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By From Staff Reports | October 28, 1994
A thief using a flimflam Social Security scheme has bilked three elderly people out of thousands of dollars, and police are warning others Social Security recipients to beware.The culprit is a woman who has struck at least three times in the past two weeks: once in Parkville in Baltimore County, and twice in the city, in the 2000 block of N. Wolfe St. and the 900 block of W. Saratoga St.Each time she has posed as a Social Security administrator and called Social Security recipients to "inform" them that they have been overpaid and that they must pay back the excess, said Officer Robert W. Weinhold Jr., a city police spokesman.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 16, 2012
The Social Security Administration announced Tuesday that 56 million retirement beneficiaries are set to get a cost-of-living raise of 1.7 percent next year. The same goes for the 8 million people receiving disability payments from the agency. The raise is tied to inflation. Checks this year went up 3.6 percent, after two years when inflation was so low that beneficiaries didn't get a raise at all. In addition, the agency announced that the level of earnings subject to the Social Security tax is going upĀ $3,600 to $113,700 next year.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an election-year bow to older Americans, Democratic and Republican leaders in the House have decided to act quickly today on legislation that would double the amount Social Security recipients between the ages of 65 and 69 may earn without losing benefits.The politically popular bill would increase the Social Security earnings test from the present $10,200 a year to $20,000 in 1997, allowing beneficiaries to receive up to that amount in wages or salary without penalty.It also would provide increased benefits to widows or widowers who are now over 80 but were under the normal retirement age of 65 when their spouses died.
NEWS
July 14, 2011
President Barack Obama says that unless our government can come to a decision about the national debt ceiling, then Social Security benefits cannot be paid on August 3rd. ("White House sounds alarm," July 13). Congress and the administration shouldn't get paid, since they aren't doing their jobs. Are their checks issued on the 1st? Stop payment and give it to Social Security recipients, many of whom have nothing to fall back on at all. Sydney Roby
NEWS
December 17, 1995
AT THE SAME TIME Congress is contemplating plans to reduce the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income workers, it is raising the amount of money seniors can earn without reducing their Social Security benefits. The logic behind these contradictory efforts is difficult to fathom.Congress should be removing all disincentives to working without selectively choosing among various age groups. With the entire Social Security system headed toward insolvency in the next century, all measures that keep seniors working longer and delaying retirement are in the national interest.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Beginning today, women eligible for Medicare will be covered for some breast cancer examinations. The new benefit is one of several federal health care changes that took effect with the new year.The new breast cancer coverage provides federal subsidies for a mammogram once every two years for women over age 65. For disabled women who qualify for Medicare, the benefit provides coverage for a single base-line screening for women ages 35 to 39, every two years for those 40 to 49 and annual exams for those 50 to 64.Last July, Medicare began covering Pap smear tests for cervical cancer.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an election-year bow to older Americans, Democratic and Republican leaders in the House have decided to act quickly today on legislation that would double the amount Social Security recipients between the ages of 65 and 69 may earn without losing benefits.The politically popular bill would increase the Social Security earnings test from the present $10,200 a year to $20,000 in 1997, allowing beneficiaries to receive up to that amount in wages or salary without penalty.It also would provide increased benefits to widows or widowers who are now over 80 but were under the normal retirement age of 65 when their spouses died.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | January 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As President Clinton's economic program begins to take shape, it appears increasingly likely that he will call for higher taxes on Social Security benefits received by the 8 million Americans who have outside incomes.The proposal is considered by many of the congressional leaders Mr. Clinton has consulted to be among the best of a bad lot of options for addressing the nation's deficit crisis, and it is on the short list of alternatives the president took with him this weekend for a economic strategy session at Camp David, Md.Although raising taxes on Social Security benefits would spark an immediate outcry from the influential advocates for elderly Americans, it holds the dual appeal of fitting Mr. Clinton's theme of balanced sacrifice while also offering a substantial source of new revenue.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
MIAMI -- In a major shift of strategy, Paul E. Tsongas is coming out swinging against Bill Clinton in the race for the Democratic nomination.His new, fighting pose, unveiled as the campaign enters perhaps its most crucial 10-day phase, underscores the extent to which style and tactics are replacing substance in the Democratic contest.Many politicians expect a clear front-runner to emerge 10 days from now, after a round of 13 primaries and caucuses concludes with elections in Illinois and Michigan on March 17. That leader will be either Mr. Clinton or Mr. Tsongas, whose positions on most major issues are either similar or complementary.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Biggs | May 26, 2009
There's a cola war going on, but it has nothing to do with Coke versus Pepsi. It began earlier this month, when the Congressional Budget Office projected that for the first time in three decades, there would be no cost-of-living adjustment - or COLA - for Social Security recipients in 2010, 2011 and 2012. These adjustments are designed to keep elderly Social Security recipients from losing purchasing power as prices rise, so it's not surprising that the initial reaction was one of concern.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Biggs | May 26, 2009
There's a cola war going on, but it has nothing to do with Coke versus Pepsi. It began earlier this month, when the Congressional Budget Office projected that for the first time in three decades, there would be no cost-of-living adjustment - or COLA - for Social Security recipients in 2010, 2011 and 2012. These adjustments are designed to keep elderly Social Security recipients from losing purchasing power as prices rise, so it's not surprising that the initial reaction was one of concern.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 11, 2000
Today's issue in the news is: Social Security. Is Social Security safe? Experts tell us that unless we implement meaningful reform soon, the entire system will go bankrupt by the year 2050, plunging the nation into chaos and despair. I personally plan to be dead. So we don't need to worry about it. Instead, let's talk about the ongoing debate over what, exactly, the Lone Ranger shouted to his horse, Silver, when he rode off into the sunset. As you may recall if you have no life, in a recent column I stated that I had always believed the Lone Ranger shouted "Hi-ho, Silver!
