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Security Breaches

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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 29, 1996
Baltimore police commanders may oust the private security guards who watch over the downtown headquarters because of two security breaches that have left top officials concerned, a department spokesman said yesterday.Discussion on whether to replace Wells Fargo guards will come up during the annual contract review with the security company, said spokesman Sam Ringgold.More than 500 police officers, commanders and civilians work in the Fayette Street building."The two breaches are being taken very seriously," Ringgold said.
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NEWS
September 23, 2014
There's simply no excuse for the Secret Service to have allowed an apparently deranged man to vault over the White House fence on Friday then sprint across the lawn and actually enter the president's residence through an unlocked door before he was tackled and apprehended. Heads should roll for a breach of security of this magnitude at what ought to be one of the country's most heavily guarded facilities. But it shouldn't come at the expense of the public's access to a historic site that symbolizes the nation's tradition of open governance and accountability to the citizens it serves.
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NEWS
February 6, 2009
A few days ago, customers of Baltimore-based Provident Bank received notification that their credit and debit card numbers may have been compromised in a theft described as potentially one of the largest personal data heists ever. The culprit here was a piece of malicious software placed on the computer network of Heartland Payment Systems in Princeton, N.J., which processes 100 million transactions a month. Although officials don't know how many Provident customers or other consumers were victimized, the breach at Heartland is just one wave in a rising tide of data theft that suggests tough new federal controls are needed on how organizations handle the data they collect.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Customers who dined at P.F. Chang's China Bistro at the Inner Harbor during two months this spring may be victims of debit and credit card data theft, the Scottsdale-based chain warned Monday in an announcement of a widespread security breach at 33 U.S. locations. PF. Chang's was alerted to a possible breach on June 10 by the U.S. Secret Service and launched a still-ongoing investigation. The company said it had the problem contained by the next day and has been processing credit and debit cards securely since June 11. Chang's said its card processing system was breached.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
In the two weeks between recent revelations that hackers stole data on students, alumni and faculty from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University, nearly 360,000 records were swiped in similar attacks at schools in Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Dakota. Online thieves have increasingly sought sensitive or otherwise valuable data from educational institutions, experts say. Last year alone, breaches included possible exposure of 2.5 million Social Security and bank account numbers associated with an Arizona community college system, 74,000 Social Security numbers of University of Delaware students and staff, and 145,000 applications to Virginia Tech, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
NEWS
March 4, 2002
Columbia group for businesswomen plans wine-tasting The Columbia Charter Chapter of American Business Women's Association will hold a wine-tasting evening at 6 p.m. March 11 at the Columbia Sheraton, 10207 Wincopin Circle. Wine will be supplied by Boordy Vineyards. Hors d'oeuvres and light desserts will be served. Tickets are $25. Reservations are requested by Thursday. Information: 410-302-4262, or www.abwa-columbia.com. Session teaches protection against security breaches Ellicott City-based Paragon Smart Technologies LLC will offer an executive briefing, "Business Continuity Planning - Preventing and Surviving Disasters and Security Breaches," from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Embassy Suites Hotel Baltimore at BWI Airport, 1300 Concourse Drive, Linthicum Heights.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
A Central Middle School social studies teacher was suspended for 18 months without pay this week -- just days after it was disclosed that students at the school had seen questions remarkably similar to those that would appear on a state writing test.Ronald L. Beckett, associate superintendent for support services, said yesterday that Ann Danoff, a teacher for more than 20 years, was given the long-term suspension Monday. He would not offer a reason."It's a personnel action," Mr. Beckett said.
