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NEWS
April 13, 2006
Federal agencies have been whiting-out history for at least the past six years, but it's all hush-hush. The reclassification of 55,000 documents that had long been available to public view didn't involve much big stuff, such as nuclear stockpiles. Most of it was just embarrassing, such as accounts of the many times world developments caught U.S. intelligence experts by surprise or of a goofy Cold War scheme to leaflet Eastern Europe by hot-air balloon. Much had been published and is widely available.
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FEATURES
Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Nicholas Cuttonaro relishes the chance to grab a spicy tuna roll at his favorite sushi restaurants, Sushi Ya in Owings Mills and Sushi Sono in Columbia. But a couple of months ago, he decided to make his sushi-eating experience more interactive by signing up for a class in which he honed his knife skills and learned how to make sticky rice to place inside a sushi roll. The instructor at Pikesville's For the Love of Food offered students the chance to experiment with tuna, salmon, lobster and shrimp.
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NEWS
December 8, 2005
If it's Thursday, then it must be Belgium, and it's doubtful that Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice will put to rest European concerns over reports that the United States has secretly detained terrorism suspects in Eastern Europe. Ms. Rice departed on her weeklong, four-country trip with her anti-torture remarks at the ready. But her insistence that the U.S. "does not authorize or condone torture of detainees" didn't convince the Dutch or European Union leaders or some of her German hosts with whom she visited Tuesday.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
The Secret Service's failures were so many, so egregious and so ineptly handled that they require immediate action. The resignation of agency director Julia A. Pierson is a good first step ("Housecleaning at the Secret Service," Oct. 1). It's clear from facts that keep dribbling out that the agency has a systemic problem that can't be fixed by those who caused or tolerated it. Everyone from the top down who was involved in the numerous failures should be replaced from outside the agency because if the Secret Service is to fulfill its mission, failure is not an option.
NEWS
By Julia Alvarez | March 14, 2001
Editor's note: A curious girl bridges the distance between two cultures. On an island not too far away and in a time not so long ago lived a secret tribe called the ciguapas. They made their homes underwater in cool blue caves hung with seashells and seaweed. They came out on land to hunt for food only at night because they were so fearful of humans. Luckily, the ciguapas had a special secret that kept them safe from people. Their feet were on backward! When they walked on land, they left footprints going in the opposite direction.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | April 30, 1994
The story of Aldrich H. Ames, the CIA spymaster who pleaded guilty this week to handing over American secrets to the former Soviet KGB, could almost have been written by that acknowledged master of the espionage thriller, John le Carre. But Ames is a far less interesting a character than any the novelist might have imagined.On Thursday Ames admitted being paid more than $2 million over a seven-year period by his Moscow handlers in exchange for identifying Soviet citizens working for the CIA.The government charged that Ames' betrayal resulted in the unmasking and execution of at least a dozen Eastern block agents employed by Washington.
NEWS
April 11, 1994
The National Security Agency, the ultra-secretive spy agency based at Fort George G. Meade, does its best to keep quiet about what goes on there. That is as it should be, as far as cracking codes and collecting data from satellites and microwave dishes worldwide is concerned. But one of NSA's dirtier secrets is being edged into the public eye, where it belongs: a disturbing record of unfair employment practices.NSA has one of the worst minority hiring and promotion records in the federal government, with only 11 percent of its roughly 20,000-member work force composed of minorities compared to 27 percent in the government as a whole.
