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By New York Times News Service | July 27, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Claims by the country's most prominent independent pathologist that police are guilty of a pattern of torturing and killing prisoners have added fuel to African National Congress accusations that security forces are fomenting violence to support white rule.The pathologist, Dr. Jonathan Gluckman, opened his files on more than 200 cases of prisoners who died in police custody and said they showed a police force "totally out of control.""Ninety percent of the people in these files, I am convinced, were killed by the police," he said.
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NEWS
December 22, 2012
Neil Simon's commentary, "Cardin stands for rights" (Dec. 13), correctly depicts U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin's steadfast pursuit to hold accountable violators of human rights in Russia with the killing of attorney Sergei Magnitsky. Our concern is that the U.S. Department of State will find excuses to avoid imposing sanctions or simply not acknowledge or respond to violations in Russia or elsewhere. This they have done often. For example, the British have just released a report admitting their security forces murdered attorney Patrick Finucane in Northern Ireland.
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NEWS
By LOUISE ROUG and LOUISE ROUG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 18, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Intense fighting broke out between security forces and gunmen in a volatile Sunni Arab section of the capital, leaving at least three dead and terrifying residents during a battle that began at night and extended into daylight yesterday. Authorities said about 50 Sunni gunmen fought Iraq's Shiite-dominated security forces for nine hours in the northern neighborhood of Adhamiya, forcing U.S. troops working in support of Iraqi forces to close down streets and entrances to the area.
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo | February 16, 2012
Two recent reports appearing on the same day last week in The New York Times and The Washington Post illustrate U.S. intentions in Iraq. What they reveal is that despite the heralded "end" of U.S. participation in the war there, U.S. policy continues to depend on our security apparatus to influence Iraq, at the expense of Iraqis' sovereignty and dignity. The Times report informed us that the U.S. State Departmentdecided to cut the U.S. embassy staff by 50 percent from its current 16,000 personnel.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 1994
JOHANNESBURG -- After a yearlong inquest into South Africa's most compelling political murder mystery, a judge ruled yesterday that the army and police had killed Matthew Goniwe and three other anti-apartheid campaigners in 1985 as part of a drive to contain civil unrest.But Judge Neville W. Zietsman said he could not conclusively link any of the suspects -- including Gen. Christoffel van der Westhuizen, who rose to become chief of military intelligence -- to the four bodies that were found scorched and mutilated on a prairie outside Port Elizabeth.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI AND SHAMIL AZIZ and BORZOU DARAGAHI AND SHAMIL AZIZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Urban clashes continued for a second day in a volatile Sunni Arab neighborhood of northern Baghdad, leaving at least five Iraqis dead and 20 wounded yesterday in fighting between gunmen and Iraqi security forces. Witnesses described sectarian gunbattles between Shiite-led security forces and Sunni Arab residents. Iraqi officials, however, said outside insurgents had infiltrated the city's Adhamiya quarter and provoked clashes with police and the army that also killed at least three people Monday.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,SUN REPORTER | November 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Tens of thousands of American troops are shifting from combat operations against insurgents to training, advising and supporting Iraqi security forces in what military officials say will require a long-term U.S. military presence in Iraq. Rather than allowing American troops to withdraw to the sidelines, the new campaign will keep them directly in the violent middle ground between Iraq's warring factions, as increasing numbers of soldiers and Marines embed as combat advisers with Iraqi army and paramilitary police units.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 2006
The U.S. military has not properly tracked hundreds of thousands of weapons intended for Iraqi security forces and has failed to provide spare parts, maintenance personnel or even repair manuals for most of the weapons given to the Iraqis, a federal report released yesterday has concluded. The report by the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, a federal oversight agency, found discrepancies in U.S. military records on where thousands of 9 mm pistols and hundreds of assault rifles and other weapons might have ended up. The U.S. military did not even take the elementary step of recording the serial numbers of the weapons that were provided to Iraqis, the inspector general found, making it impossible to track or identify any that might have fallen into the wrong hands.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2004
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Heavily armed assailants detonated a bomb yesterday near a cluster of foreign embassies in Damascus, the Syrian capital, setting off an intense gunbattle with state security forces that maintain exceptionally tight control over the society. Syrian officials said the attack had been carried out by "a terrorist and sabotage group," broadly linking it to recent incidents of violence in other Arab capitals, including deadly bombings in Saudi Arabia and a planned poison gas attack that Jordan said it foiled last week.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Solomon Moore and Peter Wallsten and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
AMMAN, Jordan -- Seeking to recover from a series of diplomatic gaffes, President Bush extolled Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's courage and vowed yesterday to help him secure greater authority over security forces in the struggle to quell violence. But after about two hours of meetings, the leaders announced no new initiatives or specific plans, and Bush returned to Washington and offered no details about how and where such a transfer of authority would occur. Al-Maliki suggested in an ABC News interview after the meetings that U.S. forces could leave by June.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
You have to hand it to Syria's Bashar Assad; the man's got chutzpah. His interview in Damascus last week with ABC's Barbara Walters was either a case study in delusional thinking or unbounded cynicism. Mr. Assad's amazing performance, in which he denied any role in the killing of thousands of demonstrators protesting his rule, was an uninterrupted outpouring of absurd lies, obfuscations and evasions that would have embarrassed even his murderously deceitful father, the late former president Hafez Assad, from whom he inherited his position.
