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By Dave Rosenthal | February 17, 2012
The new Disney presentation, "The Secret World of Arrietty," an animated feature from Studio Ghibli, promises to give new life to a classic children's book series that dates back to the early 1950s. The movie is adapted from Mary Norton's "The Borrowers," the first book in a series about a group of little people who live under the floorboards of a house and borrow things need for their survival. Among them is teeny Arrietty Clock. She and the others ingeniously repurpose household items -- matchboxes are used for storage, postage stamps as paintings -- and try to go unnoticed.
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By Dave Rosenthal | February 17, 2012
The new Disney presentation, "The Secret World of Arrietty," an animated feature from Studio Ghibli, promises to give new life to a classic children's book series that dates back to the early 1950s. The movie is adapted from Mary Norton's "The Borrowers," the first book in a series about a group of little people who live under the floorboards of a house and borrow things need for their survival. Among them is teeny Arrietty Clock. She and the others ingeniously repurpose household items -- matchboxes are used for storage, postage stamps as paintings -- and try to go unnoticed.
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NEWS
By John le Carre | May 5, 1993
IN the secret world, when I duly entered it, the law was the ghost at every clandestine feast.For how can you flout the law without first knowing what it is? You might as well try to commit adultery without the benefit of marriage.The very life blood of America's intelligence community has been drawn from the legal profession. Its heartland is in Boston, at Yale, in the pretty white mansions scattered up and down the coast.Historically, it was the American lawyers turned spies -- the good old boys of the East Coast legal Establishment -- who pushed and pulled the borders of American constitutional legality and sometimes just damn well kicked them down, for the purpose of defending it against the forces of darkness.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
Only in hindsight did it strike anyone as odd: Carrie John never seemed to invite friends and neighbors into her Ridgely's Delight rowhouse. Instead, she would meet friends out, or people would watch from the corner to make sure she got in after a night at the bar. "None of us ever went inside," said a friend, Julie Della-Maria. The reason might have been the "huge gardens" of marijuana and assorted pills that police found on the day John, a 29-year-old drug abuse researcher, died after injecting what she thought was a narcotic.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Guest stars continue to populate popular series, and money expert Louis Rukeyser turns his attention to America's education system.* "VR.5" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Actually, in this intriguing series' season finale, Sydney (Lori Singer) reaches VR.8, the deepest level of virtual reality she has plumbed to date, where she learns some family truths. But will she be able to come back out? Louise Fletcher makes a guest appearance as Sydney's mother. Fox.* "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | March 30, 1994
Mary Gordon has written about the family from the time of her critically acclaimed first novel, "Final Payments," in 1978.That book was about the tortured relationship between a young woman and her ill father. In a steady stream of novels, novellas and short stories produced since, she has written about several other family relationships, from a variety of perspectives.And now she's writing "Reading My Father," a nonfiction work about her father, who died when Ms. Gordon was 7. Delving into her own family, she is finding, is more difficult than she had imagined.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
William Langewiesche entered Lower Manhattan's Ground Zero within a week of the terrorist attack last September. Over the next eight months, the Atlantic Monthly staff writer was granted total access to the site and to the tireless workers who recovered bodies and removed 2 million tons of debris. On Thursday, the symbolic end of the recovery effort will be marked when an honor guard places an empty stretcher into an ambulance and a final steel beam is carried away. For Langewiesche, full immersion into the "culture" of Ground Zero yielded a surprising perspective on the American spirit - and on the contrast between those inside and outside the site's perimeter wall.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
She was relieved, now that it was over, to have made good on a promise to a persistent 9-year-old relative to speak at his school in Baltimore. It went so well, that as she left the Park School yesterday, path-breaking children's author Judy Blume wished aloud that she could speak to kids at a public school, too. In fact she wished she could talk to kids more often. On the other hand, it's a mystery to her why anybody thinks that writers who hide themselves away to get their ideas on paper could possibly feel comfortable standing before hundreds of kids.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
