Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSecurity Clearance
IN THE NEWS

Security Clearance

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 2, 2012
KEYW Holding Corp. is making good on an ambitious plan to grow, organically and through acquisitions, into a company that can respond quickly to the needs of its federal defense clients. The Hanover-based company said today it completed the acquisition of Poole & Associates Inc., of Annapolis Junction, for $126 million in cash and stock. The acquisition was announced Sept. 10. It has bought several companies since its founding in 2008, and going public in 2010. The company also is returning to the public market to raise more capital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
The officials who are responsible for safeguarding the nation's intelligence secrets are trying to figure out how to better vet millions of employees and contractors with security clearances, after auditors found that some of those workers owed more than three-quarters of a billion dollars in unpaid taxes. About 83,000 employees and contractors at the Department of Defense owed more than $730 million in unpaid taxes, the Government Accountability Office reported last month. Last year, the agency reported that 8,400 executive-branch civilian employees and contractors owed $85 million.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2002
A Defense Department employee with a high security clearance pleaded not guilty in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to a charge of possession with intent to distribute cocaine. Irwin K. McQueen, 40, of the 7400 block of Digby Road in Gwynn Oak was arrested near the 2500 block of Hollins St. on Jan. 18 as he left a bar at Hollins Street and Franklintown Road, according to police reports. Law enforcement sources close to the investigation, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said McQueen had a high security clearance and was responsible for conducting background checks of potential Defense Department employees.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 12, 2013
Self-proclaimed civil libertarians are up in arms over the National Security Agency's massive database containing information about whom we call and what we do on the Web. Defenders of the program say, "So what?" Unless you're a terrorist, no one in the government will ever bother to access that information. That's not good enough, say civil libertarians. "At least 850,000 people have security clearances that give them access to this information," Tiffiniy Cheng of Fight for the Future recently wrote on The Huffington Post.
NEWS
February 17, 2011
In regard to Marta Mossburg's column in which she claims that "those not qualified to have access to the port are working there on a regular basis" ( "Crime issue raises security concerns at Baltimore's port," Feb. 16), I say baloney. If Ms. Mossburg had performed basic due diligence for her article, she would have found that anyone who works on any public pier or marine terminal in Maryland, any time day or night, must produce a valid federal security clearance card as well as an identification card from the employer.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Walter Bowen Jr. was hoping the early bird would catch the job. The Elkridge resident had arrived at 7 a.m. for a job fair at Fort Meade so he could meet with recruiters before they'd been exhausted by crowds of job-seekers. "I wanted to be one of the first five people in line — get in there when people are fresh," said Bowen, 39, a Navy veteran. More than 1,000 people were expected to attend Wednesday's Technical Job Fair, which was open to the public. Some job hunters came from as far away as California and Chicago, said Jerome Duncan, a business work-force specialist with the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
NEWS
October 22, 2004
WITH THE STICK of the Supreme Court's ruling in June, as well as a little basic logic, a District Court judge has poked holes in the U.S. military's gossamer argument that certain prisoners at Guantanamo Bay don't deserve confidential access to lawyers. Now can we all go back to following the basic rules of law? As U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly pointed out in a decision Wednesday, those held incommunicado for more than two years, with no access to the outside world and unsure of why they are being held, cannot adequately represent themselves in court.
EXPLORE
August 17, 2011
Aunt Susan's Kitchen Academy - Aug. 28, 2-4 p.m. and 4:30-6:30 p.m. at Aunt Susan's Kitchen, 15101 Baltimore Ave. Learn how to cook Cajun shrimp sunken in butternut squash soup, pan-seared tilapia, roast chicken and more. Space is limited; sign up at the restaurant. $40 per person, $75 for couples and $20 off groups of five. Community Job Fair - Sept. 14, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Club Meade, 6600 Mapes Road, Fort Meade. Fair is open to all job seekers (veterans and non-veterans)
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | August 7, 2008
In the months leading up to the 2001 anthrax scare, Bruce E. Ivins had sought help from a psychiatrist, started taking antidepressants and repeatedly told a friend he was frightened by bouts of paranoia and depression. Yet even as his mental condition appeared to be deteriorating, Ivins maintained a government security clearance that gave him access to some of the world's most deadly pathogens. Details about Ivins' mental state in 2000 and 2001 were unsealed yesterday by the Justice Department as federal officials sought to establish his guilt in the anthrax killings.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | July 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration wants to limit mental health questions in federal employee background checks, saying the current system violates the privacy rights of job applicants.The policy, unveiled yesterday by Tipper Gore, the wife of Vice President Gore, would focus psychiatric inquiries solely on an applicant's recent past, eliminate reporting about marriage counseling and other short-term therapy and allow mental health questions only as they relate to job performance."I personally do not believe people who receive mental health treatment, in the broadest general sense, represent any more of a security risk than somebody that receives treatment from a cardiologist or an oncologist or an allergist," Mrs. Gore said in a speech at the National Press Club.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Letter writer David Liddle apparently wishes to persuade us to abandon the Constitution's Fourth Amendment in our quest for an elusive guarantee of security ("Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12). In doing so, however, he rejects a founding principle of our nation - checks on the power of government over individuals. Moreover, he expresses a naive belief that the overarching powers ceded to government will not be abused. Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower responsible for leaking news of the surveillance program's existence, has said that it does not really work the way the government describes.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, Bob Drogin and Katherine Skiba, Tribune Newspapers | June 10, 2013
