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Secret Garden

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By Judith Green | February 19, 1998
"The Secret Garden" is one of the loveliest books ever written for children, and Oakland Ballet has made a ballet of it that's just as beautiful. The California company will bring its full-length production to the Gordon Center in Owings Mills this weekend.Frances Hodgson Burnett's novel, written in 1911, tells the story of Mary Lennox, a selfish, spoiled girl who is orphaned by a cholera epidemic that kills her parents in India. She is sent to live with a reclusive uncle whose vast estate is on the windy, stormy moors of Yorkshire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
The second annual Charm City Farm & Garden tour is scheduled for July 28. The tour will take participants, by bus or by bike, to community-managed green spaces. Both tours will end at the Vollmer Center at Cylburn Arboretum for a party open to tour guests and urban gardeners featuring local music, food, lawn games and more. Awards will be presented to exceptional gardens and farms throughout Baltimore. Also, a produce-judging contest will present awards for remarkable fruits, vegetables and flowers.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 17, 1994
Although the streets remain coated with remnants of last week's snow and ice storms, a beautiful garden is in bloom at the Lyric Opera House.The national touring production of Marsha Norman and Lucy Simon's "The Secret Garden" is easily the most lavish, polished show that's come to the Lyric under the aegis of Baltimore's relatively new presenter, Performing Arts Productions.Perhaps the best way to describe this magical musical, which is based on Frances Hodgson Burnett's 1911 children's novel, is to use the title of one of its songs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2012
When she was growing up, Ellen Potter was an avid reader, and nothing thrilled her more than settling down with her well-worn copy of Frances Hodgson Burnett's classic 1911 children's novel, "The Secret Garden. " The book's heroine, 10-year-old Mary Lennox, loses her parents to a cholera outbreak and must start her life anew at a remote manor in rural England. There she meets an array of often-spooky characters, happens on an abandoned garden and brings it back to life. "At the start of that story, Mary's so sour and unlikable.
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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
Call it the secret garden.It's a magnificent walled oasis hidden in the middle of Towson's business district. Huge magnolia trees shade a 60-foot-by-14-foot pool. Boxwood hedges frame a flagstone terrace. The topiary leads to an office styled like a French chateau. And dormant azaleas await next spring.That is, if they're still there. The property -- created by an eccentric millionaire and open to the public just one day a year -- is for sale."I'm afraid somebody will come in and bulldoze it," said Joan Spurrier, who was secretary to its owner, Thomas Garland Tinsley, for 15 years.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 29, 1992
No doubt about it -- the secret to "The Secret Garden" has been found.The most striking aspect of the production currently at the Kennedy Center is the weeding, pruning and rearranging done by the musical's creators since the show's 1991 Broadway opening.Back then, although "The Secret Garden" was distinguished by composer Lucy Simon's lush score and designer Heidi Landesman's equally lush Victorian Valentine-style sets, the story line was confusing. Now, however, it is no exaggeration to say that, thanks to the further attention of librettist Marsha Norman and director Susan H. Schulman, everything about "The Secret Garden" is blooming.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 15, 1994
In the classic children's novel "The Secret Garden," a curious orphan girl discovers a hidden garden that proves the key to family secrets.Tony-winning producer Heidi Landesman found the story surprisingly relevant to modern audiences and built from it a Broadway musical, whose touring production opens in Baltimore tonight.Although the original story was aimed at children, Ms. Landesman says "The Secret Garden" speaks to adults, too, more than a half-century after Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote the novel.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1996
THE LAST production of the 1996 season for Western Maryland College's Theatre on the Hill opened to audiences Aug. 2.According to Don Schumaker, public information officer for the college, "Ira Domser, producer, has told me that people have actually stopped him on the street to say that this is one of the finest productions Theatre on the Hill has ever done. It's that good.""The Secret Garden" will be presented again Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.The story line for "The Secret Garden" is one we all know and love.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | February 18, 1994
If "The Secret Garden" is to bloom, Jeff Halpern must carefully tend to its score.Mr. Halpern, music director and conductor for the touring Broadway musical version of the classic children's novel, running at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday, is as enthusiastic as any backyard gardener in describing the musical influences planted in the score.He cites influences ranging from turn-of-the-century French classical music to English and American folk tunes of the same period. And because it was composed by Lucy Simon -- sister of pop singer Carly Simon -- it's not surprising this eclectic score also has contemporary-sounding moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
"The Secret Garden"Starring Kate Maberly, Heydon Prowse, Andrew Knott andMaggie SmithDirected by Agnieszka HollandReleased by Warner Bros./American ZoetropeRated G*** 1/2 Bringing classic children's literature to the screen poses pitfalls -- especially when a highly regarded film version has come before and the work has also been turned into a successful Broadway play.Addressing too many expectations leads too often to fatal tinkering in the quest for something fresh.So celebrate "The Secret Garden," a rich, new film version of the 1911 book by Frances Hodgson Burnett.
