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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2004
JOS, Nigeria - President Olusegun Obasanjo declared a state of emergency in the central state of Plateau yesterday, suspending its elected officials and putting a retired general in charge of a region racked for months by sectarian violence. In an announcement on state radio and television, Obasanjo accused Plateau officials of having "wittingly and unwittingly encouraged acts that have subverted peace and tranquillity." The president suspended the state governor, his deputy and the state assembly.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014
Ravens running back Ray Rice was recently suspended indefinitely from the National Football League for his savage beating of his wife. If the NFL is serious about addressing violence - domestic and otherwise - they need to adopt a system that detects those players likely to be violent and connect them with treatment that can effectively reduce aggression. The same type of public health approach used by Cure Violence to address neighborhood violence can be used to address violence among NFL players.
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NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The sectarian violence engulfing Iraq will only grow worse if the U.S. abandons its current military strategy and begins to withdraw its forces, the top American war commander said yesterday. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, speaking at a Pentagon news conference, said he was trying to steer clear of the "political minefields" of Washington and avoided any direct comment on the showdown between Congress and the White House over Iraq. But he said that limited improvements resulting from President Bush's new war strategy would be eroded by troop withdrawals.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
JOS, Nigeria - Charred bodies with scorched hands reaching skyward lay in the streets and a mosque with blackened minarets smoldered Wednesday after several days of fighting between Christians and Muslims killed more than 200 people. Sectarian violence in this central region of Nigeria has left thousands dead over the past decade, and the latest outbreak that began Sunday came despite the government's efforts to quell religious extremism in the West African country. - Sun news services
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The main Sunni Arab political bloc is close to returning to suspended talks over the formation of a new government, the lead Sunni negotiator said yesterday. The step could help defuse the sectarian tensions that threatened to spiral into open civil war last week after the bombing of a Shiite shrine and the reprisal killings that followed. That bloodletting has amounted to the worst sectarian violence since the American invasion nearly three years ago, and the threat of Iraqis killing each other on an even greater scale appears to have helped drive Sunni Arab politicians back to moderation, after they angrily withdrew from negotiations last Thursday.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 2007
Baghdad -- A brigade of 3,700 U.S. troops arrived in Baghdad this week, part of the Bush administration's troop buildup aimed at quelling sectarian violence. The soldiers from the 4th Brigade, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team from Fort Lewis, Wash., are part of a troop buildup ordered by President Bush in January that is expected to amount to 28,500 combat and support personnel. The last combat brigade of 3,700 troops is due by late this month.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 5, 2007
BAGHDAD -- An Iraqi judge has ruled that there is enough evidence to try two former Shiite Health Ministry officials in the killing and kidnapping of hundreds of Sunnis, many of them snatched from hospitals by militias, according to American officials who are advising the Iraqi judicial system. The case, which was referred last week to a three-man tribunal in Baghdad, is the first time that an Iraqi magistrate has recommended that such high-ranking Shiites be tried for sectarian violence.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 2, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The recent upsurge in violence continued to exact a heavy toll on Iraqi civilians yesterday, while members of the national parliament said they moved a step closer to voting on a controversial new law to equitably distribute oil revenue. Police yesterday reported the deaths of dozens of people in sectarian violence across Iraq, including the massacre of 16 people attending a funeral in Khalis near Baghdad.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI AND JULIAN E. BARNES and BORZOU DARAGAHI AND JULIAN E. BARNES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 25, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. military officials announced yesterday that they had stepped up a campaign against "death squads" operating in the capital, launching 19 raids as sectarian violence between Sunnis and Shiites left dozens dead and wounded throughout Iraq. In the western Iraqi province of Anbar, two U.S. soldiers died in combat and the mayor of the provincial capital was assassinated. Inside the heavily protected Green Zone, Saddam Hussein's half-brother presented his final defense in a trial over the fate of nearly 150 Shiite villagers who were killed by the former regime.
