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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
Carroll County's new director of secondary schools will be Greg Eckles, now director of curriculum and staff development and a former principal of North Carroll High School.Eckles will replace Peter B. McDowell, who announced last month that he will retire at the end of this month. While many people inside the school system were expecting one of the current high school principals to succeed McDowell, the position was never advertised.Superintendent Brian Lockard said yesterday that he chose to ask Eckles to take McDowell's place because of his experience as a principal and a director and to advertise the curriculum director position instead.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 7, 2012
Schools are contributing to the childhood obesity problem by selling unhealthy snacks, new research has found. A study by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that most of the country's secondary schools do not offer fruits and vegetables as snack options. Fewer than half of secondary schools in 49 states sold fruits and vegetables in snack venues in 2010, according to the study. Chocolate, candy bars and chips were more common. The researchers found that while many states reduced the availability of  high-calorie snacks in secondary schools between 2002 and 2008, the efforts have since waned.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 2005
In the world of education philanthropy, colleges and universities traditionally have received about twice as much grant money as elementary and secondary schools. But in the past few years there has been a quiet revolution in education giving, as a new generation of wealthy entrepreneurs, concerned about high dropout rates and low achievement levels, has begun pouring so much money into projects for kindergarten through 12th grade that such grants now outpace foundation giving to higher education.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
As authorities continued to investigate the shooting at Perry Hall High School, about two dozen students gathered at a church Monday night, recounting their fears during the incident - and a reluctance to go back to school. "You just think, if it happens once, it can happen again," said senior Kyle Ritter. He said he would welcome more security on campus: "If it's going to stop all this craziness, I think it'd be a good idea. " School safety experts say that while it's understandable for some to want metal detectors and other visible signs of beefed-up security, less invasive measures usually offer the best way to keep out guns and other dangerous weapons.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 7, 2012
Schools are contributing to the childhood obesity problem by selling unhealthy snacks, new research has found. A study by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that most of the country's secondary schools do not offer fruits and vegetables as snack options. Fewer than half of secondary schools in 49 states sold fruits and vegetables in snack venues in 2010, according to the study. Chocolate, candy bars and chips were more common. The researchers found that while many states reduced the availability of  high-calorie snacks in secondary schools between 2002 and 2008, the efforts have since waned.
NEWS
September 24, 2002
Maryland's public elementary and secondary schools have about 16 pupils per teacher - more than 32 other states. Utah's classrooms are the most crowded, with 22.1 pupils per teacher. The national ratio is 16-1. Figures are early estimates from the 2000-200 1 school year, and states are listed from smallest ratio to largest. State......Pupils per teacher......Rank Vermont..............11.9...............1 Massachusetts......12.4............2 Maine..................12.6...............
SPORTS
December 17, 1990
It's time for the public school teams in Baltimore City to join the state high school association and compete for a true state championship, according to the majority of Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL over the weekend.Of the 301 callers, 212 (70 percent) said they were in favor of teams in the Maryland Scholastic Association uniting with their county counterparts in the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association. The other 89 callers (30 percent) said they like the situation as it is now, with the city schools remaining as a separate group.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 2000
Almost half of the money from federal education programs is going to the poorest schools in the country, but those schools continue to be short of qualified teachers and technological resources, including computers with Internet access, says a report from the Department of Education. The report, released Friday, examined six federal programs, including the Title I program that allocates $8 billion each year to try to help disadvantaged children get access to teachers and computers.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1996
One of the school system's most widely respected administrators, Peter B. McDowell, will retire next month.McDowell, director of secondary schools since 1987 and principal at Westminster High School for 10 years before that, completed his 30th year in the Carroll schools in June.A memo circulated through the schools Friday announcing his retirement."Very, very sad news," said Donald Pyles, principal at Sykesville Middle School. "He's a terrific gentleman and a wise, wise person. He was out in the schools all the time and knew the teachers personally."
