Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSeine
IN THE NEWS

Seine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 13, 1996
The Phillips Collection in Washington is an assemblage of masterpieces of modern art. It has great paintings by Cezanne, van Gogh, Picasso, Braque, Kandinsky, and on and on -- you name the modern master and they most likely have pictures by him, often famous ones. But the most famous of them all is Renoir's "Luncheon of the Boating Party" (1880-1881), that icon of impressionism, that glorious picture of a happy group of people gathered to eat, drink and be merry on a sunny afternoon.There are many reasons for its appeal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A tiny landscape by Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir was returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art Friday afternoon - more than 62 years after the artwork mysteriously disappeared while it was on exhibition. FBI investigators drove to the museum on North Charles Street to personally hand over "Paysage Bords de Seine," museum spokeswoman Anne Mannix Brown said. The 1879 painting, which had been held for the past 16 months in a northern Virginia warehouse for safekeeping, immediately was whisked off to the conservation lab so that it can be examined for any necessary cleaning, stabilization measures, or repairs.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 18, 2005
PARIS - Nothing quite says "Paris" in the hearts of dreamers like cozy apartments overlooking lush gardens with trickling fountains, or lazy conversations conducted while sipping coffee in outdoor cafes along the Seine. And nothing quite says Paris in the minds of realists these days as this: Apartments are affordable to almost nobody, and cafes are being enveloped by the thick, belching smoke of traffic going nowhere quick. The City of Light is becoming a difficult place to live. It might still remain a refuge for artists, for struggling musicians busking in subway tunnels, for lovers in love with love.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
The case of a small painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art decades ago took an unexpected turn recently when new questions were raised about a woman's claim that she bought it at a flea market. The holes in her story should cement the BMA's legal efforts to reclaim its property after all these years, but the strange tale also throws a fascinating light on the pitfalls that inevitably arise in any dealings with artworks of mysterious provenance.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | October 22, 1994
Paris.--The stately 19th-century apartment houses have front doors with security key pads. You hit five keys in correct sequence to get in.So people need more than street and phone numbers in their address books. They have the security code of friends whom they visit.Many folks have not just a telephone but a Minitel, a micro-computer hooked to the phone that comes free. Phone books are obsolete. You use the Minitel, free, to get directory assistance.The catch is that then you use it to buy train tickets and make theater reservations and pay for that usage.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
The case of a small painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir stolen from the Baltimore Museum of Art decades ago took an unexpected turn recently when new questions were raised about a woman's claim that she bought it at a flea market. The holes in her story should cement the BMA's legal efforts to reclaim its property after all these years, but the strange tale also throws a fascinating light on the pitfalls that inevitably arise in any dealings with artworks of mysterious provenance.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | July 9, 1997
PARIS -- It is impossible to feel frazzled or hurried on the Ile Saint-Louis, a small island of glorious 17th-century architecture, captivating shops and long, narrow streets lined with elegant residences.This thought occurred recently to an American visitor -- we shall call her Madame S. -- while sitting in a cafe overlooking the Seine. After almost two weeks in Paris, Madame S. had arrived at the point where she was feeling a bit overscheduled and in need of a vacation within a vacation.
NEWS
September 5, 1997
THE MOST hopeful portent for resumption of Northern Ireland negotiations is the behavior of the Ulster Unionist Party, led by David Trimble. The party with the largest support in the province, the main voice of the majority Protestants who want to remain in the United Kingdom, will be there.It will not be intimidated by the boycott of the extremist rival for loyalist votes, the Rev. Ian Paisley. The party has made a show of consulting all religious groups. On Monday, Mr. Trimble met with the Roman Catholic primate of all Ireland, Archbishop Sean Brady, which no Unionist predecessor had done.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A tiny landscape by Impressionist master Pierre-Auguste Renoir was returned to the Baltimore Museum of Art Friday afternoon - more than 62 years after the artwork mysteriously disappeared while it was on exhibition. FBI investigators drove to the museum on North Charles Street to personally hand over "Paysage Bords de Seine," museum spokeswoman Anne Mannix Brown said. The 1879 painting, which had been held for the past 16 months in a northern Virginia warehouse for safekeeping, immediately was whisked off to the conservation lab so that it can be examined for any necessary cleaning, stabilization measures, or repairs.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Richard Irwin and Mark Ribbing contributed to this article | May 15, 1998
Thousands of Baltimore residents who were just settling down to watch the grand finale of "Seinfeld" last night ended up pointing their clickers at blank television screens, incredulous and infuriated, as a power outage struck the city at the worst possible moment.Some 17,000 utility customers in North, Northeast and Northwest Baltimore lost power about 6 p.m. -- then lost it again after televisions flickered to life for a 20-minute tease from about 8: 20 p.m. to 8: 40 p.m.The special 75-minute "Seinfeld" started at 8: 45 p.m.An unknown number of Baltimore residents retained their electric power but lost their cable service and, with it, their plans to watch the much-ballyhooed program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
A "lost" landscape thought to have been painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir will go on the auction block Sept. 29 on behalf of the Baltimore-born woman who purchased the artwork at a West Virginia flea market for $7. "Paysage Bords de Seine," a 6-inch by 10-inch canvas dating from about 1879, is expected to fetch $75,000 to $100,000, according to Anne Norton Craner, the fine arts specialist for the Potomack Company, the Alexandria, Va., auction house...
