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By Luke Broadwater | June 16, 2011
At the mayoral candidates forum last night at Coppin State, political hopefuls discussed serious topics, such as taxes and the economy.  But early in the night, one candidate made a series of seemingly bizarre statements. Baltimore City Circuit Court clerk Frank Conaway, the perennial mayoral candidate, apparently endorsed cronyism, race-baiting and Jim Crow laws all within the span of a few minutes.  Read City Hall reporter Julie Scharper's article in The Sun here .  "You can be black on the outside and white on the inside," [Conaway]
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Ollie M.J. Ray, whose career teaching in city public schools spanned nearly four decades, died Tuesday of heart failure at Northwest Hospital. She was 82. "They say teachers are born, and Ollie had not only the native ability to be a teacher but also the desire," said Hayyte Jackson, who was a college friend and later a colleague in Baltimore public schools. "She had a great love for children and young people, and wanted to see them receive their appropriate secular and Christian education," said Mrs. Jackson, who retired in 1993 from Windsor Hills Elementary School, where she had been principal.
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By Ian Duncan and Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | March 16, 2013
A Towson University student made national news at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) Friday when he suggested segregating black Republicans from the rest of the party. A Black Republican from Alabama, K Carl Smith, hosted a panel called "Trump the Race Card: Are You Sick and Tired of Being Called a Racist and You Know You're Not One?" Calling himself a "Frederick Douglass Republican," Smith's panel was meant to address the Republican Party's struggles to attract black and minority voters.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
Cornell Brooks is inheriting the leadership of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People at a time when the nation's oldest civil rights organization is experiencing a resurgence of influence and membership in its long struggle for equal rights. Mr. Brooks, whose appointment as NAACP chief was announced Saturday, is a lawyer, minister and long-time civil rights activist who is well equipped to carry forward the new initiatives begun in 2008 by his predecessor, Benjamin Jealous.
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Erica L. Green | April 19, 2012
The notion that poor students are less likely to have access to high-quality educational options isn't new, but a report released today by the Brookings Institution sheds light on a factor that hasn't yet been highlighted as a driver of the achievement gap. The report examined test scores and housing costs in 100 of the largest metropolitan regions in the nation, including the Baltimore-Towson area, and found that  stringent zoning...
EXPLORE
November 23, 2011
The news of giving the privileged allotted time for women to swim is going back to the time when men were allowed to have their special clubs and others could have their special, exclusive groups. I believe that was called segregation. However, men had to relinquish that privilege. When you travel to an Islamic country a woman is required to cover her head. We have to adopt to their culture and laws. I believe the same should be applied in this case. If an Islamic woman feels uncomfortable swimming at the regular times with other people, she has three choices.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
James Dixon joined the Baltimore Police Department in 1954 as a black officer in an era of widespread racial prejudice. Police posts were segregated and blacks were not allowed in patrol cars On Tuesday, a quarter-century after he retired as a sergeant, Dixon returned to the department for a ceremony to honor his service and thank him for his role in helping the department through a time of social change. Dixon, 77, was given a BPD hat and coffee mug. "I think today was really good for him because I don't think he realized how far the Police Department has come," said Derrick Dixon, James' son. "So for him to come out here and see a lot of Afro-American officers and commissioners, I think it blew his mind.
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | September 18, 1993
Starting with Third World Orientation and through to the Gay Alumni Association, college seems to be place that people separate themselves. And the colleges are going along.As I visit colleges with my son, who's a high school senior, one of the things that strikes me most is segregation -- admittedly voluntary segregation -- in living arrangements. Most schools these days seem to have "special interest houses" of various kinds: Veggie House, Substance-Free House, houses where students speak French.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Carmelia Hicks' favorite grade-school teacher, Julia T. Smith, was a kindly human being, but she kept a thick paddle in her desk drawer and was never afraid to use it. The way Hicks remembers it, Miss Smith had plenty of backup. "If you acted up, she sent you to the principal's office. Miss [Alice] Battle, the principal, had an even thicker paddle. Then they'd call your parents, and when you got home, you'd get another beating," Hicks says of the mid-1960s, when she was a student at the Lula G. Scott Elementary School in Shady Side.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Alumni and students from Maryland's four historically black universities took their long-held view that the state perpetuates racial segregation to court Tuesday, arguing that their institutions are underfunded. The federal lawsuit calls on the state to pay for improvements at the four schools - Morgan State, Coppin State, Bowie State and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore - that would make them more competitive with traditionally white peers. It also calls for the dismantling of programs at traditionally white schools that "unnecessarily" duplicate programs at the historically black universities.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
At 16, Dorant Wells has experienced the complexities of what Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark school desegregation ruling, has wrought: He attended a middle school full of students of different colors and nationalities, but one where he sometimes felt there were lower expectations for black students. Now at his nearly all African-American high school, Milford Mill Academy in Baltimore County, he sees value in the special character of the school, while acknowledging he may be less prepared to enter a diverse world.
