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By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 26, 1994
JERICHO, Palestinian Autonomous Zone -- In an old public works building, Palestinian men sit in the stifling heat wearing revolvers, white shirts and ties -- the latter a sure sign they are not locals. They give each visitor a hard, probing look.This is the new West Bank headquarters of the Palestinian secret police, whose quick appearance on the scene rings -- for some -- an ominous note among the celebrations over Israeli withdrawal."They are aiming at people like me. There is no question," said Riyad Malki, an engineering professor identified with a group opposed to Yasser Arafat's Fatah faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | July 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- They met at a gathering of exiles in 1898, two revolutionary-minded activists with a penchant for talking politics and literature. He was attracted by her ideas, her morality, her kind but serious eyes. Felix Dzerzhinsky fell deeply in love. The man who would later direct the first Soviet secret police and orchestrate the purges of the Red Terror is famously known as "Iron Felix," a name befitting his blind devotion to the Bolshevik cause and his utter ruthlessness in eliminating enemies, real or perceived.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 28, 1992
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- High-ranking police officials trained by the FBI and armed by a U.S. marshal formed a secret unit that may have committed political murders in an effort to destroy the Puerto Rican independence movement in the 1980s, government investigators here say.Calling itself the "Defenders of Democracy," the group "was designed to kill and persecute people for their political beliefs," said Sen. Marco Antonio Rigau, chairman of the Puerto Rican...
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | April 3, 2007
BERLIN -- On a glorious, sunny day in Germany's reunited capital, I found myself in the dimness of the Stasi museum - a two-story concrete building that exhibits the tools that East Germany's secret police used to spy on its citizens. I came to this museum because I was impelled by the German movie The Lives of Others, which just won the Oscar for best foreign film. It offers a chilling and emotionally powerful portrait of Stasi surveillance of a fictional writer and artist couple. Directed by a young West German named Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, the movie is drawing huge crowds here, even though it's been 17 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | November 27, 1991
BERLIN -- The then-East German Stasi secret police helped Libya organize the 1988 bombing of a jumbo jet over the Scottish town of Lockerbie, a well-placed Stasi officer says.But it is not believed that the nation's leaders knew anything of this activity.The officer and experts in the field also believe that the Stasi -- East Germany's secret police and intelligence service, which has since been disbanded -- made the attack and other acts of terrorism possible through years of organizational help, training and logistics for Libyan agents.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ela Kasprzycka and Jeffrey Fleishman and Ela Kasprzycka,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2007
WARSAW, Poland -- A national drama that embarrassed the Roman Catholic Church and roused Cold War memories ended in a spectacle yesterday when the new archbishop of Warsaw resigned before his Inauguration Mass after admitting that he collaborated with Communist secret police decades ago. The Vatican quickly accepted the resignation of the Most Rev. Stanislaw Wielgus, who waited until hours before the ceremony in St. John's Cathedral before capitulating to...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 15, 1995
BERLIN -- When a television station announced recently that it would broadcast a special program that evening featuring Lutz Bertram, high ratings were all but guaranteed.The station, ORB, is one of the principal news sources in eastern Germany, and the acid-tongued Mr. Bertram is its most popular moderator.But instead of being treated to one of his biting interviews with the famous, fans were stunned by a rambling confession in which he acknowledged having been an informer for the East German secret police in the 1980s.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | June 27, 1992
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Startling testimony linked a secret South African police unit yesterday to the brutal massacre that has plunged the country into its latest crisis, further eroding the contention that there is no official involvement in township violence.A security guard at a coal mine where the police unit was housed secretly until this week said he was told that the unit went to Boipatong on the night of the June 17 massacre that left 40 people dead. He said armed men from the unit often leftthe mine facility at night in minivans and returned the following morning.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | July 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- They met at a gathering of exiles in 1898, two revolutionary-minded activists with a penchant for talking politics and literature. He was attracted by her ideas, her morality, her kind but serious eyes. Felix Dzerzhinsky fell deeply in love. The man who would later direct the first Soviet secret police and orchestrate the purges of the Red Terror is famously known as "Iron Felix," a name befitting his blind devotion to the Bolshevik cause and his utter ruthlessness in eliminating enemies, real or perceived.
NEWS
August 16, 2000
GOOD NEWS from Poland: Lech Walesa, the steel worker who valiantly led an overthrow of Communist tyranny and went on to become a not-very-successful president -- was never a secret police informer. The supposed proof incriminating him was fraudulent. One of the true heroes and Nobel Peace Prize laureate in 1983, Mr. Walesa had to prove to a court's satisfaction that, in order to run for president again, his denial of having been an informer was truthful. The case against him was voluminous.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ela Kasprzycka and Jeffrey Fleishman and Ela Kasprzycka,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2007
WARSAW, Poland -- A national drama that embarrassed the Roman Catholic Church and roused Cold War memories ended in a spectacle yesterday when the new archbishop of Warsaw resigned before his Inauguration Mass after admitting that he collaborated with Communist secret police decades ago. The Vatican quickly accepted the resignation of the Most Rev. Stanislaw Wielgus, who waited until hours before the ceremony in St. John's Cathedral before capitulating to...
