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Secondhand Smoke

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NEWS
May 30, 1991
A draft report sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies concludes that secondhand cigarette smoke kills 53,000 non-smokers a year, including 37,000 from heart disease. We'd like to hear from both smokers and non-smokers about the effects of secondhand smoke and the rights of smokers.To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in a four-digit code on your touch-tone phone.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced Wednesday that it will no longer permit visitors to smoke on its grounds beginning July 1. The zoo said that it will ask visitors to leave the grounds to smoke or use tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. The zoo had previously prohibited smoking inside buildings under the Clean Indoor Air Act of Maryland, which was passed in 2007. The zoo's decision comes after the City Council voted this year to ban smoking near playgrounds, swimming pools and ball fields.
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EXPLORE
July 18, 2011
The griping about the smoking ban in our public parks falls on deaf ears for me. One complaint I heard was about a smoker being forced to stop if his neighbor could "smell the smoke. " It's not smelling smoke that's bad, it's breathing smoke that's lethal. We deserve the right to breath clean air anywhere, anytime. Carole Fisher Ellicott City
NEWS
June 15, 2014
Whether the air quality in a hookah lounge is outstandingly fresh or alarmingly toxic, the real benefit to those who use these facilities is they can continue their lifestyle without endangering us ( "Study discovers poor air quality in hookah lounges," June 12). We have to suffer toxic smoke fumes every time we go outdoors in Baltimore. What good would a study do anyway? We know unquestionably that tobacco smoke along with secondhand smoke makes the user and the bystander eventually suffer a premature, agonizing and slow death.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The tobacco industry began what is expected to be a vigorous counterattack against the government assault on smoking yesterday as R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. launched a public relations campaign to "bring some balance to the debate surrounding secondhand smoke and other issues surrounding cigarettes."In full-page advertisements in major U.S. newspapers, the company claimed that non-smokers are routinely exposed to "very little" secondhand smoke.The ads claimed that, in a month, a non-smoker living with a smoker would be exposed to environmental smoke that was, on average, the equivalent of smoking 1 1/2 cigarettes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 1997
MIAMI -- Lawyers for the tobacco industry and 60,000 U.S. flight attendants are girding for the start this week of a trial that will test the industry's liability for illnesses supposedly caused by secondhand smoke.The case, known as Broin vs. Philip Morris, is the first to seek damages for bystanders supposedly harmed by smoke from other people's cigarettes. It will also be the first tobacco case of any kind tried on behalf of a whole class of plaintiffs, where an industry defeat could bring damages in the billions of dollars.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Three staples of modern life -- secondhand cigarette smoke, alcohol and diesel exhaust -- will likely soon be added to the official federal government list of cancer-causing agents, an action with potentially large regulatory and legal effects.An influential independent panel of scientists probably will recommend that course after what are expected to be contentious hearings on the three substances today and tomorrow at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Environmental Protection Agency announced guidelines yesterday on smoking in public buildings to help curb illness from secondhand tobacco smoke.The EPA asked all companies and agencies operating public buildings to either ban smoking or use ventilation to ensure that people are protected from secondhand smoke.The guidelines are voluntary, reinforcing the the EPA's stand, announced in January, in which it declared that secondhand smoke causes cancer and respiratory disease and should be regulated.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2003
Secondhand smoke does not appear to increase the risk for lung cancer and heart disease, says a study in the British Medical Journal that was partly funded by the tobacco industry. The study was quickly criticized by the American Cancer Society and other health groups as misleading and unreliable. "We are appalled that the tobacco industry has succeeded in giving visibility to a study with so many problems it literally failed to get a government grant," said Dr. Michael J. Thun, the society's national vice president of epidemiology.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1992
The first direct medical evidence that secondhand smoke can damage the lungs of non-smokers has been produced by an international team led by researchers at Harvard University.The team performed autopsies on the 30 non-smoking women and found that the lungs from the wives of smokers contained a "significantly higher" number of precancerous abnormalities -- such as cellular proliferation and damage -- than did lungs from the wives of non-smokers.Previous studies showing a higher incidence of lung cancer among wives and children of smokers have been based on statistical evidence and suggest that at least 4,000 people die from lung cancer each year as the result of inhaling secondhand smoke.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