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 17, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Ever since the late Barry Goldwater proposed making Social Security voluntary, the hallowed federal system of old-age benefits has been known as the third rail of American politics. That is, like the power source on railroad and subway tracks, if you touch it, you'll be instantly fried. Well, Texas Gov. George W. Bush has grabbed it with both hands in his campaign proposal to save the system by proposing that Americans be able to invest a portion of their Social Security funds in private accounts.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 1996
The Social Security Administration has determined that 700,000 Americans have been shortchanged of more than $850 million in retirement benefits since 1972 because of a major computer mix-up, agency officials disclosed yesterday in Woodlawn.Although the Social Security Administration recognized two years ago that there was a glitch ticking in its computers, only recently did it determine the extent and complexity of the problem.The agency already is making back payments of nearly $400 million to about 402,000 retirees.
NEWS
December 17, 1995
AT THE SAME TIME Congress is contemplating plans to reduce the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income workers, it is raising the amount of money seniors can earn without reducing their Social Security benefits. The logic behind these contradictory efforts is difficult to fathom.Congress should be removing all disincentives to working without selectively choosing among various age groups. With the entire Social Security system headed toward insolvency in the next century, all measures that keep seniors working longer and delaying retirement are in the national interest.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Working Americans who collect Social Security retirement checks would be able to earn up to $30,000 a year without losing any of their benefits under a bill that began moving through the House yesterday.Senior citizens groups welcomed the legislation, which -- if enacted -- would mean higher retirement checks for nearly 1 million beneficiaries ages 65 to 69. Retirees who are over 70 now are allowed to collect full benefits regardless of their earnings.Under current law, retirees ages 65 to 69 can earn $11,520 next year without seeing their retirement check reduced -- an amount that is scheduled to rise to $14,400 in 2002.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Deficit-reduction proposals being discussed by the Clinton administration, especially those curtailing Social Security benefits, are finding plenty of congressional critics.A senior Treasury official said yesterday that the administration will propose reductions in the rate of growth of Social Security benefits, but the Senate's chief tax writer, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y., said that freezing the benefits would be a political "death wish."Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Roger Altman said in a television interview aired yesterday that eliminating the annual cost-of-living raise in Social Security payments is under consideration as the White House puts together its economic plan.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | October 28, 1994
A thief using a flimflam Social Security scheme has bilked three elderly people out of thousands of dollars, and police are warning others Social Security recipients to beware.The culprit is a woman who has struck at least three times in the past two weeks: once in Parkville in Baltimore County, and twice in the city, in the 2000 block of N. Wolfe St. and the 900 block of W. Saratoga St.Each time she has posed as a Social Security administrator and called Social Security recipients to "inform" them that they have been overpaid and that they must pay back the excess, said Officer Robert W. Weinhold Jr., a city police spokesman.
NEWS
February 18, 1993
Taxing PensionersWhile I appreciate the need to reduce the deficit, I am appalled at some of the suggestions that are surfacing from the administration and seem to be embraced by many members of Congress.Specially, the biggest offender in my judgment is the suggestion that Social Security recipients whose income is greater than $25,000 a year ($32,000 for a couple) have 85 percent of their Social Security benefits taxed instead of the present 50 percent.Most such couples can hardly be considered affluent.
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