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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 2002
SEDONA, Ariz. - It's hard to know which is evaporating more quickly in this quirky New Age town, the raindrops that occasionally spatter the famous red rocks or the tourists who usually fill downtown cash registers. One thing is certain: They are connected in a way few thought possible before this summer. The U.S. Forest Service is set to reopen thousands of back-country acres to lovers of the outdoors today after record drought and the fear of huge fires prompted their being placed off-limits more than a month ago. It was the first time the federal agency had closed Coconino National Forest, south of the Grand Canyon.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Toni L. Killefer, a former preschool teacher who mentored cancer patients and participated in breast cancer research, died Monday of metastatic breast cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 49. "I took care of Toni for a number of years, and she had her eyes wide open on this. She always knew what she was up against and she was very straightforward," said Dr. John H. Fetting III, a Johns Hopkins Hospital oncologist. "All she wanted to be was a mom and look out for her children with as little fuss about her illness, and just be able to manage.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 22, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Would-be kingmaker Larry King, whose talk show ushered billionaire Ross Perot onto and then abruptly off the presidential platform, tonight steps away from politics for his third show biz celebrity special."
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 6, 2012
Sedona, Ariz., is one of Chandler Tschand's favorite places in the world. He's been there dozens of times, so it's no coincidence that he and his wife,  Asha (the official owner), named their year-old Woodstock restaurant Sedona Grill. Nor is it a coincidence that Southwestern fare is the culinary theme here. This cuisine favors a kinder, gentler approach than the spicier Tex-Mex (and Mexican) styles of Arizona's neighbors. It is generally less heated with well-balanced background flavors.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
A Memorable Place A hard ride into a fascinating town By Robert L. Lamborn SPECIAL TO THE SUN We rode our bicycles up Oak Creek Canyon into Sedona. In the high desert country of Arizona, 4,500 feet above sea level, the little town is nestled between red-rock walls, spires and buttes, bluffs and chimneys in a magnificent box canyon. The setting is so dramatic it has been the site of many classic Western films. It's also home to a vibrant arts colony. Our schedule for the day -- we were on a 3,500-mile bicycle tour from Los Angeles to Boston -- called for us to ride more than 50 miles from Cottonwood to Flagstaff, climbing more than 3,000 feet.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
BETHANY BEACH, Del. -- If Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island deserve their self-proclaimed title as the "quiet resorts," maybe it's because their restaurants have always lived up to that billing -- relatively few and scattered with modest ambitions. Until recently, that is. Slowly but steadily the least hectic of the peninsula's beach towns have started to generate some buzz among the restaurant-going public. Their fine dining compares to the best of their northerly neighbor Rehoboth Beach, while a suprisingly wide diversity of specialty and family-friendly restaurants have popped up, too. Libby Kaufman of Potomac thinks Bethany's Sedona restaurant is as good as any dining spot near her home in Montgomery County and a vast improvement over what little there was in Bethany when she and her husband bought their beachfront condo in 1975.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Toni L. Killefer, a former preschool teacher who mentored cancer patients and participated in breast cancer research, died Monday of metastatic breast cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 49. "I took care of Toni for a number of years, and she had her eyes wide open on this. She always knew what she was up against and she was very straightforward," said Dr. John H. Fetting III, a Johns Hopkins Hospital oncologist. "All she wanted to be was a mom and look out for her children with as little fuss about her illness, and just be able to manage.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 6, 2012
Sedona, Ariz., is one of Chandler Tschand's favorite places in the world. He's been there dozens of times, so it's no coincidence that he and his wife,  Asha (the official owner), named their year-old Woodstock restaurant Sedona Grill. Nor is it a coincidence that Southwestern fare is the culinary theme here. This cuisine favors a kinder, gentler approach than the spicier Tex-Mex (and Mexican) styles of Arizona's neighbors. It is generally less heated with well-balanced background flavors.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 4, 1997
Matt stared at the water cascading over the smooth, sloping (( rocks and gave me that you-really-blew-it-this-time look parents know too well.It's that look we especially hate to see on vacation, when we've tried so hard to make the kids happy, to convince them -- for a few hours, anyway -- that Mom and Dad can come up with some pretty cool ideas occasionally."
