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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
There will be no soup for you but plenty of free eats as the "No Soup for You" truck pulls into Baltimore today. The truck -- an homage to the famous "Seinfeld"  episode featuring The Soup Nazi -- will be parked at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore from noon to 2 p.m. The truck is touring the country and has already stopped in a number of cities -- Boston, New York and Chicago, to name a few. The truck, alas, won't have the Nazi's...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | April 22, 1992
The best comedy flows from real-life experiences, and nobody on television is tapping that vein better these days than "Seinfeld," the NBC series that tonight at 9 and 9:30 gives viewers a double feature of back-to-back episodes on WMAR (Channel 2).Star Jerry Seinfeld built his stand-up comedy reputation on the ,, "didja' ever notice . . ." school of observational humor, and tonight's first episode tackles a commonplace urban stress: the hunt for a good parking place.Along the way, it also proves another formula for a successful comedy series: By reaching back to "The Honeymooners" and "I Love Lucy," the show demonstrates the need for a strong ensemble cast of almost-believable characters.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 5, 2014
The seemingly endless battle of the suit sellers - Jos. A. Bank Clothiers and Men's Wearhouse - caught the attention of Jerry Seinfeld, and the comedian is  fascinated and amused. The former Seinfeld star and co-creator was asked about the huge merger fight between the nation's two biggest men's apparel chains during a CBS interview Tuesday. "Jos. A. Bank - could they advertise more? Could they sell less?" Seinfeld said on BuzzFeed Brews on CBS This Morning. "They're just like, 'We'll give you three suits for $8. We'll give you… Just take it. Just take it, and get it out of here.'" Men's Wearhouse, the bigger of the two rivals, took an equal amount of ribbing.
FEATURES
By Carole Goldberg and Carole Goldberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2002
He was into Scientology. He's never been true to his school. He used to spend hours preparing his face for a shave. He has control issues, is remarkably focused and has rarely made a misstep in his ascent to America's comedy pantheon. And, says one author, Jerry Seinfeld made every effort to persuade people not to cooperate with the unauthorized biography that contains such facts. Seinfeld: The Making of an American Icon (HarperCollins) by Jerry Oppenheimer, chronicles the childhood, early career and phenomenal rise of the man who created, in the guise of "a show about nothing," the gotta-watch-it sitcom that TV Guide called "the No. 1 comedy of all time."
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | May 13, 1998
THERE is something absolutely annoying about the way some culture gurus take for granted that, come tomorrow night, we will all sit glued to our televisions watching the last episode of "Seinfeld."To do otherwise is to be uncivilized, un-American, someone unworthy of calling herself a New Yorker.Well, excuse me. I have been a New Yorker for 22 years. But I am not a "Seinfeld" fan. And, from what I have gathered from various folks I've talked to in recent days, I am not alone.I am not one of those snobs who insist that they never watch television.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
You want soup? Then watch "Seinfeld" tonight and obey the rules."High Incident" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- In this repeat from April, David Keith's Sgt. Jim Marsh, one of the world's most obsessive cops, is forced to discipline his daughter when she breaks the law. ABC."Miracle Babies" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The insufferable Kathie Lee Gifford serves as host for this round-up of children whose very births defied the odds. Included is a look at 51-year-old Vivian McDonnell of Bel Air, who was implanted with her 31-year-old daughter's eggs and gave birth to triplets -- her own grandchildren.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
Bob and Jack launch their big show tonight, as the GOP convention concludes with acceptance speeches from nominees Dole and Kemp. Network coverage begins at 9 p.m., except on NBC, where even stronger forces are at work."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | August 9, 1998
Personally, I think it's enough already with Seinfeld. He's taking way too long to say goodbye. But for those who disagree, there's "Jerry Seinfeld: I'm Telling You for the Last Time" tonight at 9 on HBO. It's Seinfeld live on Broadway at the end of his world tour performing his current crop of stand-up material for what he promises will be the last time. He does plan to return to stand-up, but not until he has a new act.I'll watch, but only because the brittle "Seinfeld" finale left me with such a bad taste in my mouth.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 16, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- "Seinfeld" will return for an eighth season next fall, NBC entertainment president Warren Littlefield said yesterday.The announcement came as somewhat of surprise since Jerry Seinfeld and other members of the cast were reportedly considering calling it quits after seven years in the Nielsen Top 10.As Littlefield spoke, Seinfeld walked on stage to field questions in a surprise press conference."
