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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2010
Question: I'm starting vegetable seeds indoors and confused about fluorescent light bulbs. I have regular cool white 40-watt fluorescent bulbs and also a "plant/aquarium" 40-watt tube that gives off a purple glow. Does it matter? Answer: Most important is the age of the light bulb. As fluorescent bulbs age, their light emission diminishes. The newer the bulb, the brighter the light. Bulbs sold specifically for seedlings are marginally better but probably not worth the expense.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
My dogwood had leaf spots last summer. Now my neighbors say it's dead and I should cut it down. Should I? Your neighbors may think it had Discula anthracnose, a fungal disease that slowly killed many dogwoods - particularly stressed ones - in full sun and poor soil. However, because of the genetic diversity of the dogwood, this disease is no longer the rampant threat it once was. Resistant dogwoods survived. Maryland weather fluctuates yearly, and wet conditions last year led to outbreaks of other fungal leaf spot diseases.
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FEATURES
March 9, 1997
Can I grow tomato seedlings in a sunny window and get good results?A window with an unobstructed Southern exposure may give you sufficient light. However, vegetable and flower transplants grown windowsills are subject to drafts and temperature extremes. Often the result is a spindly plant.It's best to grow transplants under 4-foot-long "shop lights," fitted with cool, white fluorescent light tubes. Run the lights 14-16 hours each day, keep the tops of your seedlings only 1-2 inches from the light tubes and don't overwater.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
A dozen inmates at the Patuxent Institution in Jessup have been working for months to help bring back the American chestnut tree, and in the process give themselves a bit of a comeback as well. This week inmates and administrators at the prison handed over 603 chestnut seedlings, grown in a greenhouse on the institute grounds, that they have raised from chestnuts to 12-inch sprouts. The seedlings were accepted by representatives from the American Chestnut Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to restoring the tree species.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 5, 2000
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources will give away spruce seedlings today, and children across Maryland will plant them and other tree species for the state observance of Arbor Day. The first Arbor Day was celebrated April 10, 1872, in Nebraska, where newspaper publisher J. Sterling Morton encouraged the public to plant trees to beautify and enrich the largely treeless state. Morton offered prizes for those who planted the most, and more than a million trees were put into the ground that day. Though National Arbor Day is celebrated the last Friday in April, each state celebrates its day based on climate -- with Maryland's observance traditionally the first Wednesday in April.
NEWS
April 11, 1991
The Linde Division of Union Carbide Corp. launched "Rooting for America -- The Linde Community Tree-Planting Program," a nationwide environmental program, last year.This year, the Anne Arundel County offices of the New Jersey-based division are working to get North County communities involved in planting tree seedlings in what it calls special-care grounds.The young trees are tended in the areas for two or three years, until they are strong enough for transplanting.The offices are making a $2,500 cash donation to the Anne Arundel Beautification Programto purchase the trees.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | August 5, 1991
Rich Pollock, who as a member of the Coalition to Preserve Black Marsh has frequently criticized state plans for the 1,310-acre tract of woods, beach and marshland in eastern Baltimore County, joined forces with the state back in April to plant trees on Black Marsh property.Pollock was one of about a dozen volunteers who came out on a Saturday to help plant some 300 ash, oak and dogwood seedlings on a three-fourths-acre section of state-owned land at Black Marsh.It was all part of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's "Tree-mendous" program.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
It wasn't the typical scene on the grounds of a state prison. Inmates in matching blue outfits and hats, alongside the governor, bent over in a muddy field to plant hundreds of seedlings behind the barbed wire-lined fencing of a maximum-security prison. But with the help of those couple of dozen inmates - and the seedlings - Howard County will be turning a little greener.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | July 12, 1991
Last week's rains came too late for the 3,000 seedlings planted thisyear in the Route 100-Route 10 median strip. About 85 percent have died, the victims of the summer drought.But the contractor who planted the trees has agreed to plant new ones for no additional charge,state officials said."There was nothing we could do about it. The draught has absolutely devastated many of our plantings from this year. I've started to remove some of the tubes from the dead ones in the median strip. I'd say somewhere around 15 percent of those trees have survived," said Walter Orlinsky, director of the state sponsored Tree-Mendous Maryland program.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
