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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 14, 1990
AMMAN, Jordan -- Iraq condemned the United Nations Security Council resolution on Israel as "shameful" yesterday, while Egypt joined Britain in rejecting the direct linkage President Saddam Hussein is seeking between the the Persian Gulf crisis and the Arab-Israeli conflict."
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NEWS
By Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi | April 12, 2010
Forty-seven heads of state are now in Washington attending a Nuclear Security Summit, at President Barack Obama's invitation, "to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism." While Iran's nuclear weapons program and support of terrorist groups — it arms, funds and trains Hezbollah, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and, according to recent reports, the Taliban — are not on the agenda, Iran undoubtedly will be on the minds of summit participants and observers.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 1990
NEW YORK -- The Soviet Union's chief negotiator on the Middle East called yesterday for delaying introduction of a United Nations Security Council resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq to allow time for a final negotiating effort that would give President Saddam Hussein a "face-saving" reason to give up Kuwait peacefully.But the official, Yevgeny M. Primakov, who has served as President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's special envoy in the Persian Gulf crisis, said in an interview that if such an initiative failed, not only should a Security Council resolution authorizing force be approved, but military action should also be taken almost immediately against Iraq.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- The U.N. nuclear agency signaled yesterday that it is preparing to cancel technical aid on nearly half its nuclear cooperation projects with Iran, a significant step toward implementing sanctions aimed at halting the nation's uranium enrichment program. In a report to the International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors in Vienna, the agency leadership recommended halting all assistance on projects that could contribute to enrichment and reprocessing work prohibited under the sanctions resolution adopted by the U.N. Security Council in December.
NEWS
By PETER SPIEGEL and PETER SPIEGEL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A senior State Department official said yesterday that he expects Iran to reject a U.N.-backed entreaty to end its nuclear enrichment program and added that the United States will quickly press for international sanctions against Tehran if an Aug. 31 deadline is not met. Undersecretary of State R. Nicholas Burns, the Bush administration's point man on Iran, said the United States has the backing of fellow permanent members of the United Nations...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 1990
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III and other U.S. officials expressed doubt yesterday that the Soviet Union wanted a fresh political initiative in the Persian Gulf before the United Nations authorized a military offensive against President Saddam Hussein of Iraq.Yevgeny M. Primakov, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's special envoy in the gulf, said in an interview Thursday that a new effort to find a political solution, involving a promise of a broader Middle East settlement, should precede any U.N. Security Council resolution approving the use of military force.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
YESTERDAY, FRANCE and Russia promised to block any U.N. Security Council resolution that would open the way to an attack on Iraq. The White House said it would nevertheless push ahead in hopes of securing such a resolution, or at least the backing of a majority of Security Council members, which would be a symbolic victory of sorts. Diplomatic stalemate? Secretary of State Colin L. Powell told Russian television that the United States is ready and willing to fight on its own, or with partners.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- House leaders, smarting from accusations that Congress is vacillating in the Western alliance's accelerating war of nerves with Iraq, have decided to hold a vote on the U.S. Persian Gulf policy by Saturday.House Speaker Thomas S. Foley, D-Wash., said yesterday that the House will meet Thursday to begin formal debate on President Bush's strategy toward Iraq."To say that we don't want to take a position because we want to be on both sides is untrue," Mr. Foley said. "We are going to take a position."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2003
PARIS - A day after the United States and its European allies agreed that Iraq would be rebuilt with significant international cooperation, France, Russia, and Germany sought yesterday to stake out as extensive a role for the United Nations as possible in reconstructing the shattered country. Meeting in Paris, the foreign ministers of the three countries called for the United Nations to be given an immediate role in dealing with an "emergency humanitarian situation" in Iraq. Their remarks underscored the gap that remains in detail over how broad the role should be. Speaking one day after U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell met with the foreign ministers of 23 European countries, the ministers also called for the earliest possible halt to the fighting in Iraq.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | December 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As the first wave of U.S. troops prepared to land in Somalia, Bush administration officials offered conflicting views yesterday on the conditions that would allow them to return home.Their lack of agreement as to when United Nations troops could take over the humanitarian mission underscores the administration's difficulty in defining its goals in Somalia.One senior administration official insisted that disarming Somalis and pointing them toward political reconciliation "are not conditions" for U.S. withdrawal, but rather are "factors that will have to be looked at before the U.N. takes over."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 16, 2006
TOKYO --Questions over the effectiveness of the Security Council's punitive sanctions against North Korea for its claimed nuclear test grew yesterday, as both South Korea and China - the North's two most important trading partners - indicated that business and economic relations would largely be unaffected. A day after the council unanimously passed the resolution after nearly a week of intensive diplomatic negotiations, the South Korean government said it would still pursue economic projects with North Korea, including an industrial zone and tourist resort in the North.