NEWS
March 28, 2008
The accidental exposure of personal information about patients in a Maryland dental plan should be another sharp reminder to institutions to better protect consumers' privacy. Absent tighter controls, states should consider imposing tough penalties for these breaches. A technical error has been blamed for the posting of the names, addresses, dates of birth and Social Security numbers of 75,000 members on the public Web site of the Dental Network, an HMO owned by CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
I am writing in outrage over this constant revelation of security breaches involving our most private of data ( "UM forms task force to identify any further data vulnerabilities," Feb. 25). I demand that they pass a law limiting any data collection to the bare minimum needed to complete the current business transaction and that all such data be deleted upon final payment or termination of the business activity. The law should go further in that businesses or institutions must notify the person they are collecting data on exactly what it is they are digitizing and obtain written permission to do so. This week it's the University of Maryland, last week it was Yahoo (who, by the way, never notified me about anything)
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
The deadly shooting at one of the region's largest military facilities Monday reopened the debate about whether officials have done enough to secure the nation's massive portfolio of domestic bases. At least 13 people were killed and several more were wounded, authorities said, when a 34-year-old Texas man and former Navy reservist allegedly opened fire from inside the Washington Navy Yard in one of the most violent such incidents ever on a U.S. military installation. National security analysts say the Pentagon has improved security at its posts following the 2001 terrorist attacks and, more recently, the 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
In the two weeks between recent revelations that hackers stole data on students, alumni and faculty from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University, nearly 360,000 records were swiped in similar attacks at schools in Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Dakota. Online thieves have increasingly sought sensitive or otherwise valuable data from educational institutions, experts say. Last year alone, breaches included possible exposure of 2.5 million Social Security and bank account numbers associated with an Arizona community college system, 74,000 Social Security numbers of University of Delaware students and staff, and 145,000 applications to Virginia Tech, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
I am writing in outrage over this constant revelation of security breaches involving our most private of data ( "UM forms task force to identify any further data vulnerabilities," Feb. 25). I demand that they pass a law limiting any data collection to the bare minimum needed to complete the current business transaction and that all such data be deleted upon final payment or termination of the business activity. The law should go further in that businesses or institutions must notify the person they are collecting data on exactly what it is they are digitizing and obtain written permission to do so. This week it's the University of Maryland, last week it was Yahoo (who, by the way, never notified me about anything)
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
The deadly shooting at one of the region's largest military facilities Monday reopened the debate about whether officials have done enough to secure the nation's massive portfolio of domestic bases. At least 13 people were killed and several more were wounded, authorities said, when a 34-year-old Texas man and former Navy reservist allegedly opened fire from inside the Washington Navy Yard in one of the most violent such incidents ever on a U.S. military installation. National security analysts say the Pentagon has improved security at its posts following the 2001 terrorist attacks and, more recently, the 2009 shootings at Fort Hood, Texas.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Even among the hundreds of data breaches that occur each year, the hacking of card processor Global Payments stands out. The Atlanta-based company, which processes credit and debit card transactions for Visa and MasterCard, recently revealed that hackers gained access to no more than 1.5 million card numbers. Visa and MasterCard quickly announced that the accounts are being monitored and cardholders won't be liable for any fraudulent charges. But the Global Payments breach is another reminder that despite all of our attempts to keep personal information out of the hands of thieves — shredding documents and frequently changing passwords — we still are vulnerable.
NEWS
February 6, 2009
A few days ago, customers of Baltimore-based Provident Bank received notification that their credit and debit card numbers may have been compromised in a theft described as potentially one of the largest personal data heists ever. The culprit here was a piece of malicious software placed on the computer network of Heartland Payment Systems in Princeton, N.J., which processes 100 million transactions a month. Although officials don't know how many Provident customers or other consumers were victimized, the breach at Heartland is just one wave in a rising tide of data theft that suggests tough new federal controls are needed on how organizations handle the data they collect.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
A security breach at a major credit card payment processor has prompted more than two dozen banks nationwide - including Baltimore-based Provident Bank - to notify customers that their credit and debit card numbers might have been compromised. Provident sent new cards to customers last week with a letter stating that it has "been advised of a very large data breach impacting millions of credit and debit card numbers." Only those customers who received letters and replacement cards sent last week were affected, said Dana Jung, Provident's manager of business continuity and customer information security.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Even among the hundreds of data breaches that occur each year, the hacking of card processor Global Payments stands out. The Atlanta-based company, which processes credit and debit card transactions for Visa and MasterCard, recently revealed that hackers gained access to no more than 1.5 million card numbers. Visa and MasterCard quickly announced that the accounts are being monitored and cardholders won't be liable for any fraudulent charges. But the Global Payments breach is another reminder that despite all of our attempts to keep personal information out of the hands of thieves — shredding documents and frequently changing passwords — we still are vulnerable.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | April 3, 1995
At least one person has been disciplined for giving advance notice to some Central Middle School students of the essay questions that would appear on a state-required writing test.Associate Superintendent Kenneth Lawson would not say Friday what disciplinary action had been taken or who had been disciplined. He did say, however, that no students were involved in breaching the security of the test material, though some apparently got a look at it after the breach occurred.News of the incident reached parents Thursday, although school officials have been investigating the problem since Jan. 10, the first day of the two-day state testing period.
NEWS
March 28, 2008
The accidental exposure of personal information about patients in a Maryland dental plan should be another sharp reminder to institutions to better protect consumers' privacy. Absent tighter controls, states should consider imposing tough penalties for these breaches. A technical error has been blamed for the posting of the names, addresses, dates of birth and Social Security numbers of 75,000 members on the public Web site of the Dental Network, an HMO owned by CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield.
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