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By Fred Powledge | December 19, 1994
WE CALLED ALL of them "segs" back then, of course, Orval Faubus and all the rest of them, because in the South in the 1950s and '60s things were a bit more black or white, a bit more urgent. It wasn't until later that we started separating the bad actors in the civil rights drama into degrees of segregationists -- becoming discriminating about the discriminators, you might say.Orval Faubus, who died last Wednesday at the age of 84, had his moment of fame in 1957, when, as governor of Arkansas, he forced the use of federal troops to desegregate Little Rock Arkansas' Central High School.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
As Columbia prepared to celebrate its first birthday in June 1968, a huge challenge to its pioneering spirit loomed. On the heels of devastating riots in Baltimore following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. just two months earlier, word came that segregationist George Wallace would hold a presidential campaign rally at Merriweather Post Pavilion , in the heart of the new city's sparse downtown. The events leading up to the widely reported story of blacks and whites uniting in opposition to Wallace's visit will comprise the third class in a four-night mini-course on Columbia at the Columbia Archives starting Oct. 4. The rally had been hastily rescheduled at the closest available venue after being rejected by Baltimore police, who feared that city's wounds were so fresh that they couldn't guarantee public safety if Alabama's former governor appeared at the Civic Center.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, a one-time Democratic segregationist who helped fuel the rise of the modern conservative Republican Party in the South, died last night, his family announced. He was 100 and had been the longest-serving senator in history. Mr. Thurmond, whose physical and political endurance were legendary - he holds the record for solo Senate filibustering - retired on Jan. 5 after more than 48 years in office. Last night in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers working feverishly on proposed Medicare expansion stopped their work for a moment of silence in Mr. Thurmond's honor.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Greg Garland and Jennifer Skalka and Greg Garland,Sun reporters | August 24, 2007
Arthur Bremer, who shot and paralyzed Democratic presidential candidate George C. Wallace during a Laurel campaign event in 1972, will be released from a Maryland prison before year's end, state officials said. Bremer, a loner from Milwaukee who attempted to find fame by targeting the then-Alabama governor and one-time segregationist, has served 35 years of a 53-year sentence. He is expected to win early freedom from the Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown as a result of "good conduct credits" earned by being a prison education aide, among other responsibilities.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2003
COLUMBIA, S.C. - The daughter of a one-time segregationist senator - born to his 16-year-old African-American maid when he was 22 - claimed her place among his children and in the nation's troubled history of race yesterday. Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 78, said she decided to speak about being the daughter of Sen. Strom Thurmond, who died this year at age 100, not out of bitterness but to help her children understand their past. "In fact, there is a great sense of peace that has come over me in the past year," she said at a news conference.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - First, let's establish what the Trent Lott imbroglio is not. This is not just another case of liberals attempting to smear a good conservative as a racist just because he happens to oppose any of the left's pet positions on racial preferences or immigration. Nor is this a case of taking a trifling comment out of context and inflating it into something totally different, as liberals have done thousands of times. No, what makes this case so galling is that it places the race-baiters, the wielders of the ready smear and the professional offense-takers in the right for once.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Several readers have e-mailed requests for me to please write something about what a boneheaded statement Senate Republican leader Trent Lott made during his tribute to South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond on Dec. 5. I am honored that some people, in their quest for an alternative to the babble-on gasbags of conservative talk radio and cable TV, would turn to a cut-up like me to be their hatchet man. Still, liberals should be reluctant in...
