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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Under heavy pressure from U.S. officials, the Palestinian police force in Jericho said yesterday it had begun investigating the death in custody last week of a Palestinian-American who had been taken for questioning to the Palestinian self-rule zone.The body of the man, Azzam Muhammad Ibrahim Muslih, 52, was returned to his family Friday, two days after he was arrested in the West Bank village of Ein Yabrud, apparently by agents of the Palestinian security police based in Jericho.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
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NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
The reopening of the Steve Biko case last week, on the 20th anniversary of the black consciousness leader's death, revives memories of white-ruled South Africa's most feared state instrument: the Bureau of State Security, better known as BOSS. It was at the height of its powers from 1966 to 1979, when South Africa was led by John Vorster, a figure who had no intention of ever sharing power with blacks. BOSS was exactly what the acronym said -- in charge, and with vast powers. It operated with few legal restraints; no measure was too drastic if it served to eliminate the perceived enemies of the state.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two more U.S. soldiers were reported killed yesterday in insurgent attacks as President Bush, on a tour of Africa, said that "there's no question we've got security issues in Iraq." In Fallujah, an opposition hotbed near Baghdad, newly redeployed Iraqi police threatened to resign by the weekend if U.S. troops don't pull out of town. The presence of the soldiers, the police said, makes their officers a target and puts them in danger. In Baghdad, Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, head of coalition forces in Iraq, said crime in the gunfire-racked capital is largely under control, despite evidence of a growing spate of carjackings and home robberies by armed gangs.
NEWS
By Timothy M. Phelps | September 14, 1997
Unlike the passing of Princess Diana and Mother Teresa, that of Mobutu Sese Seko, late of Zaire, will not be mourned around the world. Especially not by me. I spent 10 terrifying days in 1983 detained by the Zairian secret police at the orders of "the guide," as Mobutu called himself.It was a trifle compared to what happened to the average political prisoner there. But the ordeal taught me an appreciation for the U.S. Bill of Rights and skepticism of U.S. foreign policy, which was to support Mobutu until nearly the end.I had just completed an arduous six-week journey up the Congo River and across Zaire, now renamed the Democratic Republic of Congo.
NEWS
By Marc LeGoff and Marc LeGoff,Staff writer | January 20, 1991
After serving five months in Saudi Arabia, Air Force Sgt. Steven D. Houck knew that the Jan. 15 deadline for Iraqi troops to pull out of Kuwait was drawing close. He was prepared to go to war and do his part to preserve world order.About the last place he expected to be Jan. 15 was Columbia.But on Jan. 10, with a PCS -- permanent change of station -- assignment, Houck boarded a plane to come home. He will transfer to an Air Force base in Turkey in early March."I knew I had a PCS coming up around this time," the security police specialist said.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | October 1, 1991
First Lt. Benjamin H. Cohey, commander of the Maryland State Police Security barrack in Woodlawn, heard the rumors that troopers might be laid off, but he never thought it would happen and he never thought his name would be on the list."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
The two men wore body armor with "POLICE" written across the chest and spilled out of their unmarked car, weapons drawn, ordering Christopher Dukes and his passenger out of their vehicle at a South Baltimore gas station parking lot. When Dukes pulled off, they embarked on a high-speed chase down Interstate 295 until catching up and placing the pair under arrest, charging documents show. Then it was time for the real police to take over. The men in the body armor were not Baltimore police officers or federal agents, but instead a little-known classification of security guards known as "special police," who are commissioned by the city or state to arrest and detain citizens - but only on specific properties.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
He is suspected of being a one-man crime wave who for months preyed on some of Baltimore's most historic enclaves by breaking into homes and stealing their most prized treasures.Missing items -- most of which will likely never be recovered -- include century-old cast-iron light fixtures from Victorian Bolton Hill, ornate window grates from Charles Village and kerosene lamps from Madison Park."He likes expensive things," said Maj. Steven McMahon, commander of the Central District police station.
