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By David Troy | January 3, 2012
The embarrassing and unfortunate financial failure of the Baltimore Grand Prix was caused by a pervasive culture of secrecy and privilege within City Hall and at Baltimore Racing Development. Had more facts been available to the press and the public, it would have been abundantly clear that the race was in jeopardy even in its earliest planning phases. The failure to secure a lead sponsor was, in retrospect, a body-blow that should have led to the race's cancellation or postponement.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A surveillance camera near the East Baltimore murder scene spied a group from the Black Guerrilla Family gathered to congratulate a gang member on a job well done - a long-time rival was dead and a prior killing avenged. Henry Mills had been a BGF target since the gang started to take over the drug trade along a stretch of Greenmount Avenue years before, and he was suspected of murdering a senior BGF figure, authorities say. By 2011 Mills' insistence on running a freelance heroin operation on gang territory was too much to tolerate.
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NEWS
January 30, 2003
CONTROVERSIES have paralyzed the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association so long that the impending exit of its president, Carroll R. Armstrong, is not enough to cure the mess. Only a full public airing of the agency's deficiencies can ensure a turnaround in the city's lackluster tourism effort. That's why it's flabbergasting that the BACVA board, citing spurious privacy concerns, refuses to release a recently completed outsider's evaluation. Last September, when veteran marketing executive Marshall Murdaugh was hired to oversee the performance review, BACVA promised to make the results public.
NEWS
By Ragina Cooper-Averella | January 30, 2014
Legislative reforms are desperately needed to address issues with Maryland's speed camera programs in school zones, particularly in Baltimore City, where the problems have been so pervasive and so well-documented that the system has been suspended since April. We know that speed camera citations have been issued to deceased motorists and "signed" and authorized by a deceased police officer. Motorists have been cited for speeding in school zones when they were not moving at all - including a AAA Mid-Atlantic roadside assistance truck, which was cited for going 57 miles per hour in a school zone, despite being stopped at a red light.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | December 28, 1993
ANYONE who remembers when Americans instinctively trusted their government is by definition an antique.Today the general assumption is that our officials deceive us. President Clinton says that one of his striking impressions since coming to Washington has been the pervasive public cynicism about government.The change in American attitudes has had one major cause, I believe: secrecy. During the years of the Cold War, opposing a conspiratorial adversary, the United States for the first time developed an enormous permanent national security apparatus -- and a culture of secrecy to match.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 27, 2012
The defense attorney for 28-year-old Michael Johnson, charged with first-degree murder in the killing of Phylicia Barnes, told reporters on Thursday that his client had been struck and kicked during his arrest. He disputed a statement from the city's top prosecutor that the arrest went down "without incident. " But trying to track down what actually happened has been a frustrating ordeal, not just on the allegations of mistreatment, but the aura of secrecy surrounding this high-profile case.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
While the main campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is open and inviting, there is another division of the school that discourages visitors. The Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is tucked miles away in Laurel, with building access blocked by guards. Outsiders enter with an approved escort for the most part, handing over proof of identity first. Much of what goes on in there is secret — including some of the billions of dollars in work the lab does for the federal government.
NEWS
November 26, 1993
Every step in the criminal justice system, from arrest to incarceration, is conducted in full public view -- until the very end. Once a convicted criminal, who may well have lost some of his civil rights at sentencing, is eligible for parole, he acquires some privacy rights, at least in the minds of Maryland correction officials. Decisions on parole release, and the records that deal with them, are secret. We see no justification for that secrecy.State parole officials don't really attempt to justify the secrecy, except for the need to keep certain kinds of records confidential, like psychiatric material.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Everyone likes to be let in on a secret, even if it's one that will eventually become public. If you get to be part of the in-group, you gain some loyalty to whoever let you in. The same for someone who lets you in on a secret planning meeting. General Growth Properties Inc. has invited members of the ten Columbia village boards to a closed-door meeting on 13 December. They should decline to attend. The Columbia Association Board has already declined a similar invitation, and as far as I know, the County Council has not been invited.
NEWS
By DAVID SIROTA | May 23, 2006
Money is not a bad thing. And secrecy doesn't have to be, either. But when the two mix, you can bet someone is going to get bilked. Look no further than Congress' corruption scandals and corporate America's excessive pay packages to know this is the case. Though the situations seem unrelated, they revolve around the confluence of money and secrecy. Lawmakers and executives are making out like bandits while taxpayers and company shareholders are getting ripped off. In Congress, corruption is emanating from the appropriations committees - the panels overseeing federal spending.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
While the main campus of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore is open and inviting, there is another division of the school that discourages visitors. The Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is tucked miles away in Laurel, with building access blocked by guards. Outsiders enter with an approved escort for the most part, handing over proof of identity first. Much of what goes on in there is secret — including some of the billions of dollars in work the lab does for the federal government.
