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By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Brittany Kamasinski had heard nothing of the NFL's new security measures when she reached the gates at M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday for a public Ravens practice. So the Dundalk resident was startled when stadium workers told her she could not enter carrying a baby bag stuffed with diapers, bottles and formula for her 7-month-old daughter. “Oh well, that's just great!” she thought sarcastically as she and her husband trudged back to their car with the bag. They transferred the baby items to the pockets of his cargo shorts.
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SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Anyone who has competed in a road race knows that extra police and security are as much a part of the event as water stops and cheering spectators. But the last time John Gilligan ran the Boston Marathon in 2012 - a year before two bombs exploded near the finish line and changed the racing landscape - he didn't take notice of law enforcement. "I don't remember any security. You didn't think about it," said Gilligan, a 46-year-old Towson resident. "It didn't occur to anybody. You just hopped on the buses … You [could]
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TOPIC
By Alan Isenberg and Borut Grgic and Alan Isenberg and Borut Grgic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2002
Last week in Prague, with a celebratory tone, NATO opened its doors to seven formerly communist countries - Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. But the meeting hall was filled with nearly as many divergent agendas as it was with flags and diplomats. With Europe retreating from power projection as it embarks on its grand journey toward enlargement, and America more intent on expanding its influence than ever, the relevance of NATO as more than a diffuse political club is in question.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Brittany Kamasinski had heard nothing of the NFL's new security measures when she reached the gates at M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday for a public Ravens practice. So the Dundalk resident was startled when stadium workers told her she could not enter carrying a baby bag stuffed with diapers, bottles and formula for her 7-month-old daughter. “Oh well, that's just great!” she thought sarcastically as she and her husband trudged back to their car with the bag. They transferred the baby items to the pockets of his cargo shorts.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2002
Alvin M. David, a retired Social Security executive who was an architect of Medicare and other programs that extended benefits to broad categories of wage earners, died of a stroke Thursday at his Chicago home. He was 95 and had lived in Ellicott City and, earlier, Windsor Hills before retiring about 30 years ago. As the Social Security Administration's chief policy maker in its formative years, he was part of a team credited with developing all of its major milestones. "He was one of the very small group of people primarily responsible for the development of the American Social Security system," said former SSA Commissioner Robert Ball of Alexandria, Va. "Although he was little known to the public," Mr. Ball said, "he made major contributions, helping to add survivors' insurance, disability insurance and Medicare to the program -- and extending coverage to just about every worker in the country.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
CHARLOTTE -- A campaign aide for Maryland congressional candidate John Delaney was featured in a video honoring Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans that played before thousands of Democrats gathered in Charlotte on Thursday for the Democratic National Convention. Ian Golden, who is 27 and lives in Washington, served in the Army from 2004 to 2010, including as an infantry sergeant in Iraq from 2007 to 2009. He overees veterans affairs and national security policy for Delaney, a Democrat who is running for the House in Maryland's 6th District.
NEWS
By Charles H. White Jr | April 19, 2007
Congress has at last recognized and moved to fix a gaping breach in America's homeland security: railroad and transit system security. Unfortunately, the Senate and House bills come with veto provocations. The Senate bill enacting much of the 9/11 commission's recommendations has a provision authorizing collective bargaining by aviation security workers. The House bill embraces whistleblower protections for employees involved in security projects. Both bills apparently are nonstarters in the White House's view.
