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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 1996
NEW YORK -- Insistent that the three men accused of killing a police officer last week should face the death penalty, Gov. George E. Pataki took the case away yesterday from the Bronx district attorney who refused to quickly declare whether he would seek death sentences.The move by Mr. Pataki brought the promise of a legal challenge from the rejected prosecutor, Robert T. Johnson."We cannot have different standards and different laws in different parts of this state," Mr. Pataki said. "We cannot have the death penalty in New York state, except for the Bronx."
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Julie Scharper and Brent Jones and Julie Scharper,Sun Reporters | August 6, 2008
Federal prosecutors are seeking the death penalty for a 23-year-old man accused of orchestrating from prison the murder-for-hire of a Baltimore County man who had witnessed a killing in the city, according to a notice filed in U.S. District Court yesterday. A superseding indictment alleges that Albert Byers Jr., of Baltimore, paid at least $2,500 to co-defendants to fatally shoot Carl Stanley Lackl in July 2007 outside his Rosedale home. Authorities have said Lackl had witnessed Byers shoot a man in an East Baltimore alley a year earlier.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | July 15, 2006
Federal prosecutors in Maryland said yesterday that they will seek the death penalty against a Baltimore man accused of killing four people, but not against two brothers charged with employing him as part of a violent West Baltimore drug organization. The announcement focused on Eric Hall, 35, of Baltimore, who was indicted last year and charged in two killings in Baltimore. Papers filed in U.S. District Court now link Hall to two additional deaths. "When considering the death penalty, we don't just look at the facts and circumstances alleged in the indictment, but the defendant's entire life history," Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said yesterday.
NEWS
November 30, 2007
Today, Maryland is in a unique position to get out of the business of executing prisoners. A de facto moratorium exists here, stemming from an appeals court decision that invalidated the state's protocols on administering the death penalty. And even if the irregularities in the protocols were fixed, it's unlikely any of the five men on death row would be executed, because Gov. Martin O'Malley adamantly opposes the death penalty. Even Scott D. Shellenberger, state's attorney for Baltimore County - which leads the state in death penalty cases - has pledged to revise his office's practice of seeking capital punishment in all eligible cases.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 20, 1991
Prosecutors will seek the death penalty for Steven Gregory Anderson,who has been charged with the abduction, rape and murder of a Crofton woman three months after he was released from prison.State's Attorney Frank Weathersbee said Wednesday he'd seek to send Anderson tothe gas chamber when trial commences March 5. Anderson is accused ofstrangling Gwyn Dixon Criswell last September."The severity of the crime and the innocence of the victim" loomed large in the decision to seek the death penalty, said Cynthia Ferris, the assistant state's attorney who will prosecute the case.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
A former Navy seaman's lawyers have charged in pretrial motions that State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee is seeking the death penalty against their client because of election-year pressures.Darris Ware, 23, of no fixed address, has been charged with two counts of first-degree murder in the Dec. 30, 1993, slayings of his fiancee, Betina Gentry, 18, and her neighbor, Cynthia Vega-Allen, 22. They were found shot to death in Ms. Gentry's Severn home.Prosecutors told Mr. Ware on March 22 that they would seek the death penalty.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 16, 2003
The state Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee has scheduled a hearing at 1 p.m. Thursday on two bills dealing with Maryland's death penalty, introduced by Sen. Nancy Jacobs, a Republican representing portions of Harford and Cecil counties. Senate Bill 172 is named for Dawn Marie Garvin, a 1987 murder victim. The legislation would require that if a perpetrator commits a capital crime, the state would be required to seek the death penalty. "If you are going to have a death penalty law on the books, it should enforced," Jacobs said.
