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By DAN RODRICKS | February 11, 1998
Georgia Tech basketball players might dribble over a McDonald's logo on their way down court at Alexander Memorial Coliseum in Atlanta, but don't look for the floor at Cole Field House to be junked up with the Golden Arches any time soon. Not if state Sen. Paul Pinsky's proposal to prohibit promotions at College Park passes.The Prince George's County politician thinks it's unseemly to have crass commercialism in the athletic facilities of public universities. With a multimillion-dollar replacement for Cole in the works - and talk about raising $25 million by selling the new arena's name to a private company - Pinsky has filed a bill to prohibit the University of Maryland and other state colleges from accepting private donations in exchange for naming rights.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 22, 1998
In one of the rare instances in which writing about classical music gets noticed, a piece by music critic Greg Sandow about the Boston Symphony and its music director, Seiji Ozawa, in the Wall Street Journal last week has caused a storm in Beantown.Comparing the orchestra to "a painting that badly needs to be restored," Sandow, without using a single named source to support his assessment, insisted that the celebrated orchestra now has "the worst reputation of any American orchestra."Ozawa's concerts, according to Sandow, were "dismaying"; the conductor himself was "a samurai" who was kept in place because "he raises Japanese money the BSO can't do without."
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 22, 1998
In one of the rare instances in which writing about classical music gets noticed, a piece by music critic Greg Sandow about the Boston Symphony and its music director, Seiji Ozawa, in the Wall Street Journal last week has caused a storm in Beantown.Comparing the orchestra to "a painting that badly needs to be restored," Sandow, without using a single named source to support his assessment, insisted that the celebrated orchestra now has "the worst reputation of any American orchestra."Ozawa's concerts, according to Sandow, were "dismaying"; the conductor himself was "a samurai" who was kept in place because "he raises Japanese money the BSO can't do without."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 11, 1998
Georgia Tech basketball players might dribble over a McDonald's logo on their way down court at Alexander Memorial Coliseum in Atlanta, but don't look for the floor at Cole Field House to be junked up with the Golden Arches any time soon. Not if state Sen. Paul Pinsky's proposal to prohibit promotions at College Park passes.The Prince George's County politician thinks it's unseemly to have crass commercialism in the athletic facilities of public universities. With a multimillion-dollar replacement for Cole in the works - and talk about raising $25 million by selling the new arena's name to a private company - Pinsky has filed a bill to prohibit the University of Maryland and other state colleges from accepting private donations in exchange for naming rights.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
Michael Figures, 48, president pro tem of the Alabama Senate, died Friday in Mobile after surgery on an aneurysm. A Mobile Democrat, he was the second-ranking member of the state Senate to which he was elected in 1978. He founded the Alabama New South Coalition in the 1980s to promote liberal causes and candidates.Eleazar de Carvalho, 84, a conductor who taught maestros Zubin Mehta, Seiji Ozawa and Claudio Abbado, died of cancer Thursday in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Carvalho made his overseas debut conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1957 and has conducted the orchestras of Berlin and Vienna.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Olga Spessivtzeva, a Russian ballerina acclaimed as one of the finest interpreters of "Giselle," died Monday of pneumonia in Valley Cottage, N.Y. She was 96. Miss Spessivtzeva danced with the Maryinsky Ballet, now known as the Kirov, and with Sergei Diaghilev's Ballet Russes. She gave her last performance in 1937.Zino Francescatti, a violinist who was one of France's most celebrated classical musicians, died Tuesday at his home in France. Mr. Francescatti, who was 89, made his debut at the Paris Opera in 1925 and quickly became a featured soloist in European capitals.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | June 15, 2001
The National Symphony Orchestra has appointed Nurit Bar-Josef as concertmaster, starting with the 2001-2002 season. Currently assistant concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops, Bar-Josef succeeds William Steck, who retired from the NSO after nearly 20 years. Music director Leonard Slatkin praised Bar-Josef's "great artistic integrity and leadership skills" in a statement yesterday, and also saluted Elisabeth Adkins, the orchestra's current associate concertmaster and one of the four finalists - all women, coincidentally - for the position.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | April 15, 2001
Lang Lang. Works by Haydn, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Balakirev, Rachmaninoff. (Telarc CD-80524) This sit-up-and-take-notice recital disc, recorded live at Tanglewood's Seiji Ozawa Hall, makes plain why there's such a buzz about the 18-year-old pianist named Lang Lang. He has built much of his reputation on large-scale, virtuoso repertoire, and Rachmaninoff's Sonata No. 2 certainly gives him plenty of opportunity to show that side of his talent. But the opening Haydn sonata has even more to say about Lang Lang's ability and continued promise.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | August 6, 1995
Richard Strauss, "Salome," performed by Christoph Von Dohnanyi conducting the Vienna Philharmonic; Catherine Malfitano (Salome), Bryn Terfel (Jochanaan), Herod (Kenneth Riegel), Herodias (Hanna Schwarz), Narraboth (Kim Begley), London 444 178-2. Strauss, "Salome," performed by Seiji Ozawa conducting the Dresden State Orchestra; Jessye Norman (Salome), James Morris (Jochanaan), Herod (Walter Raffeiner), Herodias (Kerstin Witt), Narraboth (Richard Leech), Philips 432 153-2.These competing versions of "Salome" each have something to sell: Philips has Jessye Norman in the title role; London has Christoph Von Dohnanyi conducting.
NEWS
October 19, 2002
Grace Hamblin, 94, the trusted private secretary to Winston Churchill and his wife, Clementine, died Tuesday at her home in Westerham, southern England. Nicknamed "Hambone" by the Churchill children, Miss Hamblin began working for Mr. Churchill and his wife part time at Chartwell Manor in 1932. She later became a full-time employee whose tasks included typing manuscripts for Mr. Churchill. When Churchill became prime minister in 1940, Miss Hamblin moved to London and took on the additional role of secretary to his wife, accompanying her on several trips abroad, including North Africa.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 1999
The great Artur Rubinstein once called his student Dubravka Tomsic "a perfect and marvelous pianist." Since the Slovenian pianist returned to the United States in 1989 after a three-decade absence spent concertizing in Europe, Australia and Russia, American audiences have enthusiastically seconded Rubinstein's opinion of her. Tomsic's stellar 1994 debut performances of Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto with Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony led...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has appointed Markus Stenz as principal guest conductor for a three-year term commencing with the 2015-2016 season. The German conductor, who is principal conductor of the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, made a sensational BSO debut in 2012 . In a statement released Wednesday, Stenz said that his "first encounter [with the BSO] in October 2012 is unforgettable to me. I loved the musicians' sophisticated and joyous approach to music making and look forward to experiencing a wide variety of repertoire with the orchestra.
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