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NEWS
February 23, 1998
Abraham A. Ribicoff,87, a former U.S. senator and governor of Connecticut who served as secretary of health, education and welfare in the Kennedy administration, died yesterday at a New York City nursing home.Mr. Ribicoff, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, began his career as a state legislator in the Connecticut General Assembly and went on to serve as a judge, a congressman, governor of Connecticut, a member of Kennedy's Cabinet, a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations and a U.S. senator.
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NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Thomas H. Maugh II and Tracy Wilkinson and Thomas H. Maugh II,Tribune Newspapers | April 26, 2009
MEXICO CITY - International officials declared the swine flu outbreak in Mexico and the U.S. a "public health emergency" Saturday as new cases were reported north and south of the border and fears grew of a global epidemic. The Mexican government indicated Saturday that the outbreak was more severe than originally acknowledged, announcing that more than 1,300 people are believed to have been infected. The virus, which the top official of the World Health Organization said had "pandemic potential," is now suspected in the deaths of 81 people here, Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova said.
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NEWS
August 18, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has written the U.S. secretary of health and human services to urge approval of a blood test that detects two strains of the AIDS virus.The test, which is under review by federal officials, would detect HIV-1, which causes most AIDS infections in this country, and HIV-2, which is rare.Health officials say there are only 31 known cases of HIV-2 in the United States. Most of those who carry the virus are believed to have contracted it in West Africa.Four cases of HIV-2 were detected through anonymous testing in Montgomery County this month.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2007
The Maryland General Assembly will consider a $500 million health care proposal to extend medical coverage to more than 100,000 uninsured residents during the special session called by Gov. Martin O'Malley to tackle the state's fiscal problems. The proposal, in a session that begins Monday, resurrects ideas from a bill that passed the House of Delegates last year but died in the state Senate. President Thomas V. Mike Miller, who opposed expanding social programs in the face of a looming budget shortfall, projected to be $1.7 billion in the next fiscal year, now says he would support a health care bill if it didn't add to the deficit.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Mindful of lessons learned in the last four years, President Clinton and his aides are developing incremental proposals to fill gaps in health insurance coverage, administration officials said.The proposals, to help provide coverage for some of the nation's 10 million uninsured children and to help pay premiums for workers who are between jobs, look more feasible now because medical costs are coming under control.Donna E. Shalala, secretary of health and human services, said last week that the administration would try to expand coverage step by step, rather than by proposing a grand scheme to redesign the health care system.
NEWS
April 29, 1991
The good news is, the Bush administration has recognized that something should be done urgently to provide health insurance for the 34 million Americans, mostly the working poor, who have no insurance coverage. The bad news is, the administration's proposal won't get to first base in resolving that problem.Secretary of Health Louis Sullivan proposes in effect to levy an income tax on health-care benefits provided to workers for so-called "Cadillac-type coverage." Any benefit valued above, let us say, $1,200 a year would be taxed as if it were income.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 20, 1998
A government advisory group has voted to give a clean bill of health to the artificial sweetener saccharin, which, despite its pink-packeted presence on restaurant tables everywhere, has been classified since 1981 as a suspected cause of cancer.The group, the executive committee of the National Toxicology Program, voted 6-3 Wednesday to recommend that saccharin be removed from the government's list of suspected carcinogens, said a scientist who attended its meeting and who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
NEWS
April 27, 1998
IN A LAST-MINUTE decision to maintain a 9-year-old ban on federal funding of needle exchange programs, President Clinton embarrassed the Cabinet secretary preparing to announce a change, sided with his drug adviser against his AIDS advisers, and gave in to congressional opponents of the program.In the diplomacy of narcotics, Mr. Clinton's surrender made some sense, a gesture in behalf of curtailing demand.In terms of public health, it was flat wrong. Needle exchange programs in Baltimore and elsewhere have proved their worth.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Both houses of Congress have rejected President Bush's proposal to finance a campaign against infant mortality in 10 localities by diverting money from other health programs that serve pregnant women and poor children.Instead, Congress last week appropriated $25 million for the infant mortality campaign in the current fiscal year.The lawmakers did not specify where the money would come from, but they explicitly prohibited Bush from taking it from community health centers or from the Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, as the administration had planned.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Thomas H. Maugh II and Tracy Wilkinson and Thomas H. Maugh II,Tribune Newspapers | April 26, 2009
MEXICO CITY - International officials declared the swine flu outbreak in Mexico and the U.S. a "public health emergency" Saturday as new cases were reported north and south of the border and fears grew of a global epidemic. The Mexican government indicated Saturday that the outbreak was more severe than originally acknowledged, announcing that more than 1,300 people are believed to have been infected. The virus, which the top official of the World Health Organization said had "pandemic potential," is now suspected in the deaths of 81 people here, Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 20, 1998
A government advisory group has voted to give a clean bill of health to the artificial sweetener saccharin, which, despite its pink-packeted presence on restaurant tables everywhere, has been classified since 1981 as a suspected cause of cancer.The group, the executive committee of the National Toxicology Program, voted 6-3 Wednesday to recommend that saccharin be removed from the government's list of suspected carcinogens, said a scientist who attended its meeting and who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
NEWS
April 27, 1998
IN A LAST-MINUTE decision to maintain a 9-year-old ban on federal funding of needle exchange programs, President Clinton embarrassed the Cabinet secretary preparing to announce a change, sided with his drug adviser against his AIDS advisers, and gave in to congressional opponents of the program.In the diplomacy of narcotics, Mr. Clinton's surrender made some sense, a gesture in behalf of curtailing demand.In terms of public health, it was flat wrong. Needle exchange programs in Baltimore and elsewhere have proved their worth.
