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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | January 19, 2006
If you bought a computer over the holidays, it may be time to pay the piper for security. Unless, of course, you discover that your piper plays for free. Many consumer PCs come with a trial subscription to an antivirus program, and computer makers often throw in spyware protection and spam filters, too. But these trial versions expire after as little as 30 days, although a 60-day trial is more common. Your PC will let you know, again and again, when the program is heading for expiration.
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NEWS
By Dave Hansen | February 23, 2014
If 2013 has taught us anything, it is that we have a growing data security crisis. Four of the top 10 data breaches of all time occurred last year, with more than 575 million data records accessed, lost or stolen according to one source that tracks data breaches. It seemed every week there was a news story about a major security breach in which customer data was either accessed or stolen. Companies that we all know, use and trust with our personal and financial information were affected, from major retailers and social media companies to financial institutions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | March 21, 2002
This is a story about technology and matrimony, which often coexist uneasily. The basic facts are true, but the names and a few details have been changed because my wife threatened to strangle me if I told everything. The tale involves Hank and Sandy, a happily married couple who suffered from a failure to communicate. Or rather, their PC did. Hank had installed security software on their home computer at the request of his office. The program, which apparently had never been tested anywhere, made Hank's computer so secure that it couldn't communicate with anybody, including their Internet service provider.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Tenable Network Security Inc., an information security software developer based in Columbia, said Wednesday that it had received $50 million in funding from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. The round of funding, the first in Tenable's 10-year history, will allow the firm to expand offerings, accelerate growth and enhance its research into evolving threats, the company said. Tenable recently doubled its number of workers to 200 and said it expected to hire another 200 employees over the next two years.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
George Kenneth Hunter is no stranger to security - as a Naval officer and cryptologist it has been his life's work to keep track of spies to keep the country safe. Now, just a few months from leaving the Navy, Hunter and a few other officers and friends are putting their skills to work in hopes of creating safe computing with a new information security software. Their company, Netta Systems LLC, is one of the latest to enter the county's NeoTech incubator looking for support and hoping to connect with investors - and they've found at least one. The group received $50,000 from the state last week as part of the Department of Business and Economic Development Challenge Program.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Nestled in a Baltimore County business complex is a small, relatively unknown technology company that works quietly every day protecting cell phone conversations, confidential data at major banking institutions and classified communications at federal agencies - security challenges that have gained relevance since Sept. 11, 2001. The company is SafeNet Inc., and you may have never heard of it. Few are likely to know that SafeNet calls White Marsh home, has 227 employees and has a client list that includes Texas Instruments, the Federal Reserve Bank and the Department of Homeland Security.
NEWS
By Dave Hansen | February 23, 2014
If 2013 has taught us anything, it is that we have a growing data security crisis. Four of the top 10 data breaches of all time occurred last year, with more than 575 million data records accessed, lost or stolen according to one source that tracks data breaches. It seemed every week there was a news story about a major security breach in which customer data was either accessed or stolen. Companies that we all know, use and trust with our personal and financial information were affected, from major retailers and social media companies to financial institutions.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Tenable Network Security Inc., an information security software developer based in Columbia, said Wednesday that it had received $50 million in funding from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. The round of funding, the first in Tenable's 10-year history, will allow the firm to expand offerings, accelerate growth and enhance its research into evolving threats, the company said. Tenable recently doubled its number of workers to 200 and said it expected to hire another 200 employees over the next two years.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
Symantec Corp. and its Rockville-based rival, Axent Technologies Inc., will combine forces to thwart hackers and rid the corporate world of computer viruses in a stock-for-stock purchase valued at $975 million, the two companies announced yesterday. Cupertino, Calif.-based Symantec, the largest maker of computer security software for consumers, is offering Axent shareholders one-half share of Symantec stock - a $31.84 value at Wednesday's closing price - for each share of Axent stock they own. That represents a 67 percent premium over Axent's closing price Wednesday, before the purchase was announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2004
Peiter Mudge Zatko is giving up. Zatko is the legendary computer cracker who cofounded Lopht Heavy Industries, a Boston hacker collective that proudly shattered computer security systems and then announced its achievements to the world. Long ago, Zatko went straight, using his skills to build digital moats and barricades around corporate and government computer systems. The work is interesting, and the pay is good. And yet Zatko's efforts have achieved little: No matter how good the defenses he builds are, the bad guys find a way in. That's why Intrusic Inc., the Waltham, Mass.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | January 19, 2006
