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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
If you're going to see and hear David Sedaris read at the Meyerhoff on Sunday, keep this in mind: He'll most likely be watching you, too. "He goes on these tours and will read stories that he's working on, and I think there is a kind of feedback that he gets from the audience," says Geoff Kloske, who published Sedaris' first books for Little, Brown. His longtime agent Steve Barclay agrees that the tour is part of Sedaris' creative process. Sedaris is the best-selling author of six books, including Me Talk Pretty One Day and, most recently, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith , tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 28, 2000
"Me Talk Pretty One Day" by David Sedaris (Little Brown, 272 pages, $22.95) Anybody who has read any of David Sedaris's three previous collections of essays ("Naked" seems best known) does not need persuasion to move upward and onward to his latest. He is one of the most artfully funny -- and funnily artful -- writers in America. This grouping of memoir-essays is irresistable -- full of the sort of stuff that made me want to go grab someone to read bits aloud to. He is Kafkaesque in dealing with speech therapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
In 1992, David Sedaris rose - almost elf-like, you might say - into the spotlight by reading from his essay "The Santaland Diaries" on NPR's Morning Edition. With his soft-grained voice and disarmingly understated style of delivery, Sedaris broke a lot of people up recounting his experiences at Macy's in New York, dressed as one of Santa's helpers, guiding kids and their control-freaky parents toward the place where Christmas gift wishes could be expressed and, at least theoretically, granted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | May 30, 2004
Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, by David Sedaris. Little, Brown. 257 pages. $24.95. Twenty-two super short stories -- many less than five pages -- from the It boy of the public radio crowd. Most of the material has already been published, but for those who can't keep up with their New Yorkers, the collection is well worth the read. Sedaris' humor falls squarely in the it's-funny-because-it's-true category. He's written several other books in this vein, including the wildly popular Me Talk Pretty One Day. And, in this new volume, he hits the mark more often than not. A favorite image comes courtesy of Sedaris' North Carolina neighbors, the Tomkeys, who somehow think it is appropriate to trick-or-treat on the day after Halloween.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynell George and Lynell George,Los Angeles Times | July 11, 2004
LOS ANGELES -- David Sedaris isn't trying to change the world. He's just fond of tweaking the universe now and again -- just because he can. So late last month, the author was up to his familiar bent mischief. At the close of his reading to promote his latest book, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, he informed the sold-out crowd of 1,800 at UCLA that he would offer priority signing -- for smokers. A pack of cigarettes would usher the bearer to the front of the line, which, if it was anything like it's been around the country, could be at least a four- to five-hour wait.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2007
Had it with the holidays? Fed up with colored lights and glitter? The Santaland Diaries is a good antidote to seasonal overload. It is a funny but cynical one-man show that takes a nontraditional look at holiday traditions. Rep Stage mounted a production of it last year, and enough Scrooges enjoyed it to persuade the company to bring it back for another run. About 15 years ago, humorist David Sedaris, then an aspiring actor in New York, landed a job as an elf in the Christmas spectacle at Macy's department store.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LAKAIIA WILLIAMS | September 28, 2006
FESTIVAL A TASTE OF ASIAN ART Saturday, Towson University's Asian Arts & Culture Center will present the Many Moons Festival 2006 at the newly renovated Center for the Arts. The festival showcases a variety of traditional and modern Asian artists on three stages. The entertainment includes: Nendaiko (Japanese festival drumming), Somapa Thai Dance (classical Thai dancers) and the Nguyen Family Bamboo Ensemble (Vietnamese musicians). There will also be yoga, martial arts and Chinese doll-making demonstrations, as well as hands-on arts and crafts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2006
Elf's tale The lowdown -- So you think being a Christmas elf is all candy canes and sugar plums? Humorist David Sedaris begs to differ in The Santaland Diaries, based on his experiences as one of Santa's elves at Macy's. Originally read by the author on National Public Radio's Morning Edition in 1992, the Diaries launched Sedaris' career. He subsequently turned his irreverent harangue into a one-man show, and that version is in previews at Columbia's Rep Stage, where it opens Saturday.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
ART LOW COUNTRY ART / / 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Zenith Gallery, 413 7th St. N.W., Washington. Free. 202-783-2963 or zenithgallery.com. ....................... Like the famed Gee's Bend, Ala., quilts that were on view this year at the Walters Art Museum, the distinctive art of South Carolina's Gullah culture comes from slave descendants whose geographical isolation and strong community ties helped to keep their African cultural heritage largely intact over the generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | October 5, 2008
BOOKS David Sedaris: The wickedly funny David Sedaris, whose tales of midget guitar teachers and licking light switches have earned him a cultlike following, is on the road again. The best-selling author will visit 34 cities this fall, testing new material that could end up in his next book. The crowds will even have a chance to ask him questions. He speaks at 8 tonight at the Meyerhoff. For more: ticketmaster.com DVD 'The Visitor': Richard Jenkins stars as a disaffected professor whose life is reshaped after discovering immigrant squatters in his little-used New York flat.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2007
