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By Robert H. Deluty | April 12, 1995
Each Spring, loved ones gatherTo extol and thank God forMiracles past and present;To partake matzot and wine,Salt water and bitter herbs;To recount Israelite servitude,Exodus and redemption; andTo rejoice in the world'sMost precious gifts:Freedom and children.
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NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman | April 15, 2014
Traditional rituals of Passover — the stories, the questions, the food — get a modern spin when Rabbi Geoff Basik presides over Kol HaLev's community seder. The second night observance, held this year on April 15, has become a tradition for the Reconstructionist synagogue congregation. Kol HaLev annually invites members of Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church on North Charles Street, where Jewish community is located, to join the celebration. It is one of the ways Kol HaLev seeks to reach out into the broader community.
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FEATURES
By David Plotnikoff and David Plotnikoff,Knight-Ridder New Service | April 14, 1995
In the virtual world, there are on-line services and then there are on-line services.The Prodigy system is about to launch the first test of wired worship -- with an interfaith Easter service on Sunday and a sixth-night Passover Seder Wednesday night. The on-screen observances, to be held in Prodigy's real-time "chat" area, are aimed at those who either can't or won't get away from the keyboard long enough to attend traditional services.What makes these two cyber-chats different from all others?
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
During the Passover Seder, the youngest child at the table traditionally recites four questions about the rituals of the service. The rest of the year, though, parents often ask the questions. I invited Donna Kane, a consultant on parenting, child development and adolescent issues for Jewish Community Services in Baltimore, to muse about what the Passover questions teach us about communicating with children year-round. Here's what she wrote: "How often do you ask your child a question and hear, 'I don't know' as the response?
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Religion Editor of The Sun | March 28, 1991
If the copies of the New Testament on the big, round Seder tables seemed incongruous, there was an easy explanation: The ritual meal of the Jewish Passover is increasingly something celebrated by Christians and Jews together to recall their shared heritage.At Sunday afternoon's special Seder in the Beth Am Synagogue on Eutaw Place, black Baptist guests brought to members of the Jewish congregation additional reminders of traditions held in common, social as well as religious.For the fourth time, the flocks of Rabbi Ira Schiffer and the Rev. Robert C. Hunt were coming together during the week before Passover.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
For 11-year-old Michael Fedder, the foods served only once a year were nevertheless familiar.He easily described traditional foods for other children who had come to celebrate Passover with their families at Beth Shalom, or house of peace, in Taylorsville."
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2001
A LOCAL congregation is busy preparing for a seder this week. It will be like most Jewish seders, except there is an important difference: It will take place in a Lutheran church. Joy Aker, deacon of New Hope Lutheran Church in Kings Contrivance, started the seder tradition at the parish about 16 years ago. She said the seders were small at first, but have grown in popularity over the years. Aker grew up in a largely Jewish neighborhood on Long Island, N.Y., where she often was invited to seders.
FEATURES
By Faye Levy | March 17, 1991
Passover has always been the holiday I love best. But I enjoyed it more than ever during the years I lived in Israel as a college student. Back in my previous home in Washington, Passover used to be a time for a family get-together and good traditional Ashkenazic food. But in Israel there was the excitement of discovering the holiday specialties of my many Sephardic in-laws. To me their cooking was exotic and intriguing.One memorable Passover I celebrated was at my mother's new home in Jerusalem.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Jacqueline Smelkinson, the hostess, ordered the tent a month ago. Karl Yatovitz, the gefilte fish specialist, came in from Boca Raton, Fla., this week. Lily Friedman, the granddaughter, was helping to set up the tables yesterday. With Passover to begin after sundown tonight, preparations for what might be the city's most renowned seder were well under way. As Jews around the world commemorate the exodus of the ancient Israelites from Egypt and slavery, about 90 guests - family and friends, Jews and non-Jews, arriving from around the country - will gather at the North Baltimore home of Robert and Jacqueline Smelkinson this evening for a celebration that traces its roots back more than 70 years.
NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,Contributing writer | April 19, 1992
For Harford's small Jewish community, the Passover season is an important time to pass on the rituals of their faith to children.LastSunday, Rabbi Kenneth Block of the Harford Jewish Center and teachers from the center's Sunday School performed a mock Seder for about 60children, ranging in age from preschoolers to 16-year-olds.The event included singing and reciting prayers.During the mock Seder, the children and teachers discussed the purpose of Passover, which began Friday.The Seder's purpose was to instruct the children in religion and prepare them for two Seders conducted Friday andSaturday nights in their homes.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | April 2, 2007
When Methodist clergy and congregations around Baltimore have questions about Jesus' Jewish heritage, they can turn to their conference rabbi. The Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church appointed Rabbi Joshua Martin Siegel last year to help put the Jewish roots of the Protestant faith in context through Bible study and demonstration. The Jewish observance of Passover begins at sundown tonight.