NEWS
By PETER SPIEGEL and PETER SPIEGEL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A senior State Department official said yesterday that he expects Iran to reject a U.N.-backed entreaty to end its nuclear enrichment program and added that the United States will quickly press for international sanctions against Tehran if an Aug. 31 deadline is not met. Undersecretary of State R. Nicholas Burns, the Bush administration's point man on Iran, said the United States has the backing of fellow permanent members of the United Nations...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 2, 2005
LONDON -- The United States accused Syria yesterday of playing a role in Friday's deadly suicide bombing against Israel, as the Bush administration, backed by France, sought to tighten the screws on Damascus on multiple fronts. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said for the first time that the United States had "firm evidence" that a Syrian-based militant group, Palestinian Islamic Jihad, was involved in the Tel Aviv bombing. It killed five Israelis and shattered an Israeli-Palestinian truce.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration is preparing a proposal to lift international sanctions on Iraq in phases, retaining U.N. supervision of Iraq's oil sales for now but transferring other parts of its economy to a new Iraqi authority in coming months, administration officials said yesterday. The officials said that instead of a single Security Council resolution to lift sanctions on Iraq, the United States would seek three or four resolutions over several months, gradually turning over parts of the economy to an Iraqi authority assembled with U.S. guidance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2003
PARIS - A day after the United States and its European allies agreed that Iraq would be rebuilt with significant international cooperation, France, Russia, and Germany sought yesterday to stake out as extensive a role for the United Nations as possible in reconstructing the shattered country. Meeting in Paris, the foreign ministers of the three countries called for the United Nations to be given an immediate role in dealing with an "emergency humanitarian situation" in Iraq. Their remarks underscored the gap that remains in detail over how broad the role should be. Speaking one day after U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell met with the foreign ministers of 23 European countries, the ministers also called for the earliest possible halt to the fighting in Iraq.
NEWS
By Dennis Ross | March 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - If there was any doubt that diplomacy had run its course on Iraq, President Bush's speech to the country has put that to rest. Saddam Hussein has precious little time left to choose exile - and the odds are he will choose wrong once again. Prior to the president's speech, the administration's diplomacy left something to be desired. Though we were unlikely to achieve a second U.N. Security Council resolution - and, given the administration's interpretation of Security Council Resolution 1441, one wasn't necessary - we pursued a second resolution nonetheless.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Syria, Lebanon and Jordan agreed yesterday to resume negotiations with Israel next month, restoring a Middle East peace process that was shattered Feb. 25 by the massacre of Palestinian worshipers in Hebron.In addition, high-level talks between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization have been set to discuss ways to improve security in the Israeli-occupied territories and to restart negotiations on carrying out Palestinian self-rule in Jericho and Gaza, U.S. officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld warned yesterday that the United States might not send its forces to join future peacekeeping missions without a grant of full immunity from the jurisdiction of the new International Criminal Court. Rumsfeld aggressively defended the administration's demand that U.S. troops and government officials be exempt from the court, two days after the United States vetoed a Security Council resolution extending the U.N. peacekeeping mandate in Bosnia.
NEWS
March 6, 2003
YESTERDAY, FRANCE and Russia promised to block any U.N. Security Council resolution that would open the way to an attack on Iraq. The White House said it would nevertheless push ahead in hopes of securing such a resolution, or at least the backing of a majority of Security Council members, which would be a symbolic victory of sorts. Diplomatic stalemate? Secretary of State Colin L. Powell told Russian television that the United States is ready and willing to fight on its own, or with partners.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 14, 2003
MAYPORT NAVAL STATION, Fla. - On the eve of a crucial Security Council debate, President Bush warned the United Nations that it must "show backbone and courage" in confronting Iraq or risk becoming irrelevant. The president delivered his message before thousands of cheering sailors at this sun-drenched Florida naval station. Deployment orders have not arrived here, but some sailors said they expect to be called on to leave their families and head for the Persian Gulf. Facing resistance from key members of the Security Council such as France, Russia, China and Germany, all of which favor giving weapons inspectors more time before settling on war against Iraq, Bush insisted that "America has laid out the facts for the world to see," proving that Saddam Hussein has refused to disarm voluntarily as the United Nations demanded in November.
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