No amount of committee meetings or government recommendations will result in improving the health of people who smoke, are overweight or underexercised. The only thing that can help people with these particular health problems - them being us - is us. The county health department and various public interest groups can let us know tobacco use and overindulgence at the dinner table are particularly acute problems for people in Harford County, but it's up to those of us who would rather watch TV or surf the web than take a brisk walk, who would puff on cigarettes and ignore 50 years of warnings, who would go back to the buffet for seconds or more to do something about it. The ones who suffer the consequences are largely those of us who fail to heed the warnings.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
It's my understanding that the Baltimore County Council, including Catonsville's own Tom Quirk, passed legislation making it a crime — punishable by a fine of up to $50 — to smoke a cigarette at outdoor playgrounds, tot lots, dog parks, athletic fields, and anywhere within 30 feet of buildings in which Baltimore County sporting events are held. Why? Mostly to protect the children from possibly inhaling secondhand smoke while in the great outdoors or outside buildings in which they may be playing or watching games.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Every year, some 400,000 Americans die from smoking-related illnesses, the vast majority of them caused by cigarettes. As many as 40,000 more die from the effects of inhaling secondhand smoke, making cigarettes one of the leading causes of premature death in this country. It's hardly an exaggeration to say that any other product that presented such a clear and present danger to public health would be illegal. That's why a coalition of public health advocates has proposed a $1-per-pack increase in Maryland's cigarette tax to encourage longtime smokers to finally kick the habit and to dissuade younger people, particularly teenagers, from taking it up. Every time Maryland has raised its cigarette tax, which now stands at $2 a pack, smoking has gone down and lives have been saved.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2012
If the smoking ban on Harford County government properties applies to parks and recreation ball fields, there's no reason why it can't apply to the County Courthouse, official excuses notwithstanding. Beginning Jan. 1, smoking on county property was banned, a move that came as welcome news for anyone - government employees and members of the general public alike - who has been subjected to secondhand smoke while trying to run the siege line of smokers standing outside various county government buildings.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | December 1, 2011
Few things are quite as unsightly as the piles of cigarette butts that accumulate in low spots on parking lots and the gutters on the sides of roads. It seems even as most kinds of littering have become less frequent, flicking a butt out a car window remains just another unsavory aspect of the practice of smoking. Mercifully for those of us who don't smoke, this irritating practice will be that much less part of the scene as Harford County government is poised to ban smoking — indeed all tobacco use — on county-owned and leased properties, inside and out. Here in Maryland, one of the last strongholds of smoking rights owing to the state's centuries of tobacco growing tradition, smoking indoors has been illegal for years, and it's not hard to strike up a conversation about how odd it seems to walk into a lobby in states where lobby smoking is still permitted.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Baltimore County plans to prohibit employees from smoking in government vehicles, including police cars and maintenance trucks, a county health official confirmed. Dr. Gregory Wm. Branch, the county health officer, recommended the move to county Administrative Officer Fred Homan last week, citing the health risks of secondhand smoke. "Secondhand smoke can remain in [homes and cars] through contaminated dust and surfaces, even if smoking took place days, weeks and even months earlier," Branch wrote in the letter obtained by The Baltimore Sun. "The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has concluded that secondhand smoke is an occupational carcinogen.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | December 4, 1994
Talbot County's tough smoking law was passed to protect people from fumes streaming off other people's cigarettes. But what is the hazard? Is it death, illness or mere annoyance?Ask the Environmental Protection Agency or the American Heart Association and you will hear that secondhand smoke not only makes people ill, but causes thousands of fatal lung cancers and heart attacks that wouldn't have occurred in a smoke-free environment.Ask the tobacco industry, and you will hear that the EPA has engaged in pseudo-science, skewing its research to reach the politically correct conclusion that cigarette smoke is lethal even for nonsmokers.
EXPLORE
July 18, 2011
The griping about the smoking ban in our public parks falls on deaf ears for me. One complaint I heard was about a smoker being forced to stop if his neighbor could "smell the smoke. " It's not smelling smoke that's bad, it's breathing smoke that's lethal. We deserve the right to breath clean air anywhere, anytime. Carole Fisher Ellicott City
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Howard County, which led the way in prohibiting smoking indoors, plans to extend the ban outdoors to all county parks, a move that would be the first of its kind in the state. "It's something we've been looking at for some time," County Executive Ken Ulman said in an interview, adding that it's another goal toward making "Howard County the healthiest county it can be. " Smoking, he said, "is not in keeping with that. It's a dirty, filthy habit. " Ulman plans on issuing an executive order that applies to all 57 park properties, but does not include open space and parks owned by the Columbia Association.
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