Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSelf Esteem
IN THE NEWS

Self Esteem

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 10, 2014
I'm 17 and I just wanted to let Alexandra Della Santina know how much I appreciate the fact that she and many others have begun to say things like this about young women's self-esteem and to write about it ("Don't hate me because I like myself," July 9). I've never had much of a problem with myself, but I know others who do, and it kills me to watch people hate so much about themselves. I just want you to know how much this means to people like me, even if (due to cultural norms or whatever)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2014
I'm 17 and I just wanted to let Alexandra Della Santina know how much I appreciate the fact that she and many others have begun to say things like this about young women's self-esteem and to write about it ("Don't hate me because I like myself," July 9). I've never had much of a problem with myself, but I know others who do, and it kills me to watch people hate so much about themselves. I just want you to know how much this means to people like me, even if (due to cultural norms or whatever)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twice a week, dozens of girls can be seen scampering along the track at Harper's Choice Middle School, a workout that will ultimately lead to a 5K run. Before their often-challenging cardio exercise, they take part in brief sessions centered on building self-confidence and reinforcing social skills. The 10-week after-school program, called Girls on the Run, teaches the third- to eighth-graders self-esteem, a healthy lifestyle and social skills while they train for the Girls on the Run Fall 5K on Dec. 1 in Columbia.
NEWS
By Alexandra Della Santina | July 8, 2014
I think I'm pretty. A sharp pang of embarrassment strikes me as I type these words. My heart rate elevates and a flush runs up my neck and blossoms across my cheeks. My first instinct is to go back and delete those incriminating four words, purging them as if they never existed. I figure the least I can do is qualify them. I want to pull out a grocery list of criticisms I have about how I look: I hate how my thighs brush together when I walk, I hate the softness of my belly, I hate the slight fuzz that rests along my upper lip, I hate the perpetual rosiness that splatters across my cheeks.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Perched on her skates, Justise Fleming watched intently as her instructor spun around on the ice with ease. Then the determined 7-year-old from Patterson Park dug her right toe pick into the ice, reached back and swiveled in place. As her spin slowed she wobbled a bit like a tightrope walker on the high wire. But a sly smile of accomplishment spread across her face. A few feet away, 14 other girls tried the same two-foot spin. Most succeeded, but several plopped down hard. A few shrieks pierced the cold air of the Dominic Mimi DiPietro Family Skating Center in Patterson Park.
FEATURES
By Barbara Turk, M.S | February 4, 1992
You've got it: low self-esteem. And you'd like to get rid of it. It says somewhere you should practice feeling good about yourself. You think that's dumb and about as helpful as telling you to look up a word in the dictionary when you don't know how to spell it in the first place!You're right, because if you knew how to feel good about yourself (which is having good self-esteem), you wouldn't have the problem in the first place.So, how do you boost your self-esteem?*First, identify your personal programming (everyone's different)
NEWS
By Andrew Ferguson | June 29, 1995
NOBODY HAS yet suggested that Timothy McVeigh, the accused Oklahoma City bomber, suffers from low self-esteem, but it's only a matter of time.You'll hear it soon from his lawyer, or some rent-an-expert shrink.Or maybe it will be Oprah -- Oprah in the generic sense, as one of the dozens of daytime talk-show Barnums whose job is to display a parade of freaks in order to massage the emotions of TV-addled countrymen.Perhaps McVeigh himself will take the stage and tearfully recount beatings from a psycho dad and icy stares from a boozebag mom.Oprahphilsallyjessygeraldo will diagnose yet another instance of the dysfunction of the decade: "Tim -- may I call you Tim?
