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Security Systems

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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
At least four Harford County schools will get security systems in 1993, at a cost of $12,000 to $14,000 a school.The school system, despite tough economic times, decided to make security systems a priority after vandals who broke into Aberdeen High School in August destroyed the school's planetarium.The vandalism caused about $300,000 in damage to the school, which had no security system.The school system has two other planetariums, at Southampton Middle and Edgewood High.L About half of the county's 46 schools have security systems.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Two weeks after the Social Security Administration received a report criticizing management for a dysfunctional, $300 million computer system, agency officials provided only a cursory summary of the findings at a meeting of a committee overseeing the project, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. According to minutes from a June 17 steering committee meeting, agency officials provided limited detail about the report - noting only one of its recommendations, for instance. That lends credibility to claims by congressional Republicans that top officials at the Woodlawn-based agency delayed releasing its full details.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | December 19, 1990
A Baltimore division of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. said yesterday it had signed an agreement to purchase Schlage Electronics, a producer of high-technology security systems used by the White House, airlines and others.The locally based Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group said it had agreed to purchase the commercial-security systems division of Ingersoll-Rand Co.. The price was not disclosed.Schlage, which was founded by employees of the company that makes Schlage-brand locks, makes a security system that limits entry to doorways to people carrying a special card that is thicker than a credit card and can be read by radio receivers.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
He was captured on video using an ATM in Beltsville, later at a McDonald's in Burtonsville and then arriving in a taxi at The Mall in Columbia on Jan. 25. Nineteen-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar also left another tip for investigators by uploading a "selfie" taken inside the store's dressing room moments before he started shooting, creating one final freeze-frame marking the precise time of his attack. Howard County police were not able to trace Aguilar's exact steps in the hours before he opened fire in the mall, killing two clothing store clerks, but surveillance video from around the region helped them account for his actions from the time he left home in College Park at 5:15 a.m. and fired his first shots at 11:14 a.m. Cameras aren't exactly everywhere - they captured Aguilar riding escalators in the mall but missed him as police say he waited near the food court before the shooting - but the range of footage released last week showed just how broad their coverage has become.
NEWS
August 17, 1995
Four years ago, Howard County Councilman Vernon C. Gray introduced a measure to license security systems and to fine owners whose alarms habitually rang false. But after some debate, not one county council member, save for Mr. Gray, voted for the proposed regulations.As time has passed, it has been the police department -- and ultimately the citizens of Howard County -- who have paid for that missed opportunity.The Gray bill was never perfect. Its fine system -- $75 for every third false alarm in a 30-day period or fifth alarm in a 12-month period -- would still have allowed abusers to slip through the cracks.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995
Information Resource Engineering Inc., a White Marsh-based manufacturer of computer security systems whose stock price has sizzled this year, said yesterday that it plans to raise an estimated $23.1 million through a secondary stock offering of 1.15 million shares.IRE said 1 million of the shares will be newly issued, while 150,000 will be sold by current investors.The company said it plans to use the proceeds of the sale to repay $4.1 million in debt, to make capital improvements and for general corporate purposes.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Horn and Patricia Horn,Sun Staff Writer The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | October 2, 1994
The growing belief that today no one is safe, even in the suburbs, has fueled an explosive rise in the number of home security alarms over the last 20 years. Today, 1 in 6 homes has such a system, with 1 million new homeowners coming on line each year.And more and more builders are installing them in new homes. A survey of 428 builders in February by the National Association of Home Builders, a trade group in Washington, found that alarm systems were offered as standard features in 13 percent of new homes and as options in 63 percent of new homes.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Sams and Rachel Sams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 1999
A West Coast security company greets visitors to its Web page with this line from Robert Frost:"Good fences make good neighbors."By that logic, neighborly relations should be at an all-time high, because the "fences" available to homeowners continue improving.Advances in security technology and corresponding decreases in price have changed the home security industry drastically in the past few years.Homeowners can purchase security products and systems that were geared more toward businesses, such as closed-circuit television systems.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe | January 8, 1995
Baltimore law firm forms arbitration groupThe Baltimore law firm of Venable, Baetjer and Howard has formed a new group focusing on arbitration and mediation.Chairman Benjamin R. Civiletti said the alternative dispute resolution group is a "highly efficient, effective method of avoiding some of the costs and disadvantages of traditional litigation."About 20 lawyers have received training to act as mediators or to represent clients during mediation or arbitration.The firm expects mediation or arbitration to be useful in domestic cases, contract disputes and personal injury cases.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2003
