . . no, no, it's a little girl.
NEWS
May 23, 2000
Van Bokkelen Elementary School will present a miniversion of the Broadway musical "The Wiz" at 7 p.m. Thursday. The performance will feature fourth- and fifth-graders. The play will be staged in the school auditorium at 1140 Reece Road, Severn. Admission is free. Information: 410-222-6535. Students Corrinne Altman of Crofton, a senior majoring in dietetics in the College for Human Development of Syracuse University, received two honors at the college's awards convocation - the Selleck Award, recognizing exceptional personal qualities, significant service to the university and high academic standing; and the college's scholar award recognizing scholarly achievement, community service and professional integration of scholarly endeavors.
NEWS
By Tony Snow | May 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If you want to appreciate the culture of ignorance now flourishing in these United States, consider some recent pronouncements by Rosie O'Donnell and Spike Lee.Ms. O'Donnell is posing as the Joan of Arc of gun control, having experienced an epiphany when she sank her incisors into actor Tom Selleck, who was a "guest" on her syndicated talk show.Even though Mr. Selleck is the nicest guy in show business, she treated him like meat.As hausfraus and tourists shouted "You go, girl!"
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 29, 1999
I COULD KISS that Rosie O'Donnell. I really could. She may have started a trend. Because of O'Donnell, television talk shows may become worth viewing again.O'Donnell is host of a show that airs locally at 3 p.m., opposite the dreadful "Jerry Springer Show." Before last week, O'Donnell was dubbed the queen of nice. Typically, she interviews celebrities, lobs them softball questions and sits by while they promote whatever it is they've come on Rosie's show to promote.That ended when actor Tom Selleck appeared on the show to plug his new movie.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 23, 1998
For many viewers, seeing "The Closer" tonight is going to seem like anti-climax after they've been forced to witness 10,000 promotional spots for it during the Olympics. I wonder if such promotional overkill isn't the kiss of death for a new series -- engendering an unconscious resentment in viewers for having to hear the same canned laughter over and over. Does anyone remember "Fish Police"?Tom Selleck is better than any of the animated marine life law enforcement officers in that CBS wonder canceled after three episodes in 1992.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
Andy Griffith and Tom Selleck, returning to TV the same night? Must be some kind of planetary convergence or something."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Look who's back it's our old pal, Tom Selleck, a k a Monica's ex-boyfriend Richard. The two meet up again at the video store and start debating whether they can remain friends. Provided Selleck can fit the occasional guest appearance into his schedule, maybe they can. NBC."High Incident" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- El Camino's finest are out to stop a gang of thieves who not only break into homes but torture the people living there.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 12, 1996
First, there was the noise. Then the smell of boiling rubber hose. Then the little red light. Then steam over the hood. Teresa Miller, 65 years old and driving a Mercury a third of her age, knew she was in trouble. Her '74 Comet was overheating on the Beltway -- coughing and wheezing and shaking, in the throes of death, if you know what I mean.So there's poor Teresa, stranded on the exit ramp near Frederick Road, on Sunday afternoon -- which was a hot and humid afternoon, as I recall -- with a fizzling Comet, $17 in her purse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 23, 1990
Beverly Hills, Calif.Tom Selleck, Steve Guttenberg and Ted Danson actually enjoy talking to each other.And talking is the order of the day for the three stars of "Three Men and a Little Lady," which opened on Wednesday. They're supposed to feed chunks of chat to the huge crowd of entertainment journalists packing the ballroom of a chic Beverly Hills hotel. They don't have to talk to each other. They want to.During five-minute breaks as they move from table to table, Mr. Danson and Mr. Guttenberg put their heads together over a long table of these occasions' ubiquitous kiwi fruit.
SPORTS
April 5, 1991
But what did he do against Higgins?The Cincinnati Reds' Tim Layana broke thousands of hearts by striking out actor Tom Selleck to end the Detroit Tigers' eighth inning Wednesday night.Then the Reds rallied for four runs in the ninth to win the exhibition game, 6-4.The left-handed-hitting Selleck, who has been in the Tigers' camp in Lakeland, Fla., most of the spring researching a movie about baseball, was sent up as a pinch hitter for Rob Deer with two outs and Detroit leading, 4-2."My knees were shaking a little bit," Selleck said.
NEWS
July 31, 1995
Selleck wants stars to put lid on politicsActor Tom Selleck wants Hollywood celebrities like Barbra Streisand to stifle their liberal political views."
SPORTS
July 27, 1993
Jordan could have played for a songSunday at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Michael Jordan's hand-picked team of athletes lost, 7-1, in a charity softball game to Grammy Award-winning singer Michael Bolton and members of his band.Bolton's Bombers easily beat Jordan's Air Force for one simple reason: Bolton's musicians could play softball. They do frequently and successfully when they are on tour.Jordan's team was comprised of Magic Johnson and Stacey King from basketball, hockey's Chris Chelios, boxer Evander Holyfield, ex-football stars Ahmad Rashad and Mark Harmon and entertainers Hammer and Tom Selleck.
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