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November 9, 2005
Tonight at 6:30 p.m., poet Tonya Maria Matthews (also known by her stage name JaHipster) will read from and sign her book Still Swingin': New and Selected Poems. The event takes place at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Call 410-396-5494 for more information.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 16, 2010
As admirers and friends of the late Lucille Clifton, a former poet laureate of Maryland, continued to mourn her passing, plans were finalized Tuesday for a pair of memorial services in her honor -- one for family and close friends, the other for the public. The first gathering will be held at noon Thursday at the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center in Columbia, the town that Clifton, a native of upstate New York, had adopted as her home many years ago. The public memorial is scheduled for April 10, at 7:30 p.m., in Montgomery Hall on the campus of St. Mary's College of Maryland on the western shore of Chesapeake Bay, where Clifton had been a member of the faculty from 1989 until she retired in 2007.
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NEWS
By D. R. Fair | March 14, 1994
SELECTED POEMS. By Rita Dove. Random House. 210 pages, paperback. $12.THROUGH THE IVORY GATE. By Rita Dove. Random House. 278 pages, paperback. $11.MAYBE I don't understand the concept of "selected poems." I went through the table of contents of "Selected Poems," by U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove (the first African American and, at 41, youngest to be named to the position), and I was confused. I saw the poems from "The Yellow House on the Corner," her first collection published in 1980. I saw the poems from "Museum," published in 1983.
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 6, 2008
Poet and essayist Lia Purpura is about to publish her latest book of poetry, King Baby, which she describes as "a conversation with some knowing kind of force." Due out later this month, the collection has won the Beatrice Hawley Award from Alice James Books. Purpura, a writer-in-residence at Loyola College, says many authors have influenced her writing and her life, but three stand out. "These are three books that shocked me awake, made me want to write better, to live more intensely in a daily way," she says.
NEWS
By TED KOOSER | May 14, 2006
A worm in an apple, a maggot in a bone, a person in the world. What might seem an odd assortment of creatures is beautifully interelated by the Massachusetts poet Pat Schneider. Her poem suggests that each lving thing is richly awake to its own particular, limited world.__ Ted Kooser There is another way to enter an apple: a worm's way. The small, round door closes behind her. The world and all its necessities ripen around her like a room. In the sweet marrow of a bone, the maggot does not remember the wingspread of the mother, the green shine of her body, nor even the last breath of the dying deer.
NEWS
By TED KOOSER | February 26, 2006
The poet, novelist and biographer Robert Morgan, who was raised in North Carolina, has written many intriguing poems that teach his readers about Southern folklore. Here's one example. "Holy Cussing" When the most intense revivals swept the mountains just a century ago, participants described the shouts and barks in unknown tongues, the jerks of those who tried to climb the walls, the holy dance and laugh. But strangest are reports of what was called the holy cuss. Sometimes a man who spoke in tongues and leapt for joy would break into an avalanche of cursing that would stun with brilliance and duration.
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | April 6, 2008
Poet and essayist Lia Purpura is about to publish her latest book of poetry, King Baby, which she describes as "a conversation with some knowing kind of force." Due out later this month, the collection has won the Beatrice Hawley Award from Alice James Books. Purpura, a writer-in-residence at Loyola College, says many authors have influenced her writing and her life, but three stand out. "These are three books that shocked me awake, made me want to write better, to live more intensely in a daily way," she says.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 27, 1996
There she sits on a stool, her hands clasped and wearing black slacks and a striped shirt that seems way too big for that diminutive body. The smile is almost pixieish and mischievous, as though she knows something we don't.It's the cover picture on Nikki Giovanni's new book, "The Selected Poems of Nikki Giovanni."Tonight , Giovanni will be at the Bibelot book and music store in Pikesville on the second stop of her 10-city tour, reading poetry and autographing copies of her book to promote her latest literary effort.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL COLLIER | November 11, 1990
The Past, The Future, The Present:Poems Selected and New.Reed Whittemore.University of Arkansas.175 pages. $29.95. In this book, we see how Maryland's poet laureate and former poetry consultant to the Library of Congress takes account of his more than four decades of poetry writing. From Reed Whittemore's nine previous collections of poetry, including two earlier selected poems ("Poems New and Selected," 1963 and "The Feel of Rock: Poems of Three Decades," 1982), he has fashioned a modest though strongly representative volume of 90 poems.
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | December 10, 1996
WHENEVER I GO to a beautiful place I imagine myself living there. I went to Boone, North Carolina, a mountain-sheltered paradise where rustic craftsmen sell quilts from shops that smell like pine. On the way there, Moravian cookie makers in 16th-century clothes sell you paper-thin ginger wafers. They bake them in the huge ovens that scared the daylights out of Hansel and Gretel.What is it with paradise that inspires instant terror? I asked Lynn Doyle, local poet and observer, after we bought these great cookies.
NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,Los Angeles Times | January 28, 2007
Novels set in Africa and India, modern-day New Jersey and the stark landscape of a post-apocalyptic world will vie for the best work of fiction published in 2006, in nominations announced last week for the National Book Critics Circle awards. The winner will be named in March; awards will also be given in nonfiction, biography, poetry, memoir and criticism. The National Book Critics Circle, founded in 1974, is a nonprofit made up of nearly 700 book reviewers across the nation. The fiction nominees were Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie for Half of a Yellow Sun (Alfred Knopf)
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2006
The Illinois poet Lisel Mueller is one of our country's finest writers, and the following lines, with their grace and humility, are representative of her poems of quiet celebration. - Ted Kooser Outside the house the wind is howling and the trees are creaking horribly. This is an old story with its old beginning, as I lay me down to sleep. But when I wake up, sunlight has taken over the room. You have already made the coffee and the radio brings us music from a confident age. In the paper bad news is set in distant places.
NEWS
By TED KOOSER | February 26, 2006
The poet, novelist and biographer Robert Morgan, who was raised in North Carolina, has written many intriguing poems that teach his readers about Southern folklore. Here's one example. "Holy Cussing" When the most intense revivals swept the mountains just a century ago, participants described the shouts and barks in unknown tongues, the jerks of those who tried to climb the walls, the holy dance and laugh. But strangest are reports of what was called the holy cuss. Sometimes a man who spoke in tongues and leapt for joy would break into an avalanche of cursing that would stun with brilliance and duration.
FEATURES
November 9, 2005
Tonight at 6:30 p.m., poet Tonya Maria Matthews (also known by her stage name JaHipster) will read from and sign her book Still Swingin': New and Selected Poems. The event takes place at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. Call 410-396-5494 for more information.
NEWS
By Fritz Lanham and Fritz Lanham,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | November 10, 2001
HOUSTON - "A poem should not mean but be," Archibald MacLeish famously observed, and for a long time the same could be said for America's poet laureate. He or she didn't do much, at least not publicly. Holders of the post, created by Congress in 1937, gave the odd reading or lecture before a high-toned Washington, D.C., audience. They advised the librarian of Congress if he felt he needed advice. That was about it. Howard Nemerov (1963-1964 and 1988-1990) said the poet laureate was a very busy person because he spent most of his time explaining what the poet laureate did. Robert Penn Warren (1986-1987)
FEATURES
September 25, 2001
In the weeks after the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, images have seared our collective conscience. But so too have words. We asked four Maryland poets to share the verses that have haunted them since Sept. 11, 2001. The poems they chose couldn't be more different. Some have the anguished weight and force of prophecy. Others look to past traumas to provide lessons for the present. And others manage to transform a heartbreakingly painful event into something beautiful, to find solace in a visceral expression of fear.
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