Niles Morton was sitting at the kitchen table in his new Howard County home when an automated voice chirped from a small speaker near the floor: "Garage door open." "That's my wife coming into the garage," said Morton, 38, with a grin. The Internet company sales and marketing executive wanted to sleep well in his new home, built on a gently sloping hillside in a former horse pasture. And thanks to some of the latest security gadgets available -- and a $6,000 outlay -- sleep comes easily to Morton and his family.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The security apparatus at a shopping center like The Mall in Columbia is designed to be as sophisticated as it is unobtrusive - off-hours training and drills to prepare employees for shootings and other calamities, surveillance cameras that can capture in real time suspicious persons or behavior. And yet, Darion Marcus Aguilar managed to arrive on Saturday morning at the Columbia mall with a shotgun in a bag and spend about an hour in the food court area before heading to the skate shop Zumiez where he would emerge from a dressing room to kill two employees and then himself.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
Nearly half a million people crowding the nation's regional jails — two thirds of the jail population — are awaiting trial. Many of them are poor people of color incarcerated on non-violent, non-felony charges for an average of two weeks because they can't afford the price of freedom: the going bail rate for their alleged crime. For some, the time in lock-up means lost jobs and homes. Their children may have to move in with a non-parent, or their medical care may be interrupted.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | June 23, 2013
A major problem in the United States is not that there are too many whistle-blowers. Rather, there are too few. Where were the whistle-blowers when the CIA was operating secret prisons; conducting torture and abuse; and kidnapping individuals off the streets in Europe and the Middle East and turning them over to foreign intelligence agencies that conducted torture and abuse? Where were the whistle-blowers when the National Security Agency violated the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution against "unreasonable searches and seizures" and conducted widespread, warrantless eavesdropping?
NEWS
October 15, 2012
The PalmSecure system should not be allowed in a food service setting ("Palm scanner concerns Carroll County parents," Oct. 3). It involves children placing their hands over a common scanning pad and sharing bacteria with other children passing through the cafeteria line. It is filthy, dirty and unsanitary. For decades, we have conducted school lunch programs without using such a highly invasive and unsanitary system. I am surprised that the state health department has not evaluated this plan.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
William Hanson Moore IV, a descendant of Maryland's earliest settlers who for nearly three decades operated a company that installed custom burglar alarms, died last Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of heart failure. The Towson resident was 79. Born in Baltimore, Moore was the son of William H. "Dinty" Moore III, a renowned lacrosse coach at St. John's College and the U.S. Naval Academy who was a founder of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Father and son were direct descendants of Henry Moore, who settled in what is now Charles County in 1649, and John Hanson, who arrived in Maryland in 1653 and whose great-grandson of the same name was president of the first Continental Congress.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | June 14, 2009
For Gregg Perreault, home security is just a cell phone keypad away. The Baltimore County businessman uses his cell phone to control the wireless alarm he installed at a Middle River home he has renovated for sale. If somebody trips the system, he gets a text message. If a real estate agent or subcontractor wants to get into the house, he can deactivate the alarm with his cell phone keypad - from anywhere in the world. With new appliances and valuable copper pipes in the vacant house, it's a system that gives him complete peace of mind, he said.
BUSINESS
By Rebecca Boreczky and Rebecca Boreczky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2003
When it comes to the home of the future, experts often refer to the "smart house" that consumers will want to buy - one that will have wireless computers and elaborate security systems. Real estate and technology experts predict various gadgets will become standard features in residential construction by 2010. As more people work from home and technology continues to dominate today's lifestyles, companies are racing to build more-efficient appliances, better air filtration systems and wireless security systems so homeowners feel healthier and safer.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
A small Annapolis startup is using free software developed by scores of online users to build a data storage company that it claims will be secure enough to store sensitive government data like satellite images of terrorist hideouts in Afghanistan. Exponential Storage hopes to one day persuade the National Security Agency and other government bureaus to hire the company for its data storage network.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | July 18, 2007
Russ Waxter Commercial security system installer ADT Security Services, Columbia Salary --$43,000 Age --56 Years on the job --31 How he got started --Waxter had a friend who worked at ADT so he decided to apply. He landed a job first as a helper, then moved up to an assistant technician. He now works as a lead commercial installation technician. Typical day --Waxter is one of about 20 ADT technicians in the Baltimore area who install security systems for commercial customers. Waxter typically works alone and is responsible for meeting with the client to discuss the service ordered.
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