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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 13, 1996
At a point in "The Secret Agent," a mildly retarded young man laboriously draws a picture of what he sees. What he sees is: circles within circles within circles.Obviously, he'd been looking at the plot, not the people."The Secret Agent" is set at the turn of the century, but it feels like it just came out of John le Carre's word processor yesterday, not Joseph Conrad's fountain pen in 1907; it has all the high tropes of the existential espionage novel except a Wall. That includes nihilist terrorists, cynical cops, supercilious controllers, betrayed wives, a politician desperate to cover his own rear and, the point of connection between them all, a little spy, more acted upon than acting, yet never quite so innocent as he pretends to be.This poor fellow is one Verloc (Bob Hoskins)
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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Dan Bongino launched his first campaign for office on a laptop computer in his dining room. His wife, alone at his side, was the only other person he was sure would vote for him. Two years later, as the Severna Park man runs for the House of Representatives in Maryland's 6th Congressional District, he has taken on something of a celebrity status. Now, when he knocks on voters' doors, he's often recognized from his appearances on Fox News or national talk radio programs. Bongino faces a daunting task in attempting to unseat Rep. John Delaney, the deep-pocketed incumbent, in a district that was redrawn in 2011 to favor Democrat s . But no matter how next year's midterm election turns out, even Bongino's adversaries acknowledge he has quickly built a powerful political brand in the state that has given him a voice in Republican politics.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
Despite an unusual public repudiation by the CIA, Daniel Shykind clings to the belief that he is a secret agent, making him mentally incompetent to stand trial on fraud charges, a Montgomery County Circuit judge ruled yesterday. Judge S. Michael Pincus agreed with defense experts who said Shykind will not help his lawyers because he thinks it entails giving away government secrets. "His factual understandings are distorted," Pincus said. "In other words, he can't tell his counsel the truth.
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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin has made another foray into Maryland politics, endorsing GOP candidate Dan Bongino in what she calls his "uphill battle" for the Senate, his campaign announced Monday. In 2010, the former Alaska governor backed Republican Brian Murphy in his unsuccessful GOP primary bid against former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Bongino, a retired Secret Service agent, is challenging first-term Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin. "Dan has seen what politicians have done to our country, and he's decided, 'If I'm not part of the solution, I'm part of the problem,'" Palin said in a statement released by the Bongino campaign.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 16, 1995
Here's a holiday gift for the theatergoer who thinks he's seen everything: a James Bond Christmas play."Double 'O' Xmas (or I Was a Reindeer for the CIA)" is the unwieldy title of the Bond spoof produced by the Impossible Industrial Action theater company at the Theatre Project.Is it naughty or nice?Without intending to confuse Santa, it's a little of both. The play had its origin in two separate shows -- hence the combo title -- written by Don Arab in 1984 for a midnight comedy series at Towson State University.
FEATURES
January 17, 2006
Critic's Pick-- A secret agent (Vin Diesel, above) finds himself guardian/nanny to five kids of a threatened scientist in The Pacifier (9 p.m.-10:30 p.m., Starz).
FEATURES
September 4, 2006
Jennifer Aniston, 37, is about to sign an endorsement deal with Nike, which will pay her the largest sum the company's ever paid to a celebrity, Adrants .com reports. The global ad blitz also may include a spot during the Super Bowl in February. Aniston, reportedly, has vowed to donate a large chunk of the Nike money to cancer charities. Meanwhile, the sportswear goliath, which has been embroiled in controversies stemming from charges it uses sweatshops, has a design deal with rapper Eminem, who is designing an autographed line of Air Max training shoes, with proceeds from the sales going to charities in Michigan.
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2002
SUN SCORE ** Jackie Chan fans won't find much to cheer in his latest, The Tuxedo. The gruesome on-screen murder in the opening moments tells us this is not going to be your typical Jackie Chan film. Hong Kong's martial-arts comic, the Kung Fu Buster Keaton, is misused in this blundering and bloody debut by the former TV commercial director Kevin O'Donovan. If it weren't for a few genuine Chan novelties and the presence of the goofy Jennifer Love Hewitt, this much-delayed and re-edited mess would be a total loss.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 2, 2012
I have a bad feeling about the remake of "Total Recall," the sci-fi thriller that was adapted from Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale. " The1990 movie, which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, was a masterpiece. (And for my money, the best thing Schwarzenegger ever made, with the possible exception of "True Lies. ") The story line hasn't changed. A factory worker, in need of a vacation, heads for a company that can implant memories in the brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simmi Buttar and Simmi Buttar,Sun Staff | November 17, 2002
Forty years. Twenty films. Five 007s. And still, somehow, Bond, James Bond, retains his slick mystique. In five days -- 40 years after Dr. No, the first film to feature the perpetually cool secret agent -- the newest Bond movie will open. As we wait for Die Another Day, starring four-time Bond Pierce Brosnan and Academy Award-winning actress Halle Berry to hit the screens, here's one fan's highly personal list of favorite moments and most interesting trivia: Best local connection George Lazenby.