NEWS
By Benjamin Todd Jealous | April 12, 2014
It is a state that Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass both ran away from, a state that enslaved half its black population at the time of the Civil War. It is a state that would have seceded from the Union in 1861 if not for Abraham Lincoln's last-minute decision to impose martial law and arrest 12 members of the General Assembly to prevent them from taking a vote. Maryland is a Southern state, as it always has been. But you could forgive a young person today for believing that the Mason-Dixon Line begins just a little farther down Interstate 95. Indeed, modern Maryland has seen the most successful run of civil rights legislation of any state in recent history.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Thanks for pointing out that isolating convicts alone for protracted periods amounts to the same thing as torture ( "Isolated confinement," March 31). During the last year I have visited inmates at Maryland's North Branch Corrections Institution. Of the 1,300 men incarcerated there, almost half have been in "segregation" since last summer. I believe that every human being has a soul, even prisoners who have committed violent crimes. I also believe that by nourishing and stimulating the human soul, there is a possibility for repentance and spiritual growth.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
After a federal judge found that Maryland's historically black colleges face unfair and unconstitutional competition from the state's predominantly white universities, the parties headed into negotiations this month to work it out. But even with the far-reaching court decision, some worried the rights of black institutions wouldn't be protected and tried to put the judge's ruling on the books as state law. "I'm normally not a Doubting Thomas,"...
NEWS
By Michael Corbin | December 30, 2013
"Why do no white kids go to school here?" A 14-year-old ninth-grader asked me this question earlier this semester about the school she attends and where I teach. Smart and genuinely curious, she asked the question without any of that world-weary irony and moral casuistry that often attends questions from teenagers and, more generally, questions about school segregation in present day America. More, her question was not shaded with the language of inequality or achievement gaps or school reforms or global competitiveness.
NEWS
By ANNETTE FUENTES | June 2, 2006
At this year's middle school and high school graduations, you may notice something: Our public schools are getting more segregated. Educator and author Jonathan Kozol writes about the troubling trend in his recent book, Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. He notes that in Chicago, by the 2000-2001 academic year, 87 percent of public school enrollment was black or Hispanic; less than 10 percent of children in the schools were white. In Philadelphia and Cleveland, 78 percent was black or Hispanic.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 6, 1991
Boston -- SAT scores are falling again. The ''education president'' is out exhorting parents to blame themselves, not Washington. There are calls for school choice and vouchers and teacher testing. And in the cities there is more than a hint of desperation, and the crisp cry to try something -- anything -- new, as if educational reform were a sharpened Eberhard No.2.One of the ''new'' ideas that will not come to the beleaguered city of Detroit this month is the all-male school. This last-ditch attempt to Save the Boys with an Afro-centric curriculum, male teachers, longer hours and higher academic standards was stopped in court.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Joseph G. "Bodie" Finnerty Jr., a highly regarded trial lawyer who headed DLA Piper's litigation department and oversaw expansion of the firm to Philadelphia and New York City, died Thursday of Alzheimer's disease at Copper Ridge assisted-living facility in Sykesville. The former longtime Guilford resident was 76. "Joe was an outstanding lawyer and was the firm's heavy lifter and go-to guy. It is no wonder that he became its top litigator," said J. Joseph Curran Jr., former Maryland attorney general.
NEWS
May 26, 2013
Coppin State University is a mess ("Tough love for Coppin," May 19)? The "mess" that Coppin confronts stems mainly from continuing vestiges of de jure segregation that it and the three other Maryland historically black colleges and universities still face. Add neglect to the mix. The University System of Maryland, the facilitator of the Special Committee Report examining Coppin, is part of a system that remains responsible for these vestiges. Nowhere will you find the term "disparities" or the phrase "comparable and competitive disparities" (compared with Maryland's traditionally white institutions)
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