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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2003
They danced the jitterbug and sang the songs of Glenn Miller. They re-enacted the dinner conversation of a food-rationing, SPAM-eating family of the 1940s. And they tested the fitness of the men in the audience as prospective U.S. soldiers. "Congratulations, you're now eligible to fight for our country," 10-year-old Cody Coon declared after the men successfully marched, read from a chart of poster-sized letters and jumped when they heard three cymbal clashes. "Uncle Sam wants you, you, you!"
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SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Bethesda native Katie Ledecky came into Saturday's 800-meter freestyle final at the FINA World Championships with three gold medals and a 1,500 freestyle world record last week. On Saturday, she again was the swimmer to beat, and again, nobody was able to do it. Ledecky won her final swim in Barcelona, Spain, by adding her second world record of the meet, topping Rebecca Adlington's former mark set in 2008 with a time of 8 minutes, 13.86 seconds. "It's good to finish off on a great note," said Ledecky, who previously won the 400 free and 4x200 free relay.
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NEWS
September 18, 1992
More than 60 World War II veterans and their wives are expected at the BWI Days Inn this weekend for a reunion of Company D, 303rd Infantry Regiment, 97th Infantry Division.The company fought in Germany and Czechoslovakia during the Second World War. Its successor, the 97th Army Reserve Command (ARCOM), has been based at Fort George G. Meade for the last 10 years.The veterans, many coming from as far away as California, are scheduled to tour Washington, Fort McHenry and Annapolis during their three-day stay.
NEWS
December 7, 2011
Seventy years ago today, Japan launched a surprise attack on America's Pacific fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, drawing the United States into the second World War. More than 2,400 Americans were killed in the attack, including four Marylanders, all of whom were serving aboard the U.S.S. Arizona: Fireman 1st Class Howard T. Anderson; Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Clyde J. Rawson; Yeoman 2nd Class Jack M. Restivo; and Shipfitter 3rd Class Victor C. Tambolleo. The war that followed would take a terrible toll - including 770 from Maryland killed, 928 wounded and 18 missing in action.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | April 6, 2008
The Second World Empires and Influence in the New Global Order By Parag Khanna Random House / 496 pages / $28.95 In the 21st century, according to Parag Khanna, three empires strut their stuff on the world stage. The United States, the European Union and China are "frenemies." Globalization fosters interdependence. But fear and greed continue to drive geopolitical competition. "Arrayed along and sandwiched between" the superpowers, Khanna points out, are Second World countries. Encompassing the world's emerging markets, they are divided between haves and have-nots and may or may not be moving toward democracy.
NEWS
February 12, 1991
Sen. Alan Simpson, the Republican whip from Wyoming, is noted for his anti-press comments. They often have a jovial, you-versus-us quality to them. Most journalists accept this. If you dish it out, you have to take it, too. But the senator's remarks last week about CNN correspondent Peter Arnett went beyond the normal punch and counter-punch of politics and journalism. He hit below the belt.Senator Simpson said Mr. Arnett's reporting from Baghdad was "repulsive. . . My question is, why is he the only one there?"
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 14, 1990
The question: How do you get teen-agers to grasp the differences between the haves and the have-nots in this world?The answer: Let them eat rice.At Notre Dame Preparatory School, a private, Roman Catholic girls' school in Baltimore County, all 437 high school students were invited yesterday to a $2-per-person banquet to benefit the hungry.What they didn't know until moments before sitting down was that not all meals would be equal. Students were divided into three groups, based on per capita income statistics that reflect allocation of the world's resources.