NEWS
April 1, 2007
An environmental discussion set April 9 The Howard County Citizens Association invites the community to join in a discussion about protecting and improving the environment at 7:30 p.m. April 9 at the Howard County Conservancy's Gudelsky Center on Mount Pleasant Farm, 10520 Old Frederick Road, Woodstock. Susan Lower, a science teacher at River Hill High School, will talk about "Climate Change: Individuals Can Make a Difference." Local organizations will provide information about their environmental programs, and members of the Howard County Commission on the Environment and Sustainability will attend.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | March 28, 2007
Ever since the Jews fled ancient Egypt with their unleavened bread, matzo has traveled with them to all corners of the Jewish Diaspora. And just as Jewish life has found fresh expression on new soil and with new generations, so has matzo. As Jews prepare for Passover, the seven-day festival that celebrates the Exodus and begins at sundown Monday, their options for matzo, a staple of the ritual meal made of milled grain and water, are nearly as bountiful as the meal itself.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Jacqueline Smelkinson, the hostess, ordered the tent a month ago. Karl Yatovitz, the gefilte fish specialist, came in from Boca Raton, Fla., this week. Lily Friedman, the granddaughter, was helping to set up the tables yesterday. With Passover to begin after sundown tonight, preparations for what might be the city's most renowned seder were well under way. As Jews around the world commemorate the exodus of the ancient Israelites from Egypt and slavery, about 90 guests - family and friends, Jews and non-Jews, arriving from around the country - will gather at the North Baltimore home of Robert and Jacqueline Smelkinson this evening for a celebration that traces its roots back more than 70 years.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
At her first Seder yesterday, 10-year-old Xeniah Merrell had this to say: Matzo was good. The macaroons were better. The fifth-grader already had learned about the Jewish holiday with her classmates at Federal Hill Preparatory School. She had heard her teacher practicing her Hebrew in preparation. Now she was sitting in on a model Seder - listening to the Four Questions, drinking kosher grape juice and singing songs to commemorate the exodus of Jews from Egypt and slavery. "This is interesting," said Xeniah, who said she attends a Christian church.
NEWS
April 15, 2005
Counseling, testing slated at HIV/AIDS awareness workshop The Health and Wellness Ministry of St. John Baptist Church and the Howard County Health Department will sponsor an interactive HIV/AIDS awareness workshop, "Straight Talk About HIV/AIDS in the African-American Community: The Role of the Church," from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. tomorrow at the church, 8910 Old Annapolis Road, Columbia. Discussion will focus on myths and facts, the prevention, care and treatment of the disease, and personal testimony.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
An interfaith gathering of people with AIDS, their friends and their families assembled last night to reflect on the illness and its effects in light of the Israelite story of liberation from slavery. The first Seder of Hope: an Interfaith Gathering for People Touched by AIDS drew about 125 to Har Sinai Congregation in Upper Park Heights for a mock Seder the week before Passover. "This is our story of redemption," said Rabbi Steven Fink of Temple Oheb Shalom, also in Upper Park Heights, as he began the ritual.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1999
A group of teen-agers, some Jewish, some African-American, gathered last night in the basement of a Bolton Hill synagogue to celebrate a pre-Passover Seder expressing two themes shared by their respective cultures: enslavement and liberation.The 50 youths at the Bolton Street Synagogue performed traditional Seder rituals, including eating bitter herbs, drinking four cups of wine (grape juice in this case), breaking the matzo and asking the question, "Why is this night different from all other nights?"
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2004
On Passover, a tale for all generations Every spring, when more than 100 members of her family gather in a tent to celebrate Passover, Neile Friedman and a cousin try to introduce new elements to the Haggadah, or Seder script, they've used for more than two decades. But tonight, Friedman's family and hundreds of others in Baltimore will freshen the ancient tale with a new Haggadah, published by Pikesville's Beth El Congregation and designed to be more in tune with the times. "The Haggadah was becoming so old, it didn't speak to us anymore," said Friedman, who was head of a committee that developed the new one at Beth El. "It was a challenge to keep the children interested."
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2004
In an instant, the multipurpose room was filled with coughing, nose-blowing and red faces. Participants had just swallowed ground horseradish during a model Passover Seder at Howard Community College. But the bitter sharpness was quickly replaced - much to the group's delight - with a bite of a sweet, pasty mixture of apples, nuts, cinnamon and grape juice called charoset. These culinary extremes symbolize the centuries of slavery endured by the ancient Israelites in Egypt and their subsequent exodus, and they are also lessons for life, said Rabbi Hillel Baron of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia, who led the Seder.
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