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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2000
The grim circumstances might not recur for years, if ever, but County Council members are already trying to reach agreement on how to fill vacancies if a colleague unexpectedly leaves office or dies. Councilwoman Shirley Murphy said she is working on a "comprehensive" bill that would address criticism heaped on the council for using a secret ballot to fill a council vacancy last month. Cathleen M. Vitale was chosen to succeed Cliff Roop, who suffered a fatal heart attack during the Jan. 3 council meeting.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The state attorney general's office is appealing a federal judge's ruling ordering Maryland to use an absentee ballot-marking technology for the disabled that the Board of Elections had refused to certify as secure. The state will ask the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., to throw out District Judge Richard D. Bennett's decision this month. Bennett found that the election board's refusal to implement the program violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. The attorney general's office filed a notice of intent to appeal Monday but did not spell out its objections to the ruling.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 4, 1992
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin's foes in the Russian Congress won a tactical maneuver yesterday that was promptly punctuated by a fistfight.Afterward, legislators pro and con came streaming out of the big Kremlin hall, their faces lighted up with delight. They buzzed like hornets and posed like heroes for the mobs of reporters who came --ing from every direction.It had been a fight between democrats and hard-liners, between little guys and big guys, between age and youth.Three days of unrelieved bitterness, name-calling and vituperation finally erupted into a major-league rhubarb.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Members of a longshoremen's union at odds with port of Baltimore employers will vote next week on whether to accept the employers' "best and final" contract offer. The contract has been on the table for weeks, and union members have disagreed over whether to sign it. The secret ballot vote, scheduled for Feb. 11, has the potential to end an extended stalemate between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents employers.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
It wasn't how she hoped to get there, but Republican Cathleen M. Vitale of Severna Park became the newest member of the Anne Arundel County Council last night, succeeding the late Cliff Roop as the 5th District representative. The council chose Vitale over 11 other candidates to serve the final three years of Roop's term. Roop died of a heart attack during the Jan. 3 council meeting. Vitale finished second to him in the 1998 primary election. "I'm pleased and excited and the work starts now," said Vitale, a lawyer who chairs the county Republican Central Committee.
NEWS
By Jennifer M. Sims and Jennifer M. Sims,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
A U.S. District Court judge ruled yesterday that a Towson man's vote be counted as an absentee ballot after Baltimore County election officials refused to let him vote using a Braille template in Tuesday's election. William Poole, blind since age 9, filed a petition in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, asking that he be allowed to vote using the template, which he designed, so that he could cast a secret ballot. "I thought it would just be declined, and I would have fought the good fight," Poole said.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
No Labels is a non-partisan group of concerned citizens from left, right, and center. The "No Budget, No Pay" concept is a central tenet ("Missed opportunity," Jan 25). Congress is required to produce a budget. All we are asking is that they take no pay until they do their job each and every year. Another idea is to seat members of Congress without regard to party affiliation rather than have Democrats across the aisle from Republicans. This will encourage discussion and compromise.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1994
The message went out directly last Feb. 16 to members of Hagerstown Moose Lodge 212, whose reported angst over the application of a black man had prompted the arrival of three officials from Moose International: No applicant should be rejected because of race, the members were told.Later in the meeting the group took its vote: Of the 15 applicants, 14 were voted on as a slate, approved with raised hands. The black man, James Yates, was rejected separately in a secret paper ballot.An account of the meeting, described as hostile and openly racist, was disclosed in a discrimination suit Mr. Yates has filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore seeking at least $1 million in damages.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
The International Ladies Garment Workers Union refused to participate in Thursday's election for representation of the Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. Joppa warehouse workers.The company said that 314 employees are eligible to vote, but theunion has challenged that number through the National Labor Relations Board, saying that the figure is closer to 275.The NLRB in Washington will rule on the validity of Thursday's election.More than 800 people work for Merry-Go-Round at the Joppa location, but none is represented by a union.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In January 1971 Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia defeated Sen. Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts for majority whip of the Senate, 31 to 24. In the press and political community it ranked as a major upset. Kennedy had held the job for several years; Byrd was a nationally obscure figure.So the next morning, Kennedy was asked what happened. He didn't know, he replied, shaking his head. He had solid commitments from more than 30 of his colleagues but the secret ballot produced only 24 votes.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