Laughing and joking in spite of a steady drizzle, members of the St. Mary's High School Environmental Club gathered around a narrow wooden table and hungrily devoured the pizza and cookies laid out before them. After an hour of planting 100 foot-tall red oak seedlings, the students were famished but satisfied. "I understand that the watershed has a problem and even though we've only planted a hundred trees, we're helping the environment," said Stephanie Channing, 15. Channing and the other students were the first wave of volunteers for the Annapolis Environmental Commission's "tree grow out" at Back Creek Nature Park.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Is it too late to transplant crape myrtle or birch? In general, you can transplant until the ground freezes. Go ahead and transplant the crape myrtle. The birch, however, is on a short list of trees that are exceptions to the rule. It should be transplanted in the spring. Suddenly I have a new weed everywhere in my beds and lawn. It has green clusters of flowers on stems coming out of the joints. Leaves have jagged edges. Seems to be an annual, and I pull it repeatedly, but how did it get here?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
The gift that a notorious gangster made to Union Memorial Hospital 72 years ago is still giving. The weeping cherry, known to all in the hospital community as the Capone tree, is showing its age but remains resplendent and fertile with its glorious spring blossoms, abundant seedlings and rich wood. The tree donated by Al Capone lost a hefty limb in the 2010 snow storms. The toppled branch left a gaping hole halfway up the trunk and raised concerns for the longstanding landmark on East 33rd Street.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2010
Question: I'm starting vegetable seeds indoors and confused about fluorescent light bulbs. I have regular cool white 40-watt fluorescent bulbs and also a "plant/aquarium" 40-watt tube that gives off a purple glow. Does it matter? Answer: Most important is the age of the light bulb. As fluorescent bulbs age, their light emission diminishes. The newer the bulb, the brighter the light. Bulbs sold specifically for seedlings are marginally better but probably not worth the expense.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | January 28, 2010
S eeds or seedlings? Those eager to join the vegetable gardening revolution this season have a decision to make. Are you going to grow your vegetables from seed? Or will you purchase seedlings from your local garden center or a farmers' market? If you are going to grow your own seedlings, it is just about time to get started. The advantages include savings, pride and choice. You can grow exactly what you want, in the numbers you want and you don't have to count on somebody else's idea of variety.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | April 11, 2009
In the spring, a young girl's fancy turns to - well, helping preserve the environment. That was the case for 9-year-old Bethany Ingram, anyway, as she took a break Friday from her task of digging a hole in a bit of soggy turf in Edgeley Grove Park in Fallston. The fourth-grader, nature enthusiast and member of Girl Scout Troop 883 in Bel Air was getting ready to plant the 2-foot seedling of a red maple tree, one of about 1,000 trees put in the ground by volunteers on an unexpectedly sunny morning as part of Harford County's seventh annual Arbor Day Celebration and Conservation Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ELLEN NIBALI AND JOHN TRAUNFELD | February 19, 2009
What kind of light bulb is best for starting seedlings indoors? We recommend using a fluorescent, shop light-type unit containing two standard 40-watt fluorescent tubes or one cool white and one warm white tube. This provides adequate light for growing transplants and is more economical than special lighting. Suspend the unit so the lights are 1 to 2 inches above the tops of the seedling plants and raise the lights as the plants grow. Adding some natural light also improves results. For more detail, call us or go online to read our publications on starting and transplanting vegetable seedlings.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | April 11, 2009
In the spring, a young girl's fancy turns to - well, helping preserve the environment. That was the case for 9-year-old Bethany Ingram, anyway, as she took a break Friday from her task of digging a hole in a bit of soggy turf in Edgeley Grove Park in Fallston. The fourth-grader, nature enthusiast and member of Girl Scout Troop 883 in Bel Air was getting ready to plant the 2-foot seedling of a red maple tree, one of about 1,000 trees put in the ground by volunteers on an unexpectedly sunny morning as part of Harford County's seventh annual Arbor Day Celebration and Conservation Project.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
It wasn't the typical scene on the grounds of a state prison. Inmates in matching blue outfits and hats, alongside the governor, bent over in a muddy field to plant hundreds of seedlings behind the barbed wire-lined fencing of a maximum-security prison. But with the help of those couple of dozen inmates - and the seedlings - Howard County will be turning a little greener.
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