NEWS
By T. Berry Brazelton, m.d. and T. Berry Brazelton, m.d.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | August 5, 2001
Q. My 11-year-old grandson has problems getting and keeping friends. If anyone says anything negative to him, he begins to cry. He says kids are mean to him, but I've seen him treat his peers badly. He spent most of last summer at my house. (He lives only a few blocks away.) It became a problem when another grandson from out of town came to visit. He got very jealous and treated his cousin terribly. When I confronted his parents (my son and daughter-in-law) they attacked me and said terrible things to me. Our relationship has not been the same since.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 24, 2004
IN THE HOURS after that terrible night of April 4, 1968, when despair and rage set in among many black Americans - while others just hunkered down for all the hell that we knew was going to break loose - one woman had a different reaction. Willia Bland decided she would start a modeling agency. She had turned to modeling when she was 30 - "a time when life was over for women at age 30," Bland said recently - and remembered what it had done for her self-esteem. "You have to look at the historical perspective of what was going on," Bland said.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
Tamieko Ross sits in a rocking chair, greeting a steady stream of preschool children who come into the Little Bear Nursery at Hammond High School."Hi, Jamal, hi, Jay," the 17-year-old says to a couple of boys who come bouncing into the room. To a little girl in a plaid dress and matching red and white hair ribbons, she says: "Oh, Lauren, you look very pretty today."Tamieko is not only enhancing the preschoolers' self-esteem, she is building her own as well.Under a 4-year-old partnership with Howard County General Hospital, students at three public high schools are learning how to develop their own self-esteem by teaching preschool children colors, ABCs, and numbers.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Sprawled out on their stomachs or hunched over pieces of paper, two dozen preteens gathered in the cool darkness of the theater stage and mulled over what kind of legacy they would leave behind. Tracie Jiggetts, responsible for helping to shape their self-confidence and social skills at a two-week summer camp held at Towson University, paced the floor and prompted the children to say how they wanted to be remembered when the camp ends Thursday. "I wanted to leave behind my positive attitude and I want people to remember me for my kindness," one girl said in a near-whisper.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  AMOUR-PROPRE One hazard in those well-meant efforts to build up the self-esteem of the young (all those attaboys, all those certificates and trophies, more even than journalists hand out) is winding up with too much of it.  We have a word for that, amour-propre  (pronounced ah-moor-PRO-pr')
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Robert Cradle had achieved his goal of owning a successful barbershop with an Odenton establishment that employed seven full-time workers and served a steady stream of customers coming in for that just-right haircut. But even as he made his business dream come true, he also noticed a steady stream of people taking up residence at an adjacent homeless shelter. Cradle discovered that many at the shelter couldn't afford to maintain good grooming habits while they were struggling to get back on their feet.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
IndyCar racing reminds me of the prettiest girl in school. She's the one who set the standard for "cool" and the one who everyone dreamed of dating. We want IndyCar in Charm City because we think it will put us in the cool group with the other popular cities ("Race to remove Grand Prix barriers," Sept. 3). In an attempt to win the prettiest girl's affection, I can remember carrying extra books, wearing ridiculous things like parachute pants and admitting to watching "Melrose Place," much like I put up with closed roads, barriers keeping me in my neighborhood, incredibly loud noises and extra traffic in the heart of downtown on a long weekend, all with the intention of grabbing her attention and hoping that maybe she'll love me back.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 25, 2013
What if Facebook isn't the intrusive, all-seeing eye that we fear? What if it isn't just a place where workers waste time and young people post regrettable pictures of themselves? What if it is not just a stage for narcissists who think everything they say is funny and everything they do is important? What if isn't just a place where heartless teens wound each other? What if Facebook is an Internet bar where everybody knows your name, where you can go to feel better after a bad day?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Twice a week, dozens of girls can be seen scampering along the track at Harper's Choice Middle School, a workout that will ultimately lead to a 5K run. Before their often-challenging cardio exercise, they take part in brief sessions centered on building self-confidence and reinforcing social skills. The 10-week after-school program, called Girls on the Run, teaches the third- to eighth-graders self-esteem, a healthy lifestyle and social skills while they train for the Girls on the Run Fall 5K on Dec. 1 in Columbia.
NEWS
By David Bloom and David Bloom,Los Angeles Daily News | March 13, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- The big question is, to paraphrase Ronald Reagan, do you feel better about yourself now than you did eight years ago?That's when self-esteem as savior hit California government, to the hoots of Johnny Carson and "Doonesbury" -- and the earnest protestations of supporters who believed that efforts to build self-esteem and personal responsibility could help cure everything from welfare dependency to war.Now, hundreds of thousands of dollars and...
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2000
ACCORDING TO Wendy Walker, training coordinator of the Baltimore City Child Care Resource Center, it's never too early to begin to build a child's self-esteem. "Parents should really start while the child is in the womb," she says. To assist parents, Walker will lead a workshop, "Winning Ways of Working With Young Children, Boosting Their Self-Esteem," at 10: 30 a.m. Thursday at the Brooklyn branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Washington maintains that children understand more than adults give them credit for and are able to pick up on little mannerisms that most adults would think go unnoticed.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | June 7, 2011
Most of us might feel overwhelmed owing tens of thousands of dollars. Not college students. A study by Ohio State University, found that young adults not only see debt as positive, but being in hock boosted their self-esteem. The more credit card and college loan debt they held, the “higher their self-esteem and the more they felt like they were in control of their lives,” according to a release about the study. These feelings were more pronounced among students from low-income families, the study found.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Perched on her skates, Justise Fleming watched intently as her instructor spun around on the ice with ease. Then the determined 7-year-old from Patterson Park dug her right toe pick into the ice, reached back and swiveled in place. As her spin slowed she wobbled a bit like a tightrope walker on the high wire. But a sly smile of accomplishment spread across her face. A few feet away, 14 other girls tried the same two-foot spin. Most succeeded, but several plopped down hard. A few shrieks pierced the cold air of the Dominic Mimi DiPietro Family Skating Center in Patterson Park.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.