The Baltimore Democratic Central Committee met Friday evening, February 15 at the Oliver Community Center to choose a successor to the late Del. Hattie Harrison. I attended to support one of the nine candidates and also to see if what one legislator told me about a year ago was to come true. The legislator told me that Nina Harper was going to be the successor to Hattie Harrison. During the evening the legislator let it be known that if she said this, she meant it to be an explanation of the process of succession.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
No Labels is a non-partisan group of concerned citizens from left, right, and center. The "No Budget, No Pay" concept is a central tenet ("Missed opportunity," Jan 25). Congress is required to produce a budget. All we are asking is that they take no pay until they do their job each and every year. Another idea is to seat members of Congress without regard to party affiliation rather than have Democrats across the aisle from Republicans. This will encourage discussion and compromise.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Shiite political leaders postponed a decision yesterday on who would be Iraq's new prime minister, saying they would take a vote today if efforts to pick a candidate by consensus had not succeeded by then. The main Shiite alliance, which won the largest bloc of seats in the December elections, had expected to nominate Adel Abdul Mahdi yesterday, spokesmen said. Mahdi, a moderate Islamist who belongs to the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, the alliance's largest party, is well liked by Sunni Arab and Kurdish leaders expected to take part in a national unity government.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2004
As the Senate considers passage tonight of legislation that would require the state's new electronic voting machines to produce paper records of cast ballots, bill opponents warn that a paper trail could jeopardize the validity of future elections and violate the secrecy of ballots cast by blind voters. Those who support the bill say that upgrading the state's 16,000 touch-screen voting machines to print paper receipts would boost public confidence in the system, which experts hired by the state found is susceptible to vote-switching.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
A Towson man who has raised concerns about voting procedures for the blind since 1996 sued Baltimore County and state election officials yesterday, alleging that blind voters in the county have been systematically denied the right to a secret ballot. The complaint, brought by William C. Poole Jr. and four other county residents with assistance from the American Civil Liberties Union, said election officials should implement immediately touch-screen voting machines that would allow visually impaired voters to cast a ballot without having to rely on poll workers for assistance.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
A Towson man who has raised concerns about voting procedures for the blind since 1996 sued Baltimore County and state election officials yesterday, alleging that blind voters in the county have been systematically denied the right to a secret ballot. The complaint, brought by William C. Poole Jr. and four other county residents with assistance from the American Civil Liberties Union, said election officials should implement immediately touch-screen voting machines that would allow visually impaired voters to cast a ballot without having to rely on poll workers for assistance.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
The Baltimore Democratic Central Committee met Friday evening, February 15 at the Oliver Community Center to choose a successor to the late Del. Hattie Harrison. I attended to support one of the nine candidates and also to see if what one legislator told me about a year ago was to come true. The legislator told me that Nina Harper was going to be the successor to Hattie Harrison. During the evening the legislator let it be known that if she said this, she meant it to be an explanation of the process of succession.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Members of a longshoremen's union at odds with port of Baltimore employers will vote next week on whether to accept the employers' "best and final" contract offer. The contract has been on the table for weeks, and union members have disagreed over whether to sign it. The secret ballot vote, scheduled for Feb. 11, has the potential to end an extended stalemate between the International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 and the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore, which represents employers.
NEWS
By Jennifer M. Sims and Jennifer M. Sims,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
A U.S. District Court judge ruled yesterday that a Towson man's vote be counted as an absentee ballot after Baltimore County election officials refused to let him vote using a Braille template in Tuesday's election. William Poole, blind since age 9, filed a petition in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon, asking that he be allowed to vote using the template, which he designed, so that he could cast a secret ballot. "I thought it would just be declined, and I would have fought the good fight," Poole said.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2000
The Rouse Co. apparently was mulling over at least one counteroffer for annexation of the Key property yesterday after negotiating with four members of the Columbia Council. Participants declined to say exactly what went on during a 2 1/2 -hour closed morning meeting at Columbia Association headquarters except to note that the matter had not been resolved. Rouse apparently has not budged from its stance that it will not pay for all of the recreational amenities at the company's future North Laurel development.
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