NEWS
January 21, 2010
JOS, Nigeria - Charred bodies with scorched hands reaching skyward lay in the streets and a mosque with blackened minarets smoldered Wednesday after several days of fighting between Christians and Muslims killed more than 200 people. Sectarian violence in this central region of Nigeria has left thousands dead over the past decade, and the latest outbreak that began Sunday came despite the government's efforts to quell religious extremism in the West African country. - Sun news services
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons | November 30, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Lawmakers from several Iraqi parties boycotted a parliamentary session yesterday, essentially derailing efforts by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to get approval for nominees to fill two vacant Cabinet posts. At least 196 legislators signed their names as present at the parliament, but almost 100 of them failed to show up for the session when they learned that voting for new ministers of justice and communications would occur, according to those in attendance. Without a simple majority of its 275 members present, the parliament could not hold the vote.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Raheem Salman and Ann M. Simmons and Raheem Salman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Changes that would ease restrictions on former members of Saddam Hussein's Baath Party rejoining Iraq's civil service and military appeared headed for legislative gridlock after attempts to read a draft bill in parliament disintegrated yesterday into yelling and finger-pointing. It was the first time that Iraqi lawmakers had taken up any of the so-called major benchmarks that Washington has deemed crucial for the long-term cessation of sectarian violence and national reconciliation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 5, 2007
BAGHDAD -- An Iraqi judge has ruled that there is enough evidence to try two former Shiite Health Ministry officials in the killing and kidnapping of hundreds of Sunnis, many of them snatched from hospitals by militias, according to American officials who are advising the Iraqi judicial system. The case, which was referred last week to a three-man tribunal in Baghdad, is the first time that an Iraqi magistrate has recommended that such high-ranking Shiites be tried for sectarian violence.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | September 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A new White House report yesterday found "satisfactory" progress on nine of 18 benchmark measures in Iraq, an assessment that drew renewed attacks from Democratic critics of President Bush's policy. Despite their call for a different course in Iraq, however, Democrats have not agreed on an alternative that would bring troops home faster than Bush has ordered. The latest White House evaluation gave passing grades to the Iraqis for integrating members of Saddam Hussein's Baath Party into the government and moving toward semi-autonomous regions and other areas.
NEWS
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Molly Hennessy-Fiske,Los Angeles Times | August 5, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. and Iraqi forces announced yesterday that they had killed the mastermind of attacks on Samarra's famed Golden Mosque, which sparked sectarian violence across the country. Haytham Badri, who also used the last name Sabi, was killed Thursday when his car caught fire as he fled a U.S. air assault on his home, Iraqi police said. He had been hiding with a group of armed men in the Banat Hassan area of eastern Samarra, about 65 miles north of the capital. Badri's cousin, who spoke on condition that he not be further identified, said in an interview that the dead man's father and brother identified his body.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2007
Baghdad -- Two suicide car bombers ripped through the throngs that poured into Baghdad streets carrying the national flag aloft in a rare moment of shared joy after the national soccer team's surprise run to the Asian Cup final. Police said at least 50 people were killed and 135 were injured in the blasts. Celebratory gunfire after Iraq defeated South Korea, 4-3, on penalties in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, killed at least one more person and injured 17, police said. The savagery of the attacks shocked even Baghdad's battle-hardened residents.
NEWS
January 12, 2007
President Bush only has one opportunity to fix the mess that has become Iraq. Mr. Bush's plan to increase troops there, outlined in a national address Wednesday night, is the right strategy, but we worry it may not have enough firepower. Iraq's unstable condition has demanded more troops for some time, and the Bush administration now admits that sectarian violence is out of control. The mission is to add about 21,500 U.S. soldiers and Marines to the 160,000 troops already in Iraq - mostly for action in Baghdad and the Anbar province where al-Qaida is active.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
FOR WHATEVER reason, insurgents spared Iraq's new government a round of mortar fire to accompany its swearing-in Tuesday. Such violent expressions of protest have disrupted other functions held in the U.S.-guarded Green Zone. But this time, Iraqi insurgents were busy elsewhere, causing mayhem and upping Iraqi casualties in this war of attrition. And yesterday, a suicide bomber in the Kurdish city of Irbil added 50 more names to the list of the dead. The installation of the first elected Iraqi government since the fall of Saddam Hussein should be reason to celebrate.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Raheem Salman and Julian E. Barnes and Raheem Salman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Seven U.S. troops were killed yesterday in three roadside bomb attacks, the military announced. The deaths came as Iraq's Parliament agreed to cut its summer holiday in half, and some observers said a deal had been reached on a law to share the country's oil wealth. Both legislative developments were signs that the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki was creeping toward meeting White House demands to show political progress and stem sectarian violence that continues to claim Iraqi and U.S. lives.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 2007
Baghdad -- A brigade of 3,700 U.S. troops arrived in Baghdad this week, part of the Bush administration's troop buildup aimed at quelling sectarian violence. The soldiers from the 4th Brigade, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team from Fort Lewis, Wash., are part of a troop buildup ordered by President Bush in January that is expected to amount to 28,500 combat and support personnel. The last combat brigade of 3,700 troops is due by late this month.
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