NEWS
May 5, 2012
Your article about Secret Service agents hiring prostitutes in Cartagena, Colombia, during a presidential trip suggests to me the agency has poor judgment from top to bottom ("Secret Service to receive ethics training at Hopkins," April 30). It's also come to light that in the past agents have indulged in similar behavior in Argentina and El Salvador. The top brass has mandated ethics training at Johns Hopkins University for agents, hoping that such training will help them steer clear of unethical behavior.
NEWS
May 4, 2012
The article "Ethics classes for Secret Service" (May 1) leaves one astonished and livid. I'm sure that the great majority of Secret Service employees don't need training in ethical behavior, having had ethical parents, educators, relatives and close friends from birth until they were hired by the Secret Service. If as adults they have not digested what ethical behavior is all about, we should examine the hiring process carefully in our assessment of what to do about the problem, not just send them to Johns Hopkins ethics classes.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
Many of us who labor in journalism inevitably have contact with U.S. Secret Service agentsand encounter men and women as devoted to their task, as serious of purpose, and as professional as any of the finest in law enforcement. So it is nothing short of shocking to learn not only of last week's scandal in Colombia but also of hints that the problem may run deeper than one night of wild partying with prostitutes in Cartagena. President Barack Obama has said that he will be "angry" if the allegations prove true, but it appears the White House is slightly behind the curve.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 2, 2012
I have a bad feeling about the remake of "Total Recall," the sci-fi thriller that was adapted from Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale. " The1990 movie, which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, was a masterpiece. (And for my money, the best thing Schwarzenegger ever made, with the possible exception of "True Lies. ") The story line hasn't changed. A factory worker, in need of a vacation, heads for a company that can implant memories in the brain.
NEWS
By Mary Pat Flaherty, The Washington Post | September 7, 2011
Stewart D. Nozette of Chevy Chase was a gifted scientist privy to America's top secrets. On Wednesday, he admitted trying to sell those secrets to a foreign government. With his guilty plea to attempted espionage, the astrophysicist was rebranded a would-be traitor. Nozette, 54, stood in an orange prison jumpsuit in the District of Columbia's federal court as he conceded that he had accepted $11,000 in cash in 2009 in exchange for passing classified materials about U.S. satellite defense systems to a person Nozette believed was an Israeli intelligence officer.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
As a Secret Service agent assigned to protect Vice President Dick Cheney in 2001, Dan Esmond witnessed firsthand the events of Sept. 11 while on duty at the Pentagon. Still affected years later by the emotional upheaval of that day, he vowed to make a difference. In 2007, he decided to work at reigniting in his fellow citizens the same profound love of country that had risen from the ashes of 9/11 and enveloped the nation. "I drove home from work one day and told my wife, 'I know what I want to do with my life.
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By Rod Stafford Hagwood and Rod Stafford Hagwood,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 9, 1991
It's ironic that the green, not-so-mean, natural '90s would take a cue from the plastic era.But for many European and American designers, the super-sexy secret agent look of the '60s found in James Bond movies, "Mission: Impossible," "The Girl From U.N.C.L.E." and "The Man From U.N.C.L.E." is ripe for this decade, too. And there is no better muse for "spy fashion" than secret agent Emma Peel.The character, played by Diana Rigg, regularly karate-chopped and kung-fued her way across the screen every week from 1965 to 1968 in the British adventure series, "The Avengers."
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 7, 1995
In discussions of the Oklahoma City atrocity there is a lot of talk about a novel called "The Turner Diaries." It is said to have been first privately published in 1978 by one William Pierce, writing under the pen name Andrew Macdonald. You will not find it in your friendly neighborhood bookstore, unless your neighborhood is infested by the sort of people who blow up federal office buildings as acts of political expression.Hate-group watchers say "The Turner Diaries" has had enormous influence among American organizations and individuals who preach and practice virulent racism, who weekend in dank forests with weapons designed not for sport but for extermination.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 11, 2008
Richard E. Mawhorr, a retired Secret Service agent and fraud inspector, died Tuesday of a stroke at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The longtime Arnold resident was 61. Mr. Mawhorr was born in Ashland, Ohio, and raised in Mansfield, Ohio. He was a 1965 graduate of Mansfield High School and earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1978. During the Vietnam War, he served with the Air Force military police. He was a graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Va., and from 1970 until retiring in 1990, served as a lieutenant in the Secret Service's Uniformed Division.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | June 2, 2008
The electronic mailbag runneth over, so to speak, with the observations, exhortations and ruminations of readers. Let's hear from the folks. Kathy Dodson of Baltimore was appalled that the General Assembly didn't take action to ban the all-too-common practice of driving while texting when it had a chance. The General Assembly members need to stop being stupid and/or stop taking bribes for their votes. They also probably do a lot of texting or their kids do, therefore do not want to ban texting.
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