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January 12, 1999
Orlandus Wilson, 81, whose bass voice was the foundation of the Golden Gate Quartet's gospel harmonies, died Dec. 30 in Paris, where he lived.The Golden Gate Quartet had a huge influence on American sacred and secular music. Performing in clubs and concert halls as well as churches, and backing up blues singers such as Leadbelly and Josh White, the quartet demonstrated that gospel had all the vitality of secular music. Its driving versions of spirituals were a model of vocal harmony for groups from the Dixie Hummingbirds to the Spaniels.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 31, 2007
In this week's column, I'm talking about "grown folks' music," new and reissued albums by mature artists whose musical gifts have largely been underrated. One is a legendary super freak whose music had mellowed nicely before he died; there's a silken-voiced crooner returning to R&B after a decade of singing for Christ; and a forgotten soul sista whose sound mingled the best of Diana Ross and Aretha Franklin. Rick James, Deeper Still --At the time of his death in 2004, James had resurfaced in pop culture as a punch line on the Dave Chappelle Show.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 2004
Vastly different countries and cultures often can't play well together, but vastly different musical styles can be amazingly accommodating and welcoming. Cross-pollination of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic idioms goes on all the time, from folk music forays by Brahms and Dvorak to jazzy explorations by Copland and Bernstein, not to mention stabs at musical classicism by the likes of Billy Joel and Elvis Costello. A gradual breakdown in the once-formidable divides between Western and Eastern styles has been particularly fruitful over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
It doesn't take much to get Al Green - the Rev. Al Green, that is - up on his pulpit. Especially when the subject is love. The most acclaimed soul singer since Ray Charles has seen love, experienced it and sung about it from many perspectives: as an R&B sex symbol in the 1970s, as a reborn gospel singer and preacher in the '80s and '90s, and lately as a man who has struck a balance between the secular and the spiritual. When Green decided last year to reunite with his longtime songwriting partner and producer Willie Mitchell - with whom he created some of the most enticing, sensual soul records ever in Let's Stay Together, Tired of Being Alone and You Ought to Be With Me - his first stop was his mother's house.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 11, 2000
"It's the same message, different time." That's how Martin Wilson, a member of the Baltimore-based Choir Boyz, describes the essence of gospel music today. The ensemble will be delivering that message along with Grammy-winner Yolanda Adams in a "Gospel Extravaganza" this evening at the Baltimore Convention Center, presented by the Visionary Marketing Group in conjunction with the NAACP National Convention. Adams and the Choir Boyz are among a host of artists who have been redefining gospel music, helping to make it speak in compelling ways to new listeners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 31, 2007
In this week's column, I'm talking about "grown folks' music," new and reissued albums by mature artists whose musical gifts have largely been underrated. One is a legendary super freak whose music had mellowed nicely before he died; there's a silken-voiced crooner returning to R&B after a decade of singing for Christ; and a forgotten soul sista whose sound mingled the best of Diana Ross and Aretha Franklin. Rick James, Deeper Still --At the time of his death in 2004, James had resurfaced in pop culture as a punch line on the Dave Chappelle Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2005
It doesn't take much to get Al Green - the Rev. Al Green, that is - up on his pulpit. Especially when the subject is love. The most acclaimed soul singer since Ray Charles has seen love, experienced it and sung about it from many perspectives: as an R&B sex symbol in the 1970s, as a reborn gospel singer and preacher in the '80s and '90s, and lately as a man who has struck a balance between the secular and the spiritual. When Green decided last year to reunite with his longtime songwriting partner and producer Willie Mitchell - with whom he created some of the most enticing, sensual soul records ever in Let's Stay Together, Tired of Being Alone and You Ought to Be With Me - his first stop was his mother's house.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | July 22, 1992
The Choirboys of Passy-Buzvenal, a 90-voice French choir founded in 1987, will perform a program with ancient liturgical music at 5:30 p.m. Sunday at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5300 N. Charles St. Directed by Jean-Michel Angelloz, the choir will also sing at the regular 11 o'clock liturgy that morning.The Choir of St. Mary's Church, Warwick, England, a choir of 30 boys and 16 men, will present a concert at 7:30 p.m. July 29 at Old St. Paul's Church, Charles and Saratoga streets. Under the direction of Simon Lole, the choir will perform a program of sacred and secular music.
NEWS
July 7, 2000
Concert to mark 25 years for Singers Madrigale A reunion concert at St. Martin's Evangelical Lutheran Church at 7:30 p.m. July 15 will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the a capella Singers Madrigale of Annapolis. Joining the 15 singers will be about 10 former members reuniting for the occasion. The performance will include sacred and secular music, and Christmas songs celebrating "Christmas in July." The singers have performed in venues including the Maryland Renaissance Festival and the National Cathedral in Washington.
NEWS
June 17, 1997
THE WORD "broadcasting" connotes serving the widest possible audience. Since the 1920s that is what AM radio was all about. A good example is Baltimore's WBAL, a 50,000-watt clear-channel powerhouse. audible from New England to Bermuda. For decades, it combined news and information with middle-of-the-road music, sports and some talk shows.WBAL-AM has not had a music format for nearly two decades. One by one, other AM stations, too, have junked their music formats and have started programming for narrowly targeted audiences.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 2004
Vastly different countries and cultures often can't play well together, but vastly different musical styles can be amazingly accommodating and welcoming. Cross-pollination of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic idioms goes on all the time, from folk music forays by Brahms and Dvorak to jazzy explorations by Copland and Bernstein, not to mention stabs at musical classicism by the likes of Billy Joel and Elvis Costello. A gradual breakdown in the once-formidable divides between Western and Eastern styles has been particularly fruitful over the years.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 11, 2000
"It's the same message, different time." That's how Martin Wilson, a member of the Baltimore-based Choir Boyz, describes the essence of gospel music today. The ensemble will be delivering that message along with Grammy-winner Yolanda Adams in a "Gospel Extravaganza" this evening at the Baltimore Convention Center, presented by the Visionary Marketing Group in conjunction with the NAACP National Convention. Adams and the Choir Boyz are among a host of artists who have been redefining gospel music, helping to make it speak in compelling ways to new listeners.
NEWS
January 12, 1999
Orlandus Wilson, 81, whose bass voice was the foundation of the Golden Gate Quartet's gospel harmonies, died Dec. 30 in Paris, where he lived.The Golden Gate Quartet had a huge influence on American sacred and secular music. Performing in clubs and concert halls as well as churches, and backing up blues singers such as Leadbelly and Josh White, the quartet demonstrated that gospel had all the vitality of secular music. Its driving versions of spirituals were a model of vocal harmony for groups from the Dixie Hummingbirds to the Spaniels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | February 19, 1998
Chartres Cathedral was once filled with music: the haunting beauty of Gregorian chant and the echoes of early troubadours. Lecturer Malcolm Miller, an English specialist on the great church, will bring some of that music with him when he speaks about Chartres on Sunday at Second Presbyterian Church.Miller, a medieval historian, has been a guide at the cathedral for many years and is an expert in its architecture, which spans the Romanesque and the Gothic styles, and its unmatched deep-blue stained glass.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 15, 2007
DETROIT -- It's been a while - 13 years to be exact - since the Clark Sisters, the biggest-selling female gospel group of all time, put out an album together, though it doesn't feel as if they've been away. Their new album, Live - One Last Time, was released last week, but in the time that their voices were absent as a group, their influence and dominance on gospel and R&B music remained as strong as it was when they released their groundbreaking 1981 single, "You Brought the Sunshine."
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