NEWS
By Amy Bennett and Angela Canterbury | August 7, 2013
We already know that federal regulators have undermined accountability for abuses by mortgage servicing companies. In another disturbing development, the Federal Reserve and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) are refusing to turn over information to members of Congress that could help them prevent such abuses from happening again. A recent study of the Independent Foreclosure Review process by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) cited significant flaws, including a lack of transparency, in the design and implementation of the process.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
I have been following the actions of the Baltimore County government and the sale of county-owned property with great interest and concern. In all of my years on the County Council and in the House of Delegates, I have never seen such actions as these perpetrated against county residents in such a cavalier and reckless manner. Across Baltimore County, residents are upset and angry at the government for one very important reason: They have been kept out of the line of communication and not been allowed any public input in decisions that affect them directly.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | April 2, 2013
Supporters and critics of legislation that would grant farmers a 10-year reprieve from new environmental regulations squared off before a House committee Tuesday, with much of the debate focused on provisions in the bill barring any public disclosure of those granted the deferral. Farm group representatives, O'Malley administration officials and others told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee that offering state farmers a shield from new environmental cleanup requirements could boost efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay.  Farmers would voluntarily agree to reduce polluted runoff of soil and fertilizer from their farms beyond what they're now required to do, proponents say. Sen. Thomas M. Middleton, the bill's chief sponsor, said many farmers are having to invest in new equipment and facilities now to comply with recently adopted state regulations on how, when and where fertilizer can be spread on the ground.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 8, 2012
Who's buying our democracy? Wall Street financiers, the Koch brothers, and casino magnates Sheldon Adelson and Steve Wynn, among others. And they're doing much of it in secret. It's a perfect storm -- the combination of three waves that are about to drown government as we know it. The first is the greatest concentration of wealth in America in more than a century. The 400 richest Americans are richer than the bottom 150 million Americans put together. The trend started 30 years ago, and it's related to globalization and technological changes that have stymied wage growth for most people.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 2, 2012
Three children - an 8-year-old boy and two 9-year-old girls - who police took out of their elementary school in handcuffs earlier this year had hearings before a juvenile judge on Tuesday. They had been charged with aggravated assault, accused of vicious playground attacks in Southwest Baltimore. But while the allegations were well published, driven by the ages of the children and where they were arrested, at a school in Southwest Baltimore's Morrell Park, what is happening to them now is shrouded in the secrecy of the juvenile justice system.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | March 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The secrecy surrounding the president' health care reform task force has produced a bonanza for specialty publications that -- for prices of up to $600 -- promise to tell subscribers what the government won't.Even though the Clinton administration announced yesterday that it will lift some of the secrecy and release the names of more than 500 people who work for the task force, that won't hurt these publications. They will continue trying to ferret out what's happening in the all-important task force staff meetings, which the administration has no intention of opening to the public.
FEATURES
By James Asher and James Asher,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
"Secrecy: The American Experience," by Daniel Patrick Moynihan. Yale University Press. 262 pages. $22.50. Daniel Patrick Moynihan is the senior U.S. senator from New York State and - if the assessment of the FBI and the late J. Edgar Hoover is worth much - an egghead and skunk.His newest book, "Secrecy: The American Experience," is proof that the nation could use more such intellectual rascals. In didactic detail, Moynihan builds an impressive argument that secrecy is not the ointment to preserve democracy but the oil upon which our liberties slip.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 27, 2012
The defense attorney for 28-year-old Michael Johnson, charged with first-degree murder in the killing of Phylicia Barnes, told reporters on Thursday that his client had been struck and kicked during his arrest. He disputed a statement from the city's top prosecutor that the arrest went down "without incident. " But trying to track down what actually happened has been a frustrating ordeal, not just on the allegations of mistreatment, but the aura of secrecy surrounding this high-profile case.
NEWS
By David Troy | January 3, 2012
The embarrassing and unfortunate financial failure of the Baltimore Grand Prix was caused by a pervasive culture of secrecy and privilege within City Hall and at Baltimore Racing Development. Had more facts been available to the press and the public, it would have been abundantly clear that the race was in jeopardy even in its earliest planning phases. The failure to secure a lead sponsor was, in retrospect, a body-blow that should have led to the race's cancellation or postponement.
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