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BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | April 4, 2004
If you were 65 or older on Jan. 1, 2004, you may not have to file a tax return as long as you don't trip the income trigger. According to the Internal Revenue Service, you must file a return if your filing status is: Single and you have non-Social Security income of more than $8,950. Head of household and your non-Social Security income is more than $11,200. Married, filing jointly and either you or your spouse is 65 or older and you have non-Social Security income of more than $16,550.
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NEWS
By Hank Greenberg | December 3, 2012
The way some people talk in Washington, you could get the idea that Social Security and Medicare are little more than numbers in a budget. Yet for families in Maryland and all over America, Social Security and Medicare have a deeper meaning: They are the very foundation of security in retirement. Social Security and Medicare enable millions of older Americans to survive financially each month, after years of working hard and paying taxes to earn these protections. One day, younger people will count on these same pillars of security for their own independence and dignity in old age. Here are a couple numbers that lawmakers considering cuts to these programs should keep in mind: Half of America's seniors get by on less than $20,000 a year.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
Nearly half the people who sought public shelter in Maryland one week this summer were families and more than two-thirds had some source of income, according to a report released today.The report also indicates that the number of times individuals or families are turned away from the shelters on a given evening will be 20 percent higher in 1990 than in 1989. Families will make up half of those turned away.These figures came from a survey conducted by Action for the Homeless Inc. spanning a week in July.
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | April 4, 2004
If you were 65 or older on Jan. 1, 2004, you may not have to file a tax return as long as you don't trip the income trigger. According to the Internal Revenue Service, you must file a return if your filing status is: Single and you have non-Social Security income of more than $8,950. Head of household and your non-Social Security income is more than $11,200. Married, filing jointly and either you or your spouse is 65 or older and you have non-Social Security income of more than $16,550.
NEWS
January 14, 1994
STUDENTS at Yale University have devised an interesting way to relieve stress during that most dreaded time of college life, final exams. Dressed in little more than their sneakers, a few undergraduate males ran through the Yale library last month shouting "Merry Christmas!" and pelting students buried deep in thought with candy.Streaking on college campuses is really nothing unusual. The University of Virginia and Princeton (home of the infamous Nude Olympics) have long traditions of such naked jaunts.
NEWS
February 18, 1995
Nowhere in the reforms under consideration by the new Republican Congress will the distinction between lean government and mean government be more obvious than in the $25 billion Social Security program known as Supplemental Security Income (SSI). These are the abuse-prone grants described in detail recently by Sun reporters John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner.There is no question that the SSI program needs a thorough examination, along with some better ways of screening applicants and monitoring those already on the rolls.
NEWS
February 4, 1995
A Great DisserviceI am writing in response to your front-page reports (Jan. 22-Jan. 25) on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for children.As a social service provider in Baltimore City, I see the immense benefit that monthly SSI benefits have for families who have children with disabilities. I thought your first two articles were horribly misrepresentative.The vast majority of families are able to obtain necessary medical supplies, housing, food and other needed items that medical assistance and other insurance programs will not cover.
NEWS
January 25, 1995
Anyone who thought it would be easy to truly reform welfare -- or even to root out the old devils of waste, fraud and abuse -- has surely been chastened by The Sun's illuminating four-day series on the Social Security Administration's disability programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Disability Insurance (DI).Entire families who earn a comfortable livelihood by simply remaining nonproductive; children who are scolded for achieving at school because it would endanger their disability payments; addicts whose skids into the gutter are greased by government checks; immigrants who are systematically coached to lie to the government so they can get a monthly handout -- these and other horror stories chronicled by reporters John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner cannot be blamed solely on criminal minds determined to bilk the taxpayers.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1991, Washington Post Writers Group | August 11, 1991
New York -- Are you out of a job and without the money to pay the rent? Newly divorced and unable to maintain a home of your own? A longtime widow slowly running out of cash? Struggling on a salary so grievously low that you're forced to live in a dump?Think about home-sharing. Under this arrangement, a boarder rents a room from a homeowner and shares access to the rest of the house. Often, the homeowner is older. The boarder may help with the chores in return for a low rent.For boarders, it means a pleasant home in a neighborhood they otherwise might not be able to afford.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A small but growing Social Security Administration effort to encourage recipients of one of its disability programs to go to work is poorly run and subject to abuse, according to congressional investigators.The agency "has done a poor job of implementing and managing" the program, which costs $30 million a year, and has given its staff few criteria and little training for running it, said the General Accounting Office in a report delivered to Congress yesterday.The GAO also said the program lacked clear goals and sufficient information to monitor its effectiveness.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a sharp challenge to President Clinton, Republican congressional leaders vowed yesterday to quickly end decades of dependence on Social Security surpluses that have helped pay for spending programs and tax cuts.Concluding weeks of private negotiations, House and Senate Republican leaders announced an agreement on a budget blueprint for 2000 that would also preserve the current spending ceilings.The plan would delay most of a proposed election-year tax cut until well into the next president's term.