Only in hindsight did it strike anyone as odd: Carrie John never seemed to invite friends and neighbors into her Ridgely's Delight rowhouse. Instead, she would meet friends out, or people would watch from the corner to make sure she got in after a night at the bar. "None of us ever went inside," said a friend, Julie Della-Maria. The reason might have been the "huge gardens" of marijuana and assorted pills that police found on the day John, a 29-year-old drug abuse researcher, died after injecting what she thought was a narcotic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 24, 2000
"James Bond: The Secret World of 007," by Alastair Dougall, illustrations by Roger Stewart (DK Publishing, 144 pages, $19.95). Whether you take Ian Fleming's James Bond books and the 19 movies that have been based on them as high spoof or gripping thrillers, this painstaking compilation will not disappoint. Intricately designed, with hundreds of film stills and technical drawings, it's a celebration of the form and the legend. Anyone who's been swept up in an 007 fantasy will find nourishment and inspiration here.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
She was relieved, now that it was over, to have made good on a promise to a persistent 9-year-old relative to speak at his school in Baltimore. It went so well, that as she left the Park School yesterday, path-breaking children's author Judy Blume wished aloud that she could speak to kids at a public school, too. In fact she wished she could talk to kids more often. On the other hand, it's a mystery to her why anybody thinks that writers who hide themselves away to get their ideas on paper could possibly feel comfortable standing before hundreds of kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
William Langewiesche entered Lower Manhattan's Ground Zero within a week of the terrorist attack last September. Over the next eight months, the Atlantic Monthly staff writer was granted total access to the site and to the tireless workers who recovered bodies and removed 2 million tons of debris. On Thursday, the symbolic end of the recovery effort will be marked when an honor guard places an empty stretcher into an ambulance and a final steel beam is carried away. For Langewiesche, full immersion into the "culture" of Ground Zero yielded a surprising perspective on the American spirit - and on the contrast between those inside and outside the site's perimeter wall.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Guest stars continue to populate popular series, and money expert Louis Rukeyser turns his attention to America's education system.* "VR.5" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Actually, in this intriguing series' season finale, Sydney (Lori Singer) reaches VR.8, the deepest level of virtual reality she has plumbed to date, where she learns some family truths. But will she be able to come back out? Louise Fletcher makes a guest appearance as Sydney's mother. Fox.* "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | March 30, 1994
Mary Gordon has written about the family from the time of her critically acclaimed first novel, "Final Payments," in 1978.That book was about the tortured relationship between a young woman and her ill father. In a steady stream of novels, novellas and short stories produced since, she has written about several other family relationships, from a variety of perspectives.And now she's writing "Reading My Father," a nonfiction work about her father, who died when Ms. Gordon was 7. Delving into her own family, she is finding, is more difficult than she had imagined.
NEWS
By John le Carre | May 5, 1993
IN the secret world, when I duly entered it, the law was the ghost at every clandestine feast.For how can you flout the law without first knowing what it is? You might as well try to commit adultery without the benefit of marriage.The very life blood of America's intelligence community has been drawn from the legal profession. Its heartland is in Boston, at Yale, in the pretty white mansions scattered up and down the coast.Historically, it was the American lawyers turned spies -- the good old boys of the East Coast legal Establishment -- who pushed and pulled the borders of American constitutional legality and sometimes just damn well kicked them down, for the purpose of defending it against the forces of darkness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 16, 1994
NATURAL BORN KILLERSOriginal Soundtrack (Nothing/Interscope 92460)Pop-oriented soundtracks generally tend to work more like albums than like movies. There's no sense of narrative, no real continuity -- just songs, songs, songs. Maybe that's why the soundtrack album for "Natural Born Killers" seems such a revelation. As edited and assembled by Trent Reznor, the dark genius behind Nine Inch Nails, the album mixes music and movie sound bites so seamlessly that listening to it is almost like spending time in the local cineplex.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
In the framed photograph displayed in A. W. Richard Sipe's dining room, Pope John Paul II shakes hands with Mr. Sipe and leans toward him to speak."I tell people he's saying, 'Keep up the good work,' " Mr. Sipe says, laughing.This is not likely. Not since 1990, when the ex-priest from Lutherville published his book on celibacy and the sexual activity of Catholic clergymen in the United States. Not since he started saying the church faces an "epic crisis" due to child abuse by priests, challenging the power structure of the church and the tradition of celibacy as the roots of the problem.
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