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By Mike Giuliano | June 21, 2011
Like "The Secret Garden" that gives this 1991 Broadway musical its title, the production at Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre takes a while to blossom. It has its share of vocal highlights and always remains enjoyable, but the story's powerful emotions are fitfully conveyed before finally coming across with full force at the end. The reason partly lies in the musical itself. Based on the beloved 1911 children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, the story concerns a 10-year-old girl, Mary Lennox, who is orphaned when her parents suddenly die in India.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
Tucked between rows of crumbling, empty homes in East Baltimore, kale, collard greens and parsley grow in tidy rows, the leaves still deep-green in December. A few blocks away, a cluster of tree stumps bearing handmade chess boards draws elementary school children to what was once an abandoned lot. Pocket parks and community gardens such as these are nestled in plots across the city, nurtured by residents who devote their free time to transforming trash-strewn lots — owned by the city or absentee landlords — into neighborhood oases.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,Special to The Sun | October 22, 2006
Every year, Bill Doepkens steps out of his clodhoppers and into his artist's smock to surprise his friends and neighbors with a floral wonder: his one-of-a-kind chrysanthemum mural. Composed of all 85 varieties of mums raised on his family's Davidsonville farm, what he calls his "field art" is spread across a third of an acre. Over the past decade, his creations have included a hummingbird, a rooster, a horse and a swan. The 11th annual incarnation is among his most personal. Similar to one he designed to honor his father in 2000, the mural of 2,500 flowers features a big golden heart with a lavender cross in the center.
NEWS
By KRISTI FUNDERBURK and KRISTI FUNDERBURK,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
With peppermint sticks and lemons, azaleas and a secret garden, the annual Towson Gardens Day marks the greening and blossoming of Towson. But the festival, scheduled today, is also about a different kind of green: money. The dollars raised by the event are put back into the community to beautify Towson. In some cases, the effort is as simple as planting trees near large intersections or outside prominent businesses. Where the money goes depends on who asks for it. "Each year, new projects are submitted to us by way of members of the committee or neighborhood associations," event publicist Sandra Brittain said.
NEWS
April 23, 2006
THURSDAY TOWSON GARDENS DAY Browse flowers, plants and crafts from 100 exhibitors and vendors at Towson Gardens Day, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Towson Court-house Fountain Plaza, West Pennsylvania and Baltimore avenues, Towson. There will also be guided tours of the courthouse gardens and self-guided tours of Towson's "Secret Garden" ($1), live music, food and more. Free admission. Rain date Friday. 410-357-0714. FRIDAY THROUGH APRIL 30 SUGARLOAF FESTIVAL This year's festival features works by more than 350 craft designers and fine artists, as well as craft demonstrations, children's events, food and more, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, Saturday and April 30 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium.
NEWS
April 6, 2006
Police identify victim in mobile home fire Baltimore County police identified the man who died in an Essex mobile home fire Tuesday afternoon as Robert Hamilton, 55, of the first block of Dovetail Lane. Hamilton's mother, Ruth Hamilton, 75, and his brother, Steven Hamilton, 51, both of the same address, also were home when the fire started about 3 p.m., fire officials said. They were taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center with injuries that were not considered life-threatening, officials said.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 11, 1991
New York-- Right now, it's about even: the British, 4, the Americans, 4.The British are responsible for four big musicals, ''Cats,'' ''Les Miserables,'' ''Miss Saigon'' and ''Phantom of the Opera.'' The Americans have ''City of Angels,'' ''Grand Hotel,'' ''The Secret Garden'' and ''The Will Rogers Follies.'' We can't count '' Gypsy.'' It's a revival.''Miss Saigon'' deserves all the hype it has gotten. It is spectacular entertainment. Its chief distraction may be the fact that it is a downer, which is no surprise.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Three hundred and sixty-four days of the year, the lavish gated garden on Baltimore Avenue in Towson belongs to Robert M. Evans. Whenever he wants, Evans, whose publishing office opens onto the garden, can sit on the spacious flagstone terrace, watch for signs of cardinals and otherwise soak in his verdant oasis in the middle of an ordinary business district. The private garden is his in the winter, when the slightest shimmer of ice coats magnolia branches, in the spring, when pale pink weeping cherry petals waft into the reflecting pool, and in the summer and fall, when pots of vinca and geranium framing the ornate wrought iron-topped gazebo overflow with color.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2005
Karolyn Seidl took the day off work yesterday and borrowed a wagon from a couple of kids in the neighborhood. She pronounced her daughter, Elaine, the official "lugger," and the two headed to Towson, where pots and baskets of herbs and plants lined the streets. A jazz band played on the courthouse steps, and jewelry sparkled in the sun. Workers in business suits sipped fruit smoothies in plastic goblets. And, for a day, a town normally bustling with bail hearings and board meetings stopped to smell the flowers.
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