NEWS
By Adil Shamoo | November 28, 2011
The United States continues to ignore the thwarted Arab Spring in Bahrain. Recently, a quasi-military court in the small Gulf state sentenced 20 doctors and nurses to up to 15 years in jail. The charge against them? Treating injured demonstrators opposing the regime. Doctors and nurses in the Middle East have a long and proud tradition of treating the ill, regardless of the situation. In ninth-century Baghdad, for example, Hunayn ibn Ishaq was the Caliph's physician. The Caliph asked this physician to prepare a poison to kill his enemies.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun reporter | October 24, 2011
An Air Force member who was assigned to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland has died in Afghanistan, the Defense Department announced Monday. Airman 1st Class Jerome D. Miller Jr., 23, of Washington, died Oct. 13 in a non-combat-related incident in Parwan province, the Defense Department said. Miller was assigned to the 459th Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base Andrews in Prince George's County.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Over the weekend, Julian Assange, the reclusive renegade computer hacker who has made a career of unveiling government and corporate secrets on the whistle-blower website Wikileaks, confounded American policymakers for the second time in three months when he released nearly 400,000 classified field reports from the war in Iraq. In July, Wikileaks posted 90,000 classified documents describing a litany of strategic setbacks, human rights abuses and widespread corruption in the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2010
While unemployment lines remain long elsewhere, SafeNet Inc. is one Maryland employer that's hiring. The Belcamp cyber security firm has more than 100 job openings for consultants. But so far this year, it has only been able to fill four of those positions. That's because in the white-hot world of cyber security, there's a lot of opportunity but not enough qualified workers to take advantage. As the federal government, contractors who support federal agencies and private companies ramp up spending to secure complex computer networks, they are all competing for a tight pool of high-tech specialists and workers with government security clearances.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | April 12, 2009
LAKEWOOD, Wash. - Capt. Michael Nguyen had a profitable tour of duty in Iraq - so profitable, in fact, that soon after returning to this working-class neighborhood near Fort Lewis, he was parking a Hummer H3T outside his apartment. Then a $70,000 BMW M3 showed up. People notice cars like that on a street filled with pickup trucks, old Chevys and low-end sport utility vehicles. "I spent 10 years in the military, and I can tell you, nobody's giving me bailouts like that," said Mark Smith, who lives across the street.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - Six months after U.S. officials disbanded the 400,000-soldier Iraqi army, there are growing calls to bring back large parts of it to help combat stubborn guerrilla resistance and relieve stretched American forces. "It's something that's very actively under discussion" and could be decided by the end of the month, said a State Department official who requested anonymity. "People are saying, `Let's entertain the idea. How would you do it?'" A senior Pentagon official said the proposal - under review by L. Paul Bremer III, the American civilian administrator for Iraq, and U.S. military officers - would not necessarily include trying to rebuild Iraqi army units but rather integrating sizable groups of former soldiers into the security forces.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld saw firsthand the U.S.-led coalition's strategy of turning over security to Iraqis in a sweep through the nation yesterday, as military officials lauded a precipitous drop in attacks on American troops even as they acknowledged that it was likely the result of poor weather and the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. The Pentagon chief focused much of his visit on briefings and demonstrations of the fledgling Iraqi Civil Defense Corps, one of four security forces set up by the occupying coalition.
NEWS
By Anthony H. Cordesman | March 31, 2009
No one can predict the outcome in Iraq. It certainly is not yet victory in any meaningful sense. There are still serious security threats. U.S. command warns that al-Qaida in Iraq is not yet defeated, and there may still be years of low-level violence before Iraqi forces can eliminate it. Muqtada al-Sadr and the Mahdi militia are down but scarcely out. Sunni-Shiite and Arab-Kurdish tensions can still explode into violence. Iranian influence remains a threat, and so does the threat of Turkish intervention in the north and Syrian tolerance of hostile Sunni infiltration across the Syrian border.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 2, 2008
House whip calls on Big Three CEOs to resign COLUMBIA, S.C. : The chief executives of the nation's Big Three automakers should give up their jobs, not just their lavish executive pay packages, as a condition of $25 billion in proposed federal help to keep the companies operating, U.S. House Majority Whip James E. Clyburn said yesterday. "If I had my way, all three of those guys would be in the unemployment line, and I think that ought to be one of the conditions for us doing this," Clyburn, a Democrat from South Carolina, told reporters at a news conference.
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