NEWS
February 23, 1998
Abraham A. Ribicoff,87, a former U.S. senator and governor of Connecticut who served as secretary of health, education and welfare in the Kennedy administration, died yesterday at a New York City nursing home.Mr. Ribicoff, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, began his career as a state legislator in the Connecticut General Assembly and went on to serve as a judge, a congressman, governor of Connecticut, a member of Kennedy's Cabinet, a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations and a U.S. senator.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Karen Hosler and Carl M. Cannon and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Yesterday's deal between cigarette makers and the attorneys general of 40 states must now be approved by two other mutually suspicious institutions -- the White House and Congress. And early signs are that ratification in either venue is hardly a foregone certainty."Congress cannot and will not be bound to ratify a privately negotiated resolution of this -- or any other -- sensitive matter," House Speaker Newt Gingrich said in a statement."This is the yardstick by which I will personally measure the merit of this proposal: If it helps kids with health care, I would be inclined to support it. If it simply makes trial lawyers richer, I would be inclined to oppose it."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Mindful of lessons learned in the last four years, President Clinton and his aides are developing incremental proposals to fill gaps in health insurance coverage, administration officials said.The proposals, to help provide coverage for some of the nation's 10 million uninsured children and to help pay premiums for workers who are between jobs, look more feasible now because medical costs are coming under control.Donna E. Shalala, secretary of health and human services, said last week that the administration would try to expand coverage step by step, rather than by proposing a grand scheme to redesign the health care system.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 17, 1994
U.S. adults may be more aware of the need to exercise and count calories than they once were, but more of them than ever are overweight.The number of overweight adults, which had remained stable at about a fourth of the adult population from 1960 through 1980, suddenly jumped to a third of all adults between 1980 and 1991, according to a recent study by the National Center for Health Statistics in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.For...
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has begun his drive to reform the nation's health care system in earnest, appointing his wife as the head of a national health care task force slated to submit its recommendations to Congress in 100 days.The appointment of Hillary Rodham Clinton, 45, as chairwoman of the President's Task Force on National Health Reform grants her the most prominent policy-making position a president's wife has ever held. She will not receive a salary for her work.The move also promises her the role of overseeing one of her husband's most challenging campaign pledges, trimming burgeoning health care costs while also providing health care for the United States' roughly 36 million uninsured citizens.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | July 29, 1991
THE "PRO-FAMILY" Bush administration has taken another disastrous step toward the denouement of Ronald Reagan's favorite fairy tale -- that the days when Father-Knew-Best can be dusted off and polished up for the '90s.The latest episode, "Sullivan the hatchet man," finds the secretary of health and human services, Louis Sullivan, under the lights on the conservative Coalition for America's satellite television network -- professing shock that a federal grant had been issued to fund a nationwide survey of teen-age sexuality.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has begun his drive to reform the nation's health care system in earnest, appointing his wife as the head of a national health care task force slated to submit its recommendations to Congress in 100 days.The appointment of Hillary Rodham Clinton, 45, as chairwoman of the President's Task Force on National Health Reform grants her the most prominent policy-making position a president's wife has ever held. She will not receive a salary for her work.The move also promises her the role of overseeing one of her husband's most challenging campaign pledges, trimming burgeoning health care costs while also providing health care for the United States' roughly 36 million uninsured citizens.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has written the U.S. secretary of health and human services to urge approval of a blood test that detects two strains of the AIDS virus.The test, which is under review by federal officials, would detect HIV-1, which causes most AIDS infections in this country, and HIV-2, which is rare.Health officials say there are only 31 known cases of HIV-2 in the United States. Most of those who carry the virus are believed to have contracted it in West Africa.Four cases of HIV-2 were detected through anonymous testing in Montgomery County this month.
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