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Greg Garland and Jennifer Skalka and Greg Garland,Sun reporters | August 24, 2007
Arthur Bremer, who shot and paralyzed Democratic presidential candidate George C. Wallace during a Laurel campaign event in 1972, will be released from a Maryland prison before year's end, state officials said. Bremer, a loner from Milwaukee who attempted to find fame by targeting the then-Alabama governor and one-time segregationist, has served 35 years of a 53-year sentence. He is expected to win early freedom from the Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown as a result of "good conduct credits" earned by being a prison education aide, among other responsibilities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 2003
Lester Maddox, the Atlanta restaurant owner and archsegregationist who adopted the ax handle as his symbol of defiance in a successful bid for the Georgia governorship in 1966, died yesterday. He was 87. Mr. Maddox first came to national attention in 1964, after he violated the newly signed federal Civil Rights Act by refusing to serve three black Georgia Tech students at his Pickrick Restaurant, noted for its fried chicken. Some of his customers were sympathetic to his cause and armed themselves with ax handles to convey to blacks that they would not be served.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
As Columbia prepared to celebrate its first birthday in June 1968, a huge challenge to its pioneering spirit loomed. On the heels of devastating riots in Baltimore following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. just two months earlier, word came that segregationist George Wallace would hold a presidential campaign rally at Merriweather Post Pavilion , in the heart of the new city's sparse downtown. The events leading up to the widely reported story of blacks and whites uniting in opposition to Wallace's visit will comprise the third class in a four-night mini-course on Columbia at the Columbia Archives starting Oct. 4. The rally had been hastily rescheduled at the closest available venue after being rejected by Baltimore police, who feared that city's wounds were so fresh that they couldn't guarantee public safety if Alabama's former governor appeared at the Civic Center.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2003
COLUMBIA, S.C. - The daughter of a one-time segregationist senator - born to his 16-year-old African-American maid when he was 22 - claimed her place among his children and in the nation's troubled history of race yesterday. Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 78, said she decided to speak about being the daughter of Sen. Strom Thurmond, who died this year at age 100, not out of bitterness but to help her children understand their past. "In fact, there is a great sense of peace that has come over me in the past year," she said at a news conference.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, a one-time Democratic segregationist who helped fuel the rise of the modern conservative Republican Party in the South, died last night, his family announced. He was 100 and had been the longest-serving senator in history. Mr. Thurmond, whose physical and political endurance were legendary - he holds the record for solo Senate filibustering - retired on Jan. 5 after more than 48 years in office. Last night in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers working feverishly on proposed Medicare expansion stopped their work for a moment of silence in Mr. Thurmond's honor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 2003
Lester Maddox, the Atlanta restaurant owner and archsegregationist who adopted the ax handle as his symbol of defiance in a successful bid for the Georgia governorship in 1966, died yesterday. He was 87. Mr. Maddox first came to national attention in 1964, after he violated the newly signed federal Civil Rights Act by refusing to serve three black Georgia Tech students at his Pickrick Restaurant, noted for its fried chicken. Some of his customers were sympathetic to his cause and armed themselves with ax handles to convey to blacks that they would not be served.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - First, let's establish what the Trent Lott imbroglio is not. This is not just another case of liberals attempting to smear a good conservative as a racist just because he happens to oppose any of the left's pet positions on racial preferences or immigration. Nor is this a case of taking a trifling comment out of context and inflating it into something totally different, as liberals have done thousands of times. No, what makes this case so galling is that it places the race-baiters, the wielders of the ready smear and the professional offense-takers in the right for once.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Several readers have e-mailed requests for me to please write something about what a boneheaded statement Senate Republican leader Trent Lott made during his tribute to South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond on Dec. 5. I am honored that some people, in their quest for an alternative to the babble-on gasbags of conservative talk radio and cable TV, would turn to a cut-up like me to be their hatchet man. Still, liberals should be reluctant in...
NEWS
By Fred Powledge | December 19, 1994
WE CALLED ALL of them "segs" back then, of course, Orval Faubus and all the rest of them, because in the South in the 1950s and '60s things were a bit more black or white, a bit more urgent. It wasn't until later that we started separating the bad actors in the civil rights drama into degrees of segregationists -- becoming discriminating about the discriminators, you might say.Orval Faubus, who died last Wednesday at the age of 84, had his moment of fame in 1957, when, as governor of Arkansas, he forced the use of federal troops to desegregate Little Rock Arkansas' Central High School.
NEWS
October 19, 1993
* Russell C. Davis, a former mayor of Jackson, Miss., died Saturday at age 71 at his home. Services were set for today in Mississippi. He had suffered from cancer. The Rockville, Md., native served as mayor of Jackson from 1969 to 1977, succeeding five-term segregationist Mayor Allen Thompson. He was an early advocate of moving from the mayor-commission form of government, controlled by a mayor and two commissioners, to the mayor-council form, adopted in 1985. Under the change, Jackson now has a majority-black city council.
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