NEWS
By PETER EDELMAN | May 11, 1997
WELFARE IS an issue that epitomizes how President Clinton uses studied ambiguity to present himself as a walking political Rorschach test. His presentation allows people to see in him what they want to see, the same words somehow communicating positively to "new" Democrats and traditional liberals simultaneously.In 1992, candidate Clinton proposed to "end welfare as we know it" and succeeded in attracting center-right voters without alienating the traditional Democratic base. More conservative voters heard a get-tough message; the party faithful heard jobs.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1997
Alicia Garza Burton of Hyattsville wasn't worried when President Clinton signed the new welfare law last year, the one that threatens benefits to Burton and other legal immigrants unless they become citizens.A 64-year-old disabled widow who arrived here from Mexico in 1949, Burton survives on a monthly Supplemental Security Income (SSI) check. Yet when the law was enacted, she told friends: "Let sleeping dogs lie." Sister Mary Wendeln, a Catholic nun who works with low-income Hispanics in Maryland, replied: "Honey, this dog isn't sleeping."
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has adopted regulations that will end disability checks for an estimated 135,000 poor children, outraging children's advocates who contend that the move was driven simply by an effort to save money.At a briefing yesterday on the fiscal 1998 budget, outgoing Social Security Commissioner Shirley S. Chater announced that she had signed the regulations, which set a higher standard for ** children to qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
Last summer, a Social Security judge awarded disability benefits to a 32-year-old drug addict who supported a $120-a-day habit by dealing drugs.The July case offers a rare insight into Social Security's troubled disability programs and, according to a whistle-blower, is an illustration of the costly failure of managers in her California office to insist that sometimes ambiguous regulations be followed.Addicts and alcoholics collect hundreds of thousands of dollars in excess benefits annually because caseworkers are discouraged from enforcing the rules, says Victoria Thacker, the whistle-blower.
NEWS
March 24, 1996
SSI provides income floor for needyI am writing in response to the March 18 article, ''More disability case reviews sought.''For advocates such as myself, who experienced the aggressively hostile campaign to terminate low-income disabled persons in the 1980s, a major objective in any initiative to increase the number of reviews is to prevent those governmental abuses from recurring.We readily acknowledge that the review process is a necessary feature of any disability program and that the integrity of the program is affected by the Social Security Administration's failure to perform reviews.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Republicans caught the Social Security Administration in a cross-fire yesterday, criticizing lengthy delays in the handling of disability claims while voicing concern that the agency will hand out too many benefits as it tries to reduce the backlog.In their first examination of the troubled disability program since taking over Congress in January, GOP members of the Social Security subcommittee criticized the Woodlawn agency for failing to review recipients already on the rolls to see if they are still disabled.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | July 10, 1991
The 4-year-old southwest Baltimore boy wears a backpack wherever he goes. The backpack contains a package of special food and a feeding tube, the only way he can eat.The diagnosis is gastroesophageal reflux, complicated by chronic pulmonary disease. Or, as his grandmother says: "He can't keep his food down. And he gets pneumonia."As a result, the boy is developmentally disabled, with some speech and behavior problems. But almost three years ago, when his grandmother requested Social Security Income (SSI)
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A small but growing Social Security Administration effort to encourage recipients of one of its disability programs to go to work is poorly run and subject to abuse, according to congressional investigators.The agency "has done a poor job of implementing and managing" the program, which costs $30 million a year, and has given its staff few criteria and little training for running it, said the General Accounting Office in a report delivered to Congress yesterday.The GAO also said the program lacked clear goals and sufficient information to monitor its effectiveness.
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