Had it with the holidays? Fed up with colored lights and glitter? The Santaland Diaries is a good antidote to seasonal overload. It is a funny but cynical one-man show that takes a nontraditional look at holiday traditions. Rep Stage mounted a production of it last year, and enough Scrooges enjoyed it to persuade the company to bring it back for another run. About 15 years ago, humorist David Sedaris, then an aspiring actor in New York, landed a job as an elf in the Christmas spectacle at Macy's department store.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
ART LOW COUNTRY ART / / 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Zenith Gallery, 413 7th St. N.W., Washington. Free. 202-783-2963 or zenithgallery.com. ....................... Like the famed Gee's Bend, Ala., quilts that were on view this year at the Walters Art Museum, the distinctive art of South Carolina's Gullah culture comes from slave descendants whose geographical isolation and strong community ties helped to keep their African cultural heritage largely intact over the generations.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2006
Elf's tale The lowdown -- So you think being a Christmas elf is all candy canes and sugar plums? Humorist David Sedaris begs to differ in The Santaland Diaries, based on his experiences as one of Santa's elves at Macy's. Originally read by the author on National Public Radio's Morning Edition in 1992, the Diaries launched Sedaris' career. He subsequently turned his irreverent harangue into a one-man show, and that version is in previews at Columbia's Rep Stage, where it opens Saturday.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | November 14, 2006
Just in time for the holidays, comedian Amy Sedaris has published an entertaining guide that will have people talking about your parties well into the new year. But probably not in a good way. I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence (Warner Books, $27.99) is a cheese-ball collection of recipes, party tips, decorating and gift suggestions. And Sedaris loves cheese balls. They are the centerpiece of all her parties -- she puts an extra one in the bedroom to "de-clump" the guests -- and her favorite time-saving tip is to re-form the cheese balls at the end of the night and use them again at your next party!
ENTERTAINMENT
By LAKAIIA WILLIAMS | September 28, 2006
FESTIVAL A TASTE OF ASIAN ART Saturday, Towson University's Asian Arts & Culture Center will present the Many Moons Festival 2006 at the newly renovated Center for the Arts. The festival showcases a variety of traditional and modern Asian artists on three stages. The entertainment includes: Nendaiko (Japanese festival drumming), Somapa Thai Dance (classical Thai dancers) and the Nguyen Family Bamboo Ensemble (Vietnamese musicians). There will also be yoga, martial arts and Chinese doll-making demonstrations, as well as hands-on arts and crafts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | October 5, 2008
BOOKS David Sedaris: The wickedly funny David Sedaris, whose tales of midget guitar teachers and licking light switches have earned him a cultlike following, is on the road again. The best-selling author will visit 34 cities this fall, testing new material that could end up in his next book. The crowds will even have a chance to ask him questions. He speaks at 8 tonight at the Meyerhoff. For more: ticketmaster.com DVD 'The Visitor': Richard Jenkins stars as a disaffected professor whose life is reshaped after discovering immigrant squatters in his little-used New York flat.
FEATURES
By ROBERT K. ELDER and ROBERT K. ELDER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 11, 2006
NEW YORK -- Chicago Public Radio's hottest show now calls Manhattan home. Well, sort of. As This American Life makes the transition from audio to audio-visual for its coming television series on Showtime, host Ira Glass, a native of Baltimore, is having some trouble settling in. "This is our show in a nutshell," said the bespectacled Glass, staring at two overstuffed boxes of months-old mail shipped from Chicago. "I feel like we don't work anywhere in particular." For the past few months, Glass and his staff have worked mostly out of Left/Right Inc., a spacious but stuffy production office in New York City's bustling Chelsea district.
FEATURES
By ROBERT K. ELDER and ROBERT K. ELDER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 11, 2006
NEW YORK -- Chicago Public Radio's hottest show now calls Manhattan home. Well, sort of. As This American Life makes the transition from audio to audio-visual for its coming television series on Showtime, host Ira Glass, a native of Baltimore, is having some trouble settling in. "This is our show in a nutshell," said the bespectacled Glass, staring at two overstuffed boxes of months-old mail shipped from Chicago. "I feel like we don't work anywhere in particular." For the past few months, Glass and his staff have worked mostly out of Left/Right Inc., a spacious but stuffy production office in New York City's bustling Chelsea district.
NEWS
By AILEEN JACOBSON and AILEEN JACOBSON,NEWSDAY | July 2, 2006
First-time visitors to Amy Sedaris' home in Greenwich Village hear a clanging noise coming from the direction of her apartment as they emerge from the elevator. She uses the sound and a few friendly words to guide them around the right corners. Could she be banging on a pan? After all, Sedaris, though most famous as an actress, is also known as a dedicated cook -- and even has a wacky entertaining book coming out in the fall. And, sure enough: There she is wearing a blue-checked apron over a ruffly white dress -- she loves aprons, she later explains, and often wears them all day. Her apartment is a study in quirkiness: living room adornments include a rubber turkey, a stuffed squirrel and dozens of paintings.
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