NEWS
September 22, 2002
PRESIDENT BUSH'S threat to make war on Iraq comes straight from the playbook of newly released post-Sept. 11 national security policy. Over the decade since the fall of the Soviet Union, the nation moved from Cold War deterrence to superpower cooperation. Now Mr. Bush says the threat from terrorism is so outside the bounds of traditional geopolitical calculations that the United States has to strike at it first wherever possible. He is indeed correct that the devastating attacks on our country by a small band of suicidal thugs who lived among us for months call for a much different way of viewing national security threats.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
A new policy announced by the NFL on Thursday will prevent Ravens fans from carrying most bags into M&T Bank Stadium this season unless they are made of a clear material. The change follows a national trend toward increased security measures at sporting events, including the Preakness, in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing. Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev allegedly used bombs made from pressure cookers concealed in backpacks to kill three people and injure 264 near the finish line of the race.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
A failure to explain faith in port deal Although the deal for Dubai Ports World to acquire control of some operations at U.S. ports may be postponed, the Bush administration's threat to veto any law blocking U.S. approval of the deal clearly tells us something critical about the administration's view of the role of the public in the definition of national security policy ("Port delay offered," Feb. 24). While the administration did an effective job convincing Americans that Iraq posed a threat to their security before the war, it has utterly failed to explain, even to members of its own party, why this port deal does not pose a threat.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
A new policy announced by the NFL on Thursday will prevent Ravens fans from carrying most bags into M&T Bank Stadium this season unless they are made of a clear material. The change follows a national trend toward increased security measures at sporting events, including the Preakness, in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing. Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev allegedly used bombs made from pressure cookers concealed in backpacks to kill three people and injure 264 near the finish line of the race.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
On the third Saturday in May, generations of Baltimoreans marched onto the infield at Pimlico Race Course with their coolers in tow, an image that helped define the Preakness Stakes. No longer. The Maryland Jockey Club has unveiled enhanced security plans for the 138th Preakness Stakes in the wake of recent deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon. And coolers are among the casualties. Fans will be subject to electronic wand searches at all gates for the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes on May 17 and the Preakness on May 18. They will not be allowed to carry backpacks or duffel bags into the races and only smaller, see-through-plastic containers will be permitted.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
On the third Saturday in May, generations of Baltimoreans marched onto the infield at Pimlico Race Course with their coolers in tow, an image that helped define the Preakness Stakes. No longer. The Maryland Jockey Club has unveiled enhanced security plans for the 138th Preakness Stakes in the wake of recent deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon. And coolers are among the casualties. Fans will be subject to electronic wand searches at all gates for the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes on May 17 and the Preakness on May 18. They will not be allowed to carry backpacks or duffel bags into the races and only smaller, see-through-plastic containers will be permitted.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
CHARLOTTE -- A campaign aide for Maryland congressional candidate John Delaney was featured in a video honoring Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans that played before thousands of Democrats gathered in Charlotte on Thursday for the Democratic National Convention. Ian Golden, who is 27 and lives in Washington, served in the Army from 2004 to 2010, including as an infantry sergeant in Iraq from 2007 to 2009. He overees veterans affairs and national security policy for Delaney, a Democrat who is running for the House in Maryland's 6th District.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Baltimore County officials will review school security policies after a man entered a bathroom in a Dundalk middle school during classroom hours Thursday and attempted to assault a seventh-grade boy. The intruder, whose name was being withheld pending charges, apparently sneaked into Holabird Middle School, said Charles Herndon, a spokesman for the county school system. He had been stopped earlier in a hallway by a teacher and was directed to the administration office to check in, according to Herndon.
NEWS
By Charles H. White Jr | April 19, 2007
Congress has at last recognized and moved to fix a gaping breach in America's homeland security: railroad and transit system security. Unfortunately, the Senate and House bills come with veto provocations. The Senate bill enacting much of the 9/11 commission's recommendations has a provision authorizing collective bargaining by aviation security workers. The House bill embraces whistleblower protections for employees involved in security projects. Both bills apparently are nonstarters in the White House's view.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Anyone who has competed in a road race knows that extra police and security are as much a part of the event as water stops and cheering spectators. But the last time John Gilligan ran the Boston Marathon in 2012 - a year before two bombs exploded near the finish line and changed the racing landscape - he didn't take notice of law enforcement. "I don't remember any security. You didn't think about it," said Gilligan, a 46-year-old Towson resident. "It didn't occur to anybody. You just hopped on the buses … You [could]
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
On the third Saturday in May, generations of Baltimoreans marched onto the infield at Pimlico Race Course with their coolers in tow, an image that helped define the Preakness Stakes. No longer. The Maryland Jockey Club has unveiled enhanced security plans for the 138th Preakness Stakes in the wake of recent deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon. And coolers are among the casualties. Fans will be subject to electronic wand searches at all gates for the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes on May 17 and the Preakness on May 18. They will not be allowed to carry backpacks or duffel bags into the races and only smaller, see-through-plastic containers will be permitted.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, delivering the weekly Democratic radio address yesterday, said the Bush administration and congressional Republicans "have failed to back up their rhetoric with robust action" when it comes to national security. "Today, unfortunately, our nation and our people are not as safe as they could - and should - be," he said, adding that Democrats would do a better job than Republicans have on crucial issues such as port and transit security. In recent weeks, Democrats have worked to pledge their commitment to security issues, hoping it will help them win the confidence of voters in this fall's midterm elections.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
A failure to explain faith in port deal Although the deal for Dubai Ports World to acquire control of some operations at U.S. ports may be postponed, the Bush administration's threat to veto any law blocking U.S. approval of the deal clearly tells us something critical about the administration's view of the role of the public in the definition of national security policy ("Port delay offered," Feb. 24). While the administration did an effective job convincing Americans that Iraq posed a threat to their security before the war, it has utterly failed to explain, even to members of its own party, why this port deal does not pose a threat.
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