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 18, 2005
PARIS - Nothing quite says "Paris" in the hearts of dreamers like cozy apartments overlooking lush gardens with trickling fountains, or lazy conversations conducted while sipping coffee in outdoor cafes along the Seine. And nothing quite says Paris in the minds of realists these days as this: Apartments are affordable to almost nobody, and cafes are being enveloped by the thick, belching smoke of traffic going nowhere quick. The City of Light is becoming a difficult place to live. It might still remain a refuge for artists, for struggling musicians busking in subway tunnels, for lovers in love with love.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Richard Irwin and Mark Ribbing contributed to this article | May 15, 1998
Thousands of Baltimore residents who were just settling down to watch the grand finale of "Seinfeld" last night ended up pointing their clickers at blank television screens, incredulous and infuriated, as a power outage struck the city at the worst possible moment.Some 17,000 utility customers in North, Northeast and Northwest Baltimore lost power about 6 p.m. -- then lost it again after televisions flickered to life for a 20-minute tease from about 8: 20 p.m. to 8: 40 p.m.The special 75-minute "Seinfeld" started at 8: 45 p.m.An unknown number of Baltimore residents retained their electric power but lost their cable service and, with it, their plans to watch the much-ballyhooed program.
NEWS
September 5, 1997
THE MOST hopeful portent for resumption of Northern Ireland negotiations is the behavior of the Ulster Unionist Party, led by David Trimble. The party with the largest support in the province, the main voice of the majority Protestants who want to remain in the United Kingdom, will be there.It will not be intimidated by the boycott of the extremist rival for loyalist votes, the Rev. Ian Paisley. The party has made a show of consulting all religious groups. On Monday, Mr. Trimble met with the Roman Catholic primate of all Ireland, Archbishop Sean Brady, which no Unionist predecessor had done.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | July 9, 1997
PARIS -- It is impossible to feel frazzled or hurried on the Ile Saint-Louis, a small island of glorious 17th-century architecture, captivating shops and long, narrow streets lined with elegant residences.This thought occurred recently to an American visitor -- we shall call her Madame S. -- while sitting in a cafe overlooking the Seine. After almost two weeks in Paris, Madame S. had arrived at the point where she was feeling a bit overscheduled and in need of a vacation within a vacation.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 13, 1996
The Phillips Collection in Washington is an assemblage of masterpieces of modern art. It has great paintings by Cezanne, van Gogh, Picasso, Braque, Kandinsky, and on and on -- you name the modern master and they most likely have pictures by him, often famous ones. But the most famous of them all is Renoir's "Luncheon of the Boating Party" (1880-1881), that icon of impressionism, that glorious picture of a happy group of people gathered to eat, drink and be merry on a sunny afternoon.There are many reasons for its appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
A "lost" landscape thought to have been painted by Pierre-Auguste Renoir will go on the auction block Sept. 29 on behalf of the Baltimore-born woman who purchased the artwork at a West Virginia flea market for $7. "Paysage Bords de Seine," a 6-inch by 10-inch canvas dating from about 1879, is expected to fetch $75,000 to $100,000, according to Anne Norton Craner, the fine arts specialist for the Potomack Company, the Alexandria, Va., auction house...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 9, 2000
Madeline, the smallest and most precocious of Miss Clavel's 12 Parisian students, is at it again. From escapades with Gypsies to tumbling into the Seine, the mini mischief-maker just can't seem to sit still. Her antics have hundreds of girls simply "Mad About Madeline," and the Eldersburg Branch Library knows it. The library is holding a Mad About Madeline celebration Saturday at which children ages 3 to 6 can take a stroll through France with the little girl in the yellow hat. Stories and activities begin at 10 a.m.; registration required.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | October 22, 1994
Paris.--The stately 19th-century apartment houses have front doors with security key pads. You hit five keys in correct sequence to get in.So people need more than street and phone numbers in their address books. They have the security code of friends whom they visit.Many folks have not just a telephone but a Minitel, a micro-computer hooked to the phone that comes free. Phone books are obsolete. You use the Minitel, free, to get directory assistance.The catch is that then you use it to buy train tickets and make theater reservations and pay for that usage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.