NEWS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | June 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Attorney General Janet Reno offered yesterday to help the small town of Jasper, Texas, with its prosecution of three white men in the hate-crime killing of a disabled black man in order to avoid letting "dollars become part of the equation of justice."Prosecutors in the rural logging town of about 8,000 people are struggling with the costs of trying not only that case but an earlier murder case as well.The community must find the resources for prosecutions that could seek the death penalty in the highly publicized slaying of James Byrd Jr., who was chained and dragged to his death behind a pickup truck in the early hours of June 7, and in the bludgeoning death of a local builder May 31.Jasper District Attorney James Gray is awaiting final results of laboratory tests before deciding whether to seek the death penalty in the Byrd case.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,sun reporter | October 7, 2006
Anne Arundel County prosecutors will seek the death penalty for two prisoners charged in the stabbing death of a correctional officer inside the Maryland House of Correction in July, the county state's attorney announced yesterday. The decision was made after consulting with prosecutors, Maryland State Police investigators and the family of David McGuinn, the 42-year-old correctional officer who was killed the night of July 25. "The family is very supportive of the death penalty in this case," said State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 4, 2002
Howard County prosecutors have decided not to seek the death penalty against Tavon Donya Sands, the 20-year-old man charged with killing an information technology student from Columbia during a botched robbery in Oakland Mills. The case met the legal criteria for seeking the death penalty because of the armed robbery, but prosecutors opted against it after reviewing the case and talking with the mother of victim DeShawn Anthony Wallace, said Howard State's Attorney Marna L. McLendon. Prosecutors will instead seek life without the possibility of parole if Sands is convicted, she said.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 11, 2006
Prosecutors should automatically seek the death penalty against inmates serving life terms who stand accused of killing corrections officers. That doesn't even need debating, does it? Well, there should probably be no debate. But discussing it with the victims' family members should be standard policy, and that's what Anne Arundel County prosecutors did in the case of corrections officer David McGuinn. But what happens if the family members of those victims don't want the death penalty?
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | September 3, 2006
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy has been consistent about what she says it takes for her to seek a criminal's death, something she has done just twice in her 11 years on the job. "It should be a case that is just so shocking to the conscience that it cries out for the death penalty," she said four years ago. Only a week ago, she reiterated that same point: "It should be reserved for those individuals who commit the most heinous crimes."...
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | July 15, 2006
Federal prosecutors in Maryland said yesterday that they will seek the death penalty against a Baltimore man accused of killing four people, but not against two brothers charged with employing him as part of a violent West Baltimore drug organization. The announcement focused on Eric Hall, 35, of Baltimore, who was indicted last year and charged in two killings in Baltimore. Papers filed in U.S. District Court now link Hall to two additional deaths. "When considering the death penalty, we don't just look at the facts and circumstances alleged in the indictment, but the defendant's entire life history," Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said yesterday.
NEWS
June 12, 2005
THE FATE of Wesley Eugene Baker, a death row inmate, is now in the hands of Maryland's highest court. We hope that the Court of Appeals justices won't tolerate a penalty that has been shown to be seriously flawed - in both racial and geographic terms - in its application around the state. At the least, they should allow a lower court to consider whether those inconsistencies tainted Mr. Baker's case. Mr. Baker, a black man who is now 47, was convicted of killing a 49-year-old white woman, Jane Tyson, in a shopping mall parking lot and was sentenced to death in 1992.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
Four days after a Baltimore County judge signed a death warrant for convicted murderer Vernon L. Evans Jr., the man's lawyers asked the judge yesterday to postpone the execution and overturn a sentence that they contend was based on a "racially discriminatory" application of the death penalty by Baltimore County prosecutors. The legal pursuit launches Evans' attorneys into the company of a growing number of advocates for death-row inmates who have based appeals of their sentences on a University of Maryland study conducted by Professor Raymond Paternoster that found geographic and racial disparities in the application of the death penalty.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
In a case being closely watched by both sides in the death penalty debate, the Maryland attorney general is asking the state's highest court to erase an Anne Arundel County ruling that would force prosecutors to say whether they intend to seek the death penalty when they bring an indictment. The issue, being argued before the Maryland Court of Appeals today, involves the case of Michael D. Henry, who is to go on trial in January in the stabbing death of a fellow inmate. Prosecutors warn that Anne Arundel County judges effectively rewrote the state's death-penalty legal procedures in a way that could force them to decide early on -- often more than a year before they otherwise might -- whether to seek the death penalty.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
Howard County State's Attorney William R. Hymes said yesterday that he has not decided whether to seek the death penalty against one of the men charged in the carjacking death of a Savage woman in September."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 11, 2006
Prosecutors should automatically seek the death penalty against inmates serving life terms who stand accused of killing corrections officers. That doesn't even need debating, does it? Well, there should probably be no debate. But discussing it with the victims' family members should be standard policy, and that's what Anne Arundel County prosecutors did in the case of corrections officer David McGuinn. But what happens if the family members of those victims don't want the death penalty?
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
A Baltimore man was found guilty yesterday of kidnapping and killing his girlfriend's 8-year-old daughter, paving the way for prosecutors to pursue the death penalty at a sentencing hearing this fall. Jamaal K. Abeokuto stood motionless and with no expression as a Baltimore County judge rendered the verdict. Earlier yesterday, the victim's mother fled from the courtroom in tears after hearing a lawyer describe her daughter's lethal wounds. Marciana Ringo's throat had been slashed. The Northwood Elementary School pupil's body was found in a wooded area of Harford County.
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