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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
JetBlue Airways is giving a little lift to the federal government shutdown with a plan to "Keep Bills Moving" in Washington. The airline is offering to give fliers with the name "Bill" a faster trip through security at airports in Baltimore, Washington and Virginia. JetBlue passengers who have "Bill" - or any version of it - on their official identification will receive Ever More Speed passes that will usher them to the "quickest possible lane" for security screening. "Whatever our personal politics are, we'd all like to see good legislation moving through Washington ," said Marty St. George , senior vice president marketing and commercial strategy for JetBlue.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
JetBlue Airways is giving a little lift to the federal government shutdown with a plan to "Keep Bills Moving" in Washington. The airline is offering to give fliers with the name "Bill" a faster trip through security at airports in Baltimore, Washington and Virginia. JetBlue passengers who have "Bill" - or any version of it - on their official identification will receive Ever More Speed passes that will usher them to the "quickest possible lane" for security screening. "Whatever our personal politics are, we'd all like to see good legislation moving through Washington ," said Marty St. George , senior vice president marketing and commercial strategy for JetBlue.
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TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2010
The chances that the government will ask to see through your clothing before you board a plane at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be a lot higher starting Tuesday. Advanced imaging technology, which until now has been used only as a backup security method, will become the primary tool for screening passengers at BWI beginning this week, according to the Transportation Security Administration. The move comes despite opposition from privacy advocates, who have challenged the TSA in both Congress and the courts.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Active-duty military personnel using BWI Marshall Airport are eligible to participate in Pre-Check, an expedited security screening, the Transportation Security Administration announced Wednesday. TSA officers staffing the Pre-Check station at Concourse D will scan a service member's Common Access Card to determine if they qualify; service members do not have to be in uniform to be considered. Eligible passengers may be directed to a lane that will allow them to leave their shoes, light outerwear and belt on, keep their laptop in its case and their liquids and gels bag in a carry-on.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - After spending more than $4.5 billion on screening devices to monitor the nation's ports, borders, airports, mail and air, the federal government is moving to replace or alter much of the anti-terrorism equipment, concluding that it is ineffective, unreliable or too expensive to operate. Many of the monitoring tools - intended to detect guns, explosives, and nuclear and biological weapons - were bought during the blitz in security spending after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
If you're age 12 or under, you can throw away the Crocs and flip-flops for that trip to the airport. This week, TSA said it is implementing a new policy that will allow kids to keep their shoes on when going through security screening. In addressing a Congressional committee, according to the Los Angeles Times , Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said the agency will also curb pat-downs of children. The new policy will be implemented soon. The reasoning for the change of heart (or is it sole?
NEWS
June 3, 2002
Procedures speeded for BWI travelers with e-tickets Baltimore-Washington International Airport travelers using e-tickets will find improvements at several of the terminal's ticket counters. US Airways has joined Continental and Northwest Airlines to provide separate counters for passengers with e-tickets who wish to check luggage. The service is meant to ease check-in and allow travelers to quickly check their luggage and proceed to security screening areas. Passengers not checking luggage may go directly to the appropriate security screening areas and receive boarding passes at the gate.
NEWS
December 18, 2000
1 million travelers expected to use airport over holidays Nearly 1 million people are expected to use Baltimore-Washington International Airport during the holiday season, from Wednesday to Jan. 4. More than 76,000 people are expected to travel through BWI on Saturday, which likely will be the busiest day of the 16-day period. The main return days are expected to be Dec. 29 and Jan. 2. About 72,000 people will return from one holiday and then head out to celebrate New Year's. Travelers can check the status of their flights before leaving home by calling the airline directly or checking flight information on the BWI Web site, www.bwiair port.