A British newspaper has identified a 29-year-old former Marylander as the source of the top secret documents that revealed details of two National Security Agency surveillance programs and revived debate of the agency's reach into the private lives of Americans. The Guardian reported Sunday that Edward Snowden, who was working at an NSA office in Hawaii as an employee of the defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, wanted to alert the public to the programs being conducted in their name.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
In Kenneth Lasson's commentary, "Freeing Pollard benefits all" (Feb. 27), who is "all?" Jonathan Pollard passed classified information to Israel to circumvent U.S. policy. Is "all" the thousands of Americans with security clearance who do not betray that confidence, or does it refer to the country Mr. Pollard betrayed? He is serving a life sentence because of a plea bargain. His cooperation was in no way exculpatory. Mr. Lasson writes, "It is now more clear than ever that he is being severely punished for deeds he never did. " Mr. Pollard confessed, and Israel acknowledged his espionage years later.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Fort Meade's rapid growth in the past few years has made it the state's largest employer, but getting a foot in the door — or, rather, inside the guarded fence line — can be daunting. Many of the Army installation's 56,000 jobs require a security clearance. And though it's one base, Fort Meade contains 95 employers, including the National Security Agency and the Environmental Protection Agency. When local officials held an event last week to demystify Fort Meade hiring, 300 people showed up, armed with notebooks and resumes.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 2, 2012
KEYW Holding Corp. is making good on an ambitious plan to grow, organically and through acquisitions, into a company that can respond quickly to the needs of its federal defense clients. The Hanover-based company said today it completed the acquisition of Poole & Associates Inc., of Annapolis Junction, for $126 million in cash and stock. The acquisition was announced Sept. 10. It has bought several companies since its founding in 2008, and going public in 2010. The company also is returning to the public market to raise more capital.
EXPLORE
August 17, 2011
Aunt Susan's Kitchen Academy - Aug. 28, 2-4 p.m. and 4:30-6:30 p.m. at Aunt Susan's Kitchen, 15101 Baltimore Ave. Learn how to cook Cajun shrimp sunken in butternut squash soup, pan-seared tilapia, roast chicken and more. Space is limited; sign up at the restaurant. $40 per person, $75 for couples and $20 off groups of five. Community Job Fair - Sept. 14, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Club Meade, 6600 Mapes Road, Fort Meade. Fair is open to all job seekers (veterans and non-veterans)
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Letter writer David Liddle apparently wishes to persuade us to abandon the Constitution's Fourth Amendment in our quest for an elusive guarantee of security ("Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12). In doing so, however, he rejects a founding principle of our nation - checks on the power of government over individuals. Moreover, he expresses a naive belief that the overarching powers ceded to government will not be abused. Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower responsible for leaking news of the surveillance program's existence, has said that it does not really work the way the government describes.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 25, 2000
JERUSALEM - When the U.S. State Department yanked Martin S. Indyk's security clearance, it also sidelined a key player in the Arab-Israeli peace process, which is already perilously close to failure. A trusted intermediary between President Clinton and Prime Minister Ehud Barak, Indyk, the U.S. ambassador to Israel, is steeped in knowledge of the broad sweep and minute details of the conflict and has a deep understanding of Israel's fractious internal politics. The State Department suspended Indyk's security clearance Thursday amid investigations by the FBI and the department's security service into alleged mishandling of classified materials by the envoy.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
Walter Bowen Jr. was hoping the early bird would catch the job. The Elkridge resident had arrived at 7 a.m. for a job fair at Fort Meade so he could meet with recruiters before they'd been exhausted by crowds of job-seekers. "I wanted to be one of the first five people in line — get in there when people are fresh," said Bowen, 39, a Navy veteran. More than 1,000 people were expected to attend Wednesday's Technical Job Fair, which was open to the public. Some job hunters came from as far away as California and Chicago, said Jerome Duncan, a business work-force specialist with the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
NEWS
February 17, 2011
In regard to Marta Mossburg's column in which she claims that "those not qualified to have access to the port are working there on a regular basis" ( "Crime issue raises security concerns at Baltimore's port," Feb. 16), I say baloney. If Ms. Mossburg had performed basic due diligence for her article, she would have found that anyone who works on any public pier or marine terminal in Maryland, any time day or night, must produce a valid federal security clearance card as well as an identification card from the employer.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.