TRAVEL
May 28, 2006
Prickly Mickey While hiking last year in the mountains of Sedona, Ariz., I came across this unique cactus with a familiar shape. It reminded me of a famous mouse created by one of my favorite people: Walt Disney, of course. Kathryn H. Knight Clarksville
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
A Memorable Place A hard ride into a fascinating town By Robert L. Lamborn SPECIAL TO THE SUN We rode our bicycles up Oak Creek Canyon into Sedona. In the high desert country of Arizona, 4,500 feet above sea level, the little town is nestled between red-rock walls, spires and buttes, bluffs and chimneys in a magnificent box canyon. The setting is so dramatic it has been the site of many classic Western films. It's also home to a vibrant arts colony. Our schedule for the day -- we were on a 3,500-mile bicycle tour from Los Angeles to Boston -- called for us to ride more than 50 miles from Cottonwood to Flagstaff, climbing more than 3,000 feet.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 20, 2002
SEDONA, Ariz. - It's hard to know which is evaporating more quickly in this quirky New Age town, the raindrops that occasionally spatter the famous red rocks or the tourists who usually fill downtown cash registers. One thing is certain: They are connected in a way few thought possible before this summer. The U.S. Forest Service is set to reopen thousands of back-country acres to lovers of the outdoors today after record drought and the fear of huge fires prompted their being placed off-limits more than a month ago. It was the first time the federal agency had closed Coconino National Forest, south of the Grand Canyon.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
BETHANY BEACH, Del. -- If Bethany Beach and Fenwick Island deserve their self-proclaimed title as the "quiet resorts," maybe it's because their restaurants have always lived up to that billing -- relatively few and scattered with modest ambitions. Until recently, that is. Slowly but steadily the least hectic of the peninsula's beach towns have started to generate some buzz among the restaurant-going public. Their fine dining compares to the best of their northerly neighbor Rehoboth Beach, while a suprisingly wide diversity of specialty and family-friendly restaurants have popped up, too. Libby Kaufman of Potomac thinks Bethany's Sedona restaurant is as good as any dining spot near her home in Montgomery County and a vast improvement over what little there was in Bethany when she and her husband bought their beachfront condo in 1975.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 4, 1997
Matt stared at the water cascading over the smooth, sloping (( rocks and gave me that you-really-blew-it-this-time look parents know too well.It's that look we especially hate to see on vacation, when we've tried so hard to make the kids happy, to convince them -- for a few hours, anyway -- that Mom and Dad can come up with some pretty cool ideas occasionally."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 22, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Would-be kingmaker Larry King, whose talk show ushered billionaire Ross Perot onto and then abruptly off the presidential platform, tonight steps away from politics for his third show biz celebrity special."
NEWS
October 23, 2005
GLENNA L. KOTCHENREUTHERBECHTOLD, 75, a resident of Sedona, AZ, died October 16, 2005. Born January 13, 1930 in Baltimore, MD, Mrs. Bechtold was a member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Pratt & Clinton, and First Lutheran Church of Gray Manor, Dundalk, MD. Mrs. Bechtold was a member of the Class of June 1948, Patterson Park High School. Mrs. Bechtold was a past Queen of Job's Daughter Bethel #3. Mrs. Bechtold worked for 22 years for Baltimore County Public School System. Mrs. Bechtold is survived by her loving daughter Letha Bechtold and beloved friends Cas Helbing, Edith Kozlowski, Lynn Thompson, Kay Klasmeier, and Maxine Dietrich.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2000
The city manager of an Arizona resort town, who was a finalist the last time the Columbia Association was looking for a president, is in the running for the job again, sources said yesterday. Michael Letcher, city manager of Sedona, Ariz., is one of three finalists to head the Columbia homeowners association for the community of 87,000. Letcher sought the job two years ago but lost out to Deborah O. McCarty, who resigned under pressure in May after 20 months. Names of the two other finalists have not been made public.
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