If you bought a computer over the holidays, it may be time to pay the piper for security. Unless, of course, you discover that your piper plays for free. Many consumer PCs come with a trial subscription to an antivirus program, and computer makers often throw in spyware protection and spam filters, too. But these trial versions expire after as little as 30 days, although a 60-day trial is more common. Your PC will let you know, again and again, when the program is heading for expiration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2004
Peiter Mudge Zatko is giving up. Zatko is the legendary computer cracker who cofounded Lopht Heavy Industries, a Boston hacker collective that proudly shattered computer security systems and then announced its achievements to the world. Long ago, Zatko went straight, using his skills to build digital moats and barricades around corporate and government computer systems. The work is interesting, and the pay is good. And yet Zatko's efforts have achieved little: No matter how good the defenses he builds are, the bad guys find a way in. That's why Intrusic Inc., the Waltham, Mass.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
Nestled in a Baltimore County business complex is a small, relatively unknown technology company that works quietly every day protecting cell phone conversations, confidential data at major banking institutions and classified communications at federal agencies - security challenges that have gained relevance since Sept. 11, 2001. The company is SafeNet Inc., and you may have never heard of it. Few are likely to know that SafeNet calls White Marsh home, has 227 employees and has a client list that includes Texas Instruments, the Federal Reserve Bank and the Department of Homeland Security.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | March 21, 2002
This is a story about technology and matrimony, which often coexist uneasily. The basic facts are true, but the names and a few details have been changed because my wife threatened to strangle me if I told everything. The tale involves Hank and Sandy, a happily married couple who suffered from a failure to communicate. Or rather, their PC did. Hank had installed security software on their home computer at the request of his office. The program, which apparently had never been tested anywhere, made Hank's computer so secure that it couldn't communicate with anybody, including their Internet service provider.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
In a world where viruses and stealth programs abound, protecting your computer from nasty bugs that float around the Internet and hackers on the prowl couldn't be more important. A virus will crash an evening of writing letters or playing games faster than you can call for help. And hackers can turn your PC into an electronic "zombie" that silently attacks other computers on the Internet by flooding them with bogus traffic until they shut down. No one need go without protection because solutions abound - programs that will not only protect you from viruses and hackers but also shield your privacy on the Internet.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
George Kenneth Hunter is no stranger to security - as a Naval officer and cryptologist it has been his life's work to keep track of spies to keep the country safe. Now, just a few months from leaving the Navy, Hunter and a few other officers and friends are putting their skills to work in hopes of creating safe computing with a new information security software. Their company, Netta Systems LLC, is one of the latest to enter the county's NeoTech incubator looking for support and hoping to connect with investors - and they've found at least one. The group received $50,000 from the state last week as part of the Department of Business and Economic Development Challenge Program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
In a world where viruses and stealth programs abound, protecting your computer from nasty bugs that float around the Internet and hackers on the prowl couldn't be more important. A virus will crash an evening of writing letters or playing games faster than you can call for help. And hackers can turn your PC into an electronic "zombie" that silently attacks other computers on the Internet by flooding them with bogus traffic until they shut down. No one need go without protection because solutions abound - programs that will not only protect you from viruses and hackers but also shield your privacy on the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2001
When a Baltimore college student logged onto the Internet with a stolen laptop computer one day in June, he had no idea that the pilfered PC was making a secret call to someone who was looking for it. "Hi, I'm at this location," the computer said. It was all that officials at Absolute Software in Vancouver, British Columbia, needed to track down the laptop at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. It was back in the hands of the school's Audio-Visual Services Department in less than 36 hours, according to police reports.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2001
When a Baltimore college student logged onto the Internet with a stolen laptop computer one day in June, he had no idea that the pilfered PC was making a secret call to someone who was looking for it. "Hi, I'm at this location," the computer said. It was all that officials at Absolute Software in Vancouver, British Columbia, needed to track down the laptop at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. It was back in the hands of the school's Audio-Visual Services Department in less than 36 hours, according to police reports.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2000
Symantec Corp. and its Rockville-based rival, Axent Technologies Inc., will combine forces to thwart hackers and rid the corporate world of computer viruses in a stock-for-stock purchase valued at $975 million, the two companies announced yesterday. Cupertino, Calif.-based Symantec, the largest maker of computer security software for consumers, is offering Axent shareholders one-half share of Symantec stock - a $31.84 value at Wednesday's closing price - for each share of Axent stock they own. That represents a 67 percent premium over Axent's closing price Wednesday, before the purchase was announced.
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