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
There will be no soup for you but plenty of free eats as the "No Soup for You" truck pulls into Baltimore today. The truck -- an homage to the famous "Seinfeld"  episode featuring The Soup Nazi -- will be parked at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore from noon to 2 p.m. The truck is touring the country and has already stopped in a number of cities -- Boston, New York and Chicago, to name a few. The truck, alas, won't have the Nazi's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
It's a cold, gray Friday afternoon in a dark and drafty concrete warehouse at an industrial park in Columbia. Not exactly the setting in which anyone would expect to find glamour, wit or the next big thing in pop culture. But through a series of doors built into a maze of temporary walls and stage flats, there's a group of a dozen tall director's chairs bearing Vice President of the United States seals set in two ragged rows along with a bank of TV monitors and warming lights. And in the center of the first row, sitting sideways in a black power suit coat and skirt, legs casually crossed, is Julia Louis-Dreyfus, star of HBO's new political satire "VEEP.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker | October 27, 2011
Coveted power forward Mitch McGary says in his ESPN blog that he loves Maryland, but it's not a good fit. Is that like that old Seinfeld breakup line: "It"s not you, it"s me?" As of August, the Brewster (N.H.) Academy center was still including Maryland on his list of finalists. He had suggested that he didn't mind a school transitioning to a new coach. But in his blog today, he wrote: "I love Maryland, but I just don't think that it's the best fit for me. " He said he was focusing on Florida, Duke and Michigan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 14, 2011
In a special guest appearance on "The Daily Show," legendary comedian Jerry Seinfeld had some help for Jon Stewart.  Stewart, you see, was trying to overcome his more juvenile self -- which wanted to accuse GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann's husband, Marcus, of hypocritically being gay as he tried to "pray the gay" out of people.  As evidence, Stewart played a clip of Marcus Bachmann swing-dancing with Michele and also a...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 18, 2009
In an interview this week, Larry David, creator of "Curb Your Enthusiasm," answered a question from me about matters of taste by saying, "And the more people I can offend, the better." If that is the standard, then Sunday's premiere of the seventh season of this HBO comedy is the best. Right out of the box, David is absolutely pushing the limits of TV comedy on issues of race, gender, coarse language, mental illness and physical disease. You don't realize how incredibly edgy David's work on HBO is until you try to write about it in a family newspaper and suddenly discover that you can barely start to describe situations and setups, let alone dialogue and punch lines.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | March 7, 2009
'Seinfeld' stars plan 'Enthusiasm' reunion Their Seinfeld isn't coming back, but its stars will be together again this fall on HBO. The network says that Jerry Seinfeld, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Jason Alexander and Michael Richards will appear in several episodes of Curb Your Enthusiasm. The HBO comedy stars Larry David, who helped create Seinfeld. HBO wasn't giving out any other details about the appearances, which were first reported on the Entertainment Weekly Web site. Conrad moving on The Hills will no longer be alive with the drama of Lauren Conrad - at least, after the fifth season.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | May 16, 1998
Based on overnight ratings from major cities, NBC is estimating that 76 million people watched the final episode of "Seinfeld."The "Seinfeld" finale had a 43.2 rating and 57 share in Nielsen Media Research's overnight ratings of 39 major markets, NBC said yesterday.The final episode of "Cheers" in 1993 had a 45.9 rating and 72 share in the national ratings, with an estimated 80 million viewers.The all-time champ of final series episodes is M*A*S*H, which had a 60.2 rating and 77 share, with an estimated 105 million viewers, when it went off the air in 1983.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 10, 1994
All things come to those who wait: Specific episodes of "The Simpsons" and "Seinfeld," bounced from the schedule a few weeks ago after the earthquake hit California, finally are presented tonight. Their descriptions may evoke feelings of deja vu, but trust me: The first chance to vu these two shows occurs tonight.* "Mad About You" (8-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Another flashback episode, this one reaching back to the day Paul (Paul Reiser) proposed to Jamie (Helen Hunt). NBC.* "Gunsmoke: One Man's Justice" (8-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
SPORTS
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 10, 2009
Do you know that the driveway at President Andrew Jackson's Nashville home, Hermitage, is the shape of a guitar? Do you care? Of course not. Some other "fun facts": NASHVILLE Violence-prone citizens Tennessee's nickname, the "Volunteer State," comes from the War of 1812, when hundreds of volunteers - many more than the quota needed, many surely from Nashville - eagerly went off to war We're No. 7! In a 2007 U.S. News & World Report ranking of the 100 busiest airports, Nashville was named the seventh "least miserable" airport.
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