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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | January 28, 1992
The local division of Westinghouse Electric Corp. announced yesterday a seven-year partnership with a unit of New York Life Insurance Co. that could provide $50 million to expand Westinghouse's home security business.The arrangement calls for an equity investment from NYLIFE Bridge Investor Inc., a subsidiary of New York Life, and a loan from a London bank, both of which Westinghouse would use to buy the accounts of regional security companies across the country, said Ric Campbell, manager of Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group's security systems unit in Linthicum.
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SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Soccer | November 15, 1995
Security will be beefed up for the Spirit's visit to Cleveland to play the Crunch in a National Professional Soccer League game Friday night.At the suggestion of Spirit general manager Drew Forrester, concerned that Cleveland fans might vent their anger over losing the Browns on Baltimore's indoor soccer team, Crunch general manager Al Miller agreed to add more security guards. They will be stationed at the Cleveland State University Convocation Center, the game site, and at the hotel where the Spirit will stay tomorrow night.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | August 23, 1991
The Orioles are tightening security at Memorial Stadium so memorabilia buffs can't steal parts of the 37-year-old ballpark in its last baseball season.Discussions were held this week between Orioles Director of Stadium Services Roy A. Sommerhof and officials of the city Department of Recreation and Parks, which owns and leases the stadium to the team, Oriole spokesman Rick Vaughn said today.The meetings were in response to the Tuesday night theft of a section of the protective vinyl padding on the fence in center field.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2006
MISSION, Texas -- President Bush visited the Southwest yesterday to highlight recent improvements in border security and to counter the continuing attack by House Republicans on the broad revisions he is seeking in immigration law. In Mission, a parched pocket of the Rio Grande Valley just north of the Mexico border, Bush once again urged Congress to act, reiterating his call for an overhaul of immigration laws that encompasses tougher enforcement, a...
NEWS
By Deborah I. Greene and Deborah I. Greene,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 9, 1990
Calling for tighter security measures at Towson State University, nearly 200 students marched across campus yesterday, stormed the administration building and confronted the school's president with a list of demands.The students, fearful after two rapes within six months, told President Hoke L. Smith they would no longer allow their lives to be "endangered" because of the university's "negligence" in addressing the security issue."We want the administration to know that we wanted to be protected.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1995
In addition to 16 state-of-the-art movie theaters, Towson Marketplace's proposed face lift will focus on security and powerful video cameras that the developer hopes will deter crime and win community support for the project.Signs will be posted throughout the shopping center at Goucher Boulevard and East Joppa Road, letting people know that they and their vehicles are being taped by the cameras, which developer James A. Schlesinger said are strong enough to detect a wart on someone's face half a mile away.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | August 19, 2002
IF YOU THINK flying is nuts these days, you won't get a whole lot of argument from Ron Brothers of Marriottsville. Brothers and his wife, Donna, and their daughter, Brittany, 12, were boarding an America West flight last week in Las Vegas when they came face-to-face with the full lunacy of post-Sept. 11 air travel. They were headed home after a short business trip/mini-vacation - Ron's a computer specialist whose work often takes him to Vegas - and had already endured a flight cancellation and a mix-up with the rescheduled flight.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 9, 1997
All things being relative, Towson Town Center is bracing for a crime wave. Already, the first chilling ripples are creeping along the suburban shoreline. The mall was hit by three garage and parking lot robberies - in the first 10 months of 1996. In some city neighborhoods, this would be known as a very peaceful evening.Still, the future continues to arrive in Baltimore County. At Towson Town, mall officials and county police are adding 10 security cameras at entrances and exits, plus a new police and security substation in a spot where shoppers can see it and feel they've been given a comforting hug, and potential lawbreakers can say, "Oops.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton ordered yesterday that gays and lesbians no longer be considered security risks and that they be granted access to classified government documents on the same basis as other federal employees.His directive puts an end to almost 50 years of official federal discrimination against homosexuals in government, although individual agencies had begun piecemeal reforms in recent years.Advocates for homosexual rights said the order was long overdue."We all know that innumerable lesbians and gay men have served their country loyally and well throughout its history without betraying its trust or giving away secrets," said Rep. Barney Frank, a Massachusetts Democrat who is openly homosexual.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
You wouldn't want to be Willie Coleman. Not this week, anyway.Coleman is in charge of security at Pimlico, and come Saturday, when some of the nation's top thoroughbred horses and about 90,000 racing fans come together for the Preakness, he'll be on call in a big way."It will be a tough week, that's for sure," said Coleman, who has headed security at Pimlico for two years. "But we're ready."If they aren't ready, they will be by Saturday, when a force of 1,700 permanent and fill-in security officers -- a little more than half the size of the Baltimore City police force -- will attempt to keep the horses from the throng and the throng from hurting themselves.
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