NEWS
By John Rodden and Michael D. Kerlin | December 27, 2006
The death this month of Augusto Pinochet, the former Chilean dictator whose secret police killed and tortured thousands of dissidents, helped seal 2006 as the most fateful year for war criminals and other human rights violators since the Nuremberg trials of 1946. But, at the same time, the docket of human-rights crimes is growing larger and more ill-defined than ever. Just as the nature of human rights violations is evolving, so must the international community's response. The International Criminal Court at The Hague will need extra resources to handle all of its cases and adjudicate the messier ones.
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By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Special to the Sun | December 19, 2004
Stalin and His Hangmen: The Tyrant and Those Who Killed for Him By Donald Rayfield. Random House. 576 pages. $29.95. Working and living in Russia for eight years, I found myself asking one question again and again. I never got a satisfying answer. Watching as they suffered, patiently and endlessly, reporting as their government robbed them, falsely imprisoned them and sometimes even killed them, I wanted to know why Russians rarely fought back. Why weren't they storming the Kremlin, demanding jobs, justice and decent government?
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 30, 2003
MOSCOW - The Kremlin's criminal investigation of a Russian oil company and its chief executive has touched off a shake-up among advisers to President Vladimir V. Putin and may mark the victory of former secret police officials over a moderate faction within Putin's administration. The charges against executives of Yukos Oil Co. seemed to take on greater importance when the Russian press and London's Financial Times reported that Putin's chief of staff, Aleksandr Voloshin, one of the last holdovers from the era of President Boris N. Yeltsin, had submitted his resignation in protest.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2003
Prosecutors played in court yesterday a tape of a police-staged confrontation in which the mother of an elementary school girl accused former Carroll County schools Superintendent William H. Hyde of raping her daughter last summer. "Look at me and tell me that!" the woman demanded after one of Hyde's many denials that he had abused the young girl or caused the genital injuries documented by her doctors. "You're just looking away! Because you did it!" The 50-minute conversation - recorded in August last year by police investigators who gave the woman a tiny recorder to wear under her shirt and coached her on how to confront Hyde - was among the evidence offered yesterday in the second day of testimony in Hyde's trial in Carroll County Circuit Court.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 31, 2003
LONDON - Maybe autumn's tabloid feeding frenzy about butler sex in the Royal Palace is to blame for the blase reaction to the latest news concerning the Royal Family. Maybe it is that, after revelations that Princess Diana had been wooing a man by wearing only her birthday suit under a fur coat, secret rendezvous of the 1930s seems relatively mild. Whatever the case, Britain has reacted with a collective yawn to new information about the royal crisis of the 1930s, when King Edward VIII abdicated in the name of love, for Wallis Warfield Simpson of Baltimore, who, the news is, had enough love inside her that she also shared it with a used-car salesman, among others.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 1998
MOSCOW -- For years now, Russia has been trying to leave the past alone, as if it were some ferocious creature best left undisturbed.But that's changing. With the country battered by economic and political tribulations, some of the resulting fears and frustrations are being channeled into a struggle over Russian history and who will control it. It's a struggle over symbols, but not over nuances. The differences between the two sides couldn't be starker.Wednesday, a parliament dominated by Communists overwhelmingly voted to restore the statue of the founder of the Soviet secret police to its pedestal in the heart of Moscow.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 27, 2000
So whom would you trust with the world's use of nitrogen, Gore or Bush? Cathy Freeman for prime minister! Milosevic doesn't need to be president. As long as he controls the military, secret police and smuggling rackets, the rest is window dressing. Maryland has the blue crab blues. The coup in Peru is too good to be true.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 30, 2002
MOSCOW - In 1991, in an age intoxicated with newly won freedoms, enthusiastic crowds toppled the towering statue of Felix Dzerzhinsky, the ruthless founder of the Soviet secret police, from its pedestal in front of the KGB headquarters on Lubyanka Square. But now, the 15-ton metal monument is the subject of a struggle between increasingly ardent admirers. Russia's new leaders, anticipating next year's parliamentary elections, are wrangling over who can best honor and protect the statue and thereby profit from Russians' increasingly fond memories of their Soviet past.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2002
MOSCOW - At a time when Russia has pledged to aid the global fight against terrorism, Moscow's mayor seems eager to pay homage to a man for whom state-supported terror was a much-loved tool. Mayor Yuri Luzhkov, one of Russia's most influential politicians, has reversed his previous opposition and now says he wants to restore the bronze statue of Felix E. Dzerzhinsky, the founder and first director of the Soviet secret police, to its former place of honor in Lubyanka Square. It had been unceremoniously dislodged after the unsuccessful coup of 1991, to the cheers of a gleeful crowd.
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