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly | December 5, 1990
LINWOOD METHOD DISCUSSED AT FORUM50 Years Ago (week of Dec. 1-7, 1940):* The first annual Lisbon Community Fair was held this week in the auditorium of the Lisbon High School. The event was sponsored by the Lisbon chapter of the Future Farmers of America and featured moving pictures and a display of tractors, as well as exhibits of poultry, eggs, farm crops, potatoes, winter vegetables, canned goods and needlework.* Herbert C. Brown, superintendent of schools, announced that Howard County was willing to open up school shops for the training of defense workers.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
It would be nice if Baltimore County did in fact have some of the nation's best secondary schools. But the methodology used by the Newsweek survey supporting that finding is seriously flawed. The results, which should be taken with a grain of salt, only serve to reinforce the system-wide satisfaction with a mediocre status quo. By basing its rankings of high schools on the number of Advanced Placement exams students take compared to the size of their graduating class, the Newsweek study completely ignores student performance.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
The Maryland Senate approved its version of the state's annual budget Thursday, drawing vocal opposition from education advocates who warn that lawmakers are shortchanging schools. Amid plunging state tax revenues, the Senate voted 40-7 for the $13.8 billion spending plan that incorporates hundreds of millions of dollars from a federal economic stimulus package while trimming local government aid and various programs. The budget is now in the hands of a cross-chamber conference committee with the House of Delegates, which made fewer spending cuts than the Senate.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas and Ruma Kumar and Susan Gvozdas,Sun Reporters | April 27, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council is closer to passing a measure that would revamp the way school capacity is determined and could pave the way for more affordable housing development. The proposed legislation that could have drastically affected how schools are filled and housing developments proceed has steadily softened under heavy criticism from parents, school system officials and developers. Initial versions sought to raise the definition of "full" at elementary and secondary schools to 105 and 110 percent capacity, respectively.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
John E. "Jack" Molesworth, former executive director of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association and a Western Maryland College football coach, died Friday at Frederick Memorial Hospital of complications from a fall. He was 80. Mr. Molesworth was born in Baltimore and raised on his family's Frederick County farm. After graduating from Frederick High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served with the 2nd Marine Division in occupied Japan. In 1948, Mr. Molesworth enrolled at Western Maryland College, where he played center for the Green Terrors football team and boxed.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | August 26, 2007
Last week I went shopping in our small rural hometown, where my family has attended the same public schools since 1896. Without exception, all six generations of us - whether farmers, housewives, day laborers, businesspeople, writers, lawyers or educators - were given a good, competitive K-12 education. But after a haircut, I noticed that the 20-something cashier could not count out change. The next day, at the electronics outlet store, another young clerk could not read - much less explain - the basic English of the buyer's warranty.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 2005
In the world of education philanthropy, colleges and universities traditionally have received about twice as much grant money as elementary and secondary schools. But in the past few years there has been a quiet revolution in education giving, as a new generation of wealthy entrepreneurs, concerned about high dropout rates and low achievement levels, has begun pouring so much money into projects for kindergarten through 12th grade that such grants now outpace foundation giving to higher education.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
It would be nice if Baltimore County did in fact have some of the nation's best secondary schools. But the methodology used by the Newsweek survey supporting that finding is seriously flawed. The results, which should be taken with a grain of salt, only serve to reinforce the system-wide satisfaction with a mediocre status quo. By basing its rankings of high schools on the number of Advanced Placement exams students take compared to the size of their graduating class, the Newsweek study completely ignores student performance.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
No penalties will be levied against 16 public school teams in last month's Lackey wrestling tournament despite their being in violation of state association rules by competing against home-schooled athletes representing Progressive Christian Academy of Temple Hills. The Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association mailed letters yesterday to each school detailing results of an investigation by executive director Ned Sparks and state wrestling chairman Duke Beattie. "It was an impossibility to shake out who knew or did what" and to determine whether schools from seven counties knowingly wrestled home-schoolers, said a source familiar with the investigation who requested anonymity.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
No penalties will be levied against 16 public school teams in last month's Lackey wrestling tournament despite their being in violation of state association rules by competing against home-schooled athletes representing Progressive Christian Academy of Temple Hills. The Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association mailed letters yesterday to each school detailing results of an investigation by executive director Ned Sparks and state wrestling chairman Duke Beattie. "It was an impossibility to shake out who knew or did what" and to determine whether schools from seven counties knowingly wrestled home-schoolers, said a source familiar with the investigation who requested anonymity.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
John Burghardt and Layne Restrick are professional nomads. Every morning, they pack the tools of their work - pencils, folders, papers and books - onto metal carts and ply the crowded halls of Edgewood High School, where he teaches math and she English. Floating teachers, as they're called, are among the growing number of Maryland teachers without a classroom, who carry lessons to students in backpacks, carts and wheeled suitcases. They are a byproduct of rapid growth in suburban counties where school enrollments have swelled past capacity.
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