NEWS
By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
There was a moment when Gary Vikan was sitting on the 12th floor of the Legg Mason building last fall looking at a dizzying array of charts and numbers. The charts were designed to convey the feelings and attitudes outsiders had of the great city where he lived and worked. But he was dumbstruck. Apparently all the people who lived within 250 miles of Baltimore and had never been here weren't particularly impressed. Those who had, however, were quick to give Baltimore top marks. The divergence of opinions was such that even officials of Longwoods International, the tourism research firm presenting the data, said they had rarely seen such a stark divide.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Before all you harried workers grouse about your grueling jobs and long hours, here's a message for you: Get back to work. You know who you are. If you're surfing the Web, bidding on eBay or buying a book from Amazon.com at your desk, you're guilty. If you're gabbing with co-workers about how Dancing with the Stars is your secret moral weakness or watching Lance Armstrong overpower his rivals in the Tour de France, you're guilty. The secret is out. The average American worker wastes more than two hours a day - 2.09 hours per eight-hour workday, to be exact - or twice the amount their bosses expect that they'll fritter away, according to a new survey of more than 10,000 workers polled by America Online and Salary.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the price of refinished desks from the state Agency for Surplus Property in Jessup. The desks are available for $25 at the warehouse sale taking place today, but refinishing costs extra.The Sun regrets the error.A caption incorrectly identified the man reupholstering a chair in a photograph on Page 1C of yesterday's editions of The Sun. The man is Perry Hudson.The Sun regrets the error.It's the state's attic, a 60,000-square-foot warehouse in Jessup packed with old furniture, computers, dental equipment, surf boards, ship's engines and front-end loaders.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
Recent revelations about the performance of the U.S. Secret Service ( "Cummings suggests Pierson should resign Secret Service post," Oct. 1) suggest that it is too heavy on the secrets and too light on the service. Charles W. Mitchell, Parkton - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
I was amused at how the Secret Service combed the White House property after a deranged man scaled the fence and gained entry. In a whimsical way it reminded me of the annual Easter egg hunt held on the White House grounds. It was a very lame way to attempt to save face after such an embarrassing episode. The Secret Service has been in a downward spiral ever since it fell under the auspices of Homeland Security. Until the supposedly elite entity is returned to the Department of the Treasury, we should probably expect more of the same antics at the White House.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Elijah E. Cummings appeared to call Wednesday for U.S. Secret Service Director Julia Pierson to step down over a series of recent security breaches at the White House -- becoming the first member of Congress to do so -- but then later softened his stance on the matter. The Baltimore lawmaker, the top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, used several national media appearances Wednesday to say he did not believe Pierson's testimony before his committee on Tuesday conveyed a sense of urgency in addressing the problems.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Secret Service director Julia A. Pierson did herself no favors this week when she appeared before a House subcommittee to explain why her agency so badly bungled the job of protecting the president. There's no excuse for the repeated lapses in security that put the president's life at risk, nor for the agency's attempts to hide the seriousness of the incidents afterward. Ms. Pierson finally acknowledged that today when she submitted her resignation as head of the agency. In the days leading up to her departure, Ms. Pierson had promised a thorough internal investigation of the matter, but that's not good enough.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Last week, Gannett Co. Inc., owner of The Daily Times in Salisbury, filed a lawsuit in Worcester County Circuit Court to force Ocean City to release the name of a 17-year-old drowning victim from Parkville. A number of the newspaper's readers have already expressed outrage at the litigation, with one letter writer describing it as "wrong, just plain wrong" and others questioning what possible public interest is served by knowing the name, particularly given that the victim's family has specifically asked that it not be released.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The state attorney general's office is appealing a federal judge's ruling ordering Maryland to use an absentee ballot-marking technology for the disabled that the Board of Elections had refused to certify as secure. The state will ask the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., to throw out District Judge Richard D. Bennett's decision this month. Bennett found that the election board's refusal to implement the program violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act. The attorney general's office filed a notice of intent to appeal Monday but did not spell out its objections to the ruling.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | June 22, 2008
Let me let you in on the secret. Not "a" secret, but "the" secret. The Secret is a little book by Rhonda Byrne that has become a pop culture phenomenon. You might say The Secret came into my life in an odd way, unless you already know about the secret, in which case you will hear the story of how the secret came into my life and believe I willed it there with my positive thoughts - which is exactly how the secret works! I was helping out a neighbor, sitting with her ill child while she was out for the afternoon.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Date: May 31 Her story: Kia Houston, 37, grew up in Baltimore and Randallstown. She is a budget specialist for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her parents, Vernetta and Daniel Wilson, live in Randallstown. His story: Mike Castille, 38, grew up in Queens, N.Y. He is a systems engineer for Johns Hopkins Community Physicians. His mother and stepfather, Brenda and Lester Yard, live in Bowie. His father, Nolan Castille, lives in Queens. Their story: Kia and Mike met in late 2007 when they were both working at MBNA Corp., which was based in Baltimore at the time.
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