NEWS
October 31, 1995
SINCE LAST WEEK'S shooting on the Anne Arundel portion of the Central Light Rail line, some riders are wondering whether they should get back in their cars or just stay home.That's not hard to understand. Whenever a plane crashes, a lot of folks think twice about flying, too. Sooner or later, though, they must get past that immediate reaction and ask whether the incident that spawned their fear was a fluke or the result of errors and circumstances likely to be repeated. They also must consider whether the response to it inspires confidence or doubt.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1997
It's almost as good as a sale: The total number of crimes committed at two of the three largest malls in Baltimore County declined slightly in the first half of this year, according to police statistics released this week.Security has been increased at the two malls -- Towson Town Center and Security Square Mall -- in the last year, and spokespersons for both malls, as well as police, said increased patrols and other measures helped keep crime down.Countywide, the total number of crimes increased at five malls, stayed the same at one and dropped at the remaining four.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
The reopening of the Steve Biko case last week, on the 20th anniversary of the black consciousness leader's death, revives memories of white-ruled South Africa's most feared state instrument: the Bureau of State Security, better known as BOSS. It was at the height of its powers from 1966 to 1979, when South Africa was led by John Vorster, a figure who had no intention of ever sharing power with blacks. BOSS was exactly what the acronym said -- in charge, and with vast powers. It operated with few legal restraints; no measure was too drastic if it served to eliminate the perceived enemies of the state.
NEWS
By Timothy M. Phelps | September 14, 1997
Unlike the passing of Princess Diana and Mother Teresa, that of Mobutu Sese Seko, late of Zaire, will not be mourned around the world. Especially not by me. I spent 10 terrifying days in 1983 detained by the Zairian secret police at the orders of "the guide," as Mobutu called himself.It was a trifle compared to what happened to the average political prisoner there. But the ordeal taught me an appreciation for the U.S. Bill of Rights and skepticism of U.S. foreign policy, which was to support Mobutu until nearly the end.I had just completed an arduous six-week journey up the Congo River and across Zaire, now renamed the Democratic Republic of Congo.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
He is suspected of being a one-man crime wave who for months preyed on some of Baltimore's most historic enclaves by breaking into homes and stealing their most prized treasures.Missing items -- most of which will likely never be recovered -- include century-old cast-iron light fixtures from Victorian Bolton Hill, ornate window grates from Charles Village and kerosene lamps from Madison Park."He likes expensive things," said Maj. Steven McMahon, commander of the Central District police station.
NEWS
October 31, 1995
SINCE LAST WEEK'S shooting on the Anne Arundel portion of the Central Light Rail line, some riders are wondering whether they should get back in their cars or just stay home.That's not hard to understand. Whenever a plane crashes, a lot of folks think twice about flying, too. Sooner or later, though, they must get past that immediate reaction and ask whether the incident that spawned their fear was a fluke or the result of errors and circumstances likely to be repeated. They also must consider whether the response to it inspires confidence or doubt.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1995
JERUSALEM -- Under heavy pressure from U.S. officials, the Palestinian police force in Jericho said yesterday it had begun investigating the death in custody last week of a Palestinian-American who had been taken for questioning to the Palestinian self-rule zone.The body of the man, Azzam Muhammad Ibrahim Muslih, 52, was returned to his family Friday, two days after he was arrested in the West Bank village of Ein Yabrud, apparently by agents of the Palestinian security police based in Jericho.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1997
It's almost as good as a sale: The total number of crimes committed at two of the three largest malls in Baltimore County declined slightly in the first half of this year, according to police statistics released this week.Security has been increased at the two malls -- Towson Town Center and Security Square Mall -- in the last year, and spokespersons for both malls, as well as police, said increased patrols and other measures helped keep crime down.Countywide, the total number of crimes increased at five malls, stayed the same at one and dropped at the remaining four.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer Staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | September 13, 1993
Residents of Bowie's Northridge community, a portrait of serene suburban security, lately find themselves confronting a strange, new neighbor: terror.They live in $200,000 and $300,000 houses surrounded by old trees that once made the new subdivision look established, settled and even more safe. But these days the trees seem to cast sinister shadows over the fine lawns where a rapist in a black mask carrying a crossbow has walked in the dead of night."We're not supposed to cut down the trees, but come this fall, we are going to be out here with a chain saw," said one woman who would only give her name as Susan.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer Staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | September 13, 1993
Residents of Bowie's Northridge community, a portrait of serene suburban security, lately find themselves confronting a strange, new neighbor: terror.They live in $200,000 and $300,000 houses surrounded by old trees that once made the new subdivision look established, settled and even more safe. But these days the trees seem to cast sinister shadows over the fine lawns where a rapist in a black mask carrying a crossbow has walked in the dead of night."We're not supposed to cut down the trees, but come this fall, we are going to be out here with a chain saw," said one woman who would only give her name as Susan.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | October 1, 1991
First Lt. Benjamin H. Cohey, commander of the Maryland State Police Security barrack in Woodlawn, heard the rumors that troopers might be laid off, but he never thought it would happen and he never thought his name would be on the list."
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