NEWS
By Jennifer Davis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
If you're traveling through Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport this holiday season, you may notice a few new additions. As BWI embarks on a $100 million expansion project, fliers will notice differences in airline locations, security screening machines, shuttle transportation and more. The changes not only reflect a busy and growing airport, but also the recent intergration of two of BWI's leading carriers. The airport's largest carrier, Southwest Airlines, recently took over operations of AirTran Airways, which has led to major alterations at BWI as the two merge operations.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Work has begun on a $100 million upgrade of the oldest portion of BWI Marshall Airport to streamline security screening by allowing passengers to move among the three busiest concourses without having to pass through security a second time. Airport officials say widening Concourse C — in the 60-year-old central section of what was once Friendship International Airport — will allow them to expand the number of security lines from six to nine. It also will permit the replacement of magnetic-resonance screening machines with larger advanced imaging devices like the ones already used on concourses A and B. The project also will add a moving walkway on the airfield side of the terminal that will connect the 26 gates at concourses A and B used by Southwest Airlines and AirTran Airways with the 14 gates at Concourse C. In addition, Concourse C will be given the level of amenities found at the A and B concourses in approximately 8,500 square feet of new food and retail space.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
With the busiest travel period of the year just a few anxious days away, BWI Marshall Airport is in an all-out push to burnish its reputation as the "easy come, easy go" airport. Wednesday morning, federal security officials added BWI to a pre-screening program that could speed the check-in process for millions of passengers. And before the week is out, officials expect to reopen the airport's longest runway after a $40 million upgrade and repaving, a race against the holiday clock that was complicated by Hurricane Sandy.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Work has begun on a $100 million upgrade of the oldest portion of BWI Marshall Airport to streamline security screening by allowing passengers to move among the three busiest concourses without having to pass through security a second time. Airport officials say widening Concourse C — in the 60-year-old central section of what was once Friendship International Airport — will allow them to expand the number of security lines from six to nine. It also will permit the replacement of magnetic-resonance screening machines with larger advanced imaging devices like the ones already used on concourses A and B. The project also will add a moving walkway on the airfield side of the terminal that will connect the 26 gates at concourses A and B used by Southwest Airlines and AirTran Airways with the 14 gates at Concourse C. In addition, Concourse C will be given the level of amenities found at the A and B concourses in approximately 8,500 square feet of new food and retail space.
NEWS
By Jennifer Davis, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
If you're traveling through Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport this holiday season, you may notice a few new additions. As BWI embarks on a $100 million expansion project, fliers will notice differences in airline locations, security screening machines, shuttle transportation and more. The changes not only reflect a busy and growing airport, but also the recent intergration of two of BWI's leading carriers. The airport's largest carrier, Southwest Airlines, recently took over operations of AirTran Airways, which has led to major alterations at BWI as the two merge operations.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Travelers passing through Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will see extensive changes over the next two years as officials launch a $100 million renovation project that will transform the central section of the airport — including parts that date to its opening in 1950. The project, set to begin next year and to be finished in summer 2013, will allow passengers to move among concourses A, B and C without having to pass through security a second time. It will also replace a narrow checkpoint with a much larger one, which is expected to help relieve congestion during busy travel periods.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
If you're age 12 or under, you can throw away the Crocs and flip-flops for that trip to the airport. This week, TSA said it is implementing a new policy that will allow kids to keep their shoes on when going through security screening. In addressing a Congressional committee, according to the Los Angeles Times , Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said the agency will also curb pat-downs of children. The new policy will be implemented soon. The reasoning for the change of heart (or is it sole?
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2010
The chances that the government will ask to see through your clothing before you board a plane at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be a lot higher starting Tuesday. Advanced imaging technology, which until now has been used only as a backup security method, will become the primary tool for screening passengers at BWI beginning this week, according to the Transportation Security Administration. The move comes despite opposition from privacy advocates, who have challenged the TSA in both Congress and the courts.
NEWS
October 31, 2001
GOP's aviation bill secures safety, leaves president with options The Sun's editorial on the House Republican aviation security bill did not accurately reflect the legislation I authored ("Airport security masquerade," Oct. 23). Last week my bill was endorsed by President Bush as "the quickest, most effective way to increase aviation security." The bill includes numerous programs and measures discussed in detail with aviation security experts. We mandate important changes in aviation security to give the public confidence that vital security measures will be taken immediately.
NEWS
By Saira Khan | January 19, 2010
KARACHI, Pakistan --Last month, as I approached the security checkpoints at John F. Kennedy International Airport, I was apprehensive of what security screening I would have to endure. Considering this was days after the Christmas Day terrorist attempt and that I was traveling to Pakistan, I braced myself for the worst, including a full pat-down and a thorough search of my luggage. Instead, after a short line in the screening area and a brief walk through a metal detector, I was allowed to enter my terminal.
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