NEWS
July 8, 1994
OVER the past few years, the print and electronic media have devoted a good deal of type and air time to remembrances of World War II. All of the looking back at the 50th anniversary of this or that pivotal moment or battle will continue at least through August 1995, with the marking of V-J Day plus 50 years.As a sort of counterpart, we offer a piece that looked ahead to the Second World War. The writer is the late American essayist E.B. White, and the time is December 1941, just after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
October 15, 1991
Moscow joined the Third World at the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund in Thailand this week, opening itself to scrutiny and financial discipline long imposed on less developed countries. Such a step downward for the leader of the Second World was not acknowledged, nor was it welcomed by endemically poor countries that fear their share in First World riches will diminish.Yet there was no denying that the collapse of the Soviet Union is at the top of the world economic agenda.
NEWS
By Alejandro Portes | December 11, 1996
RETURNING TO CUBA in 1996 is a remarkable experience for one born in the island. Once you get over the pangs of nostalgia, you note that you are in a complex country that somehow functions. True, things are rickety and faded, but generally trains and planes leave on time, the national ballet still offers quality performances, classes are taught at the university.Accustomed as we are to the regular defections of boxers, baseball players and pilots and their subsequent tales of woe, we get the impression that Cuban society has imploded and that the economy is hanging by a string.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | August 12, 2011
Et cetera Meyers sets second World Deaf record Becca Meyers , a rising junior at Notre Dame Prep, won her second gold medal and set her second meet record Thursday at the World Deaf Swimming Championships in Coimbra, Portugal. It was the second deaf world championships record for Meyers in three days. She lowered her 800-meter freestyle record, finishing in 9minutes, 16.22seconds to defeat Anna Tovsta of Ukraine for the gold. Tovsta finished in 9:26.16. In the qualifying heat Tuesday, Meyers broke the record of 9:31.76 set in 2007 by Kristin Ates of the United States.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2011
University of Maryland, Baltimore County, the defending champion in the "World Series" of college chess, finished second in the most recent tournament. UMBC placed second in the Pan American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championships that concluded Dec. 30 in Milwaukee. In its sixth and final match, the team earned a draw against the University of Texas-Brownsville, one of its arch rivals. However, by finishing in the top four, the Retrievers qualify for another prestigious college chess event, the President's Cup, held in April in Tyson's Corner, Va., which is considered the "Final Four" of college chess.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | January 18, 2010
Rick Santos, who spent 50 harrowing hours trapped in a tiny cavern of rubble underneath the Hotel Montana in Haiti, has trouble summing up the impact of the near-death experience on his psyche. "I'm still in a bit of shock right now," said Santos, a normally brisk talker whose voice slowed but didn't quite catch when asked if the ordeal changed him. "I think the full weight of it hasn't hit me. ... I'll deal with it when it comes." But as head of a charitable international health organization based in Maryland, he's already planning a return trip to the poor Caribbean nation and a redoubled aid effort to rebuild its leveled hospital and clinical infrastructure.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | April 6, 2008
The Second World Empires and Influence in the New Global Order By Parag Khanna Random House / 496 pages / $28.95 In the 21st century, according to Parag Khanna, three empires strut their stuff on the world stage. The United States, the European Union and China are "frenemies." Globalization fosters interdependence. But fear and greed continue to drive geopolitical competition. "Arrayed along and sandwiched between" the superpowers, Khanna points out, are Second World countries. Encompassing the world's emerging markets, they are divided between haves and have-nots and may or may not be moving toward democracy.
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2007
INDIANAPOLIS -- Still a year away from the Summer Olympics, coaches, commentators and swimming enthusiasts are already running out of adjectives to describe what Michael Phelps is capable of in the pool. You have to dig deep to capture his latest feat - nearly breaking the world record in an event that wasn't even part of his last Olympic program. "Another Michael moment basically," said Bob Bowman, Phelps' coach with Club Wolverine. Phelps won the 200-meter backstroke last night with a time of 1 minute, 54.65 seconds, less than 0.3 of a second off the world-record pace.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2005
Attention, party animals: Hold the corks and confetti. New Year's Day 2006 will be delayed. The Bureau International des Poids et Mesures in Paris has decreed that one "leap second" will be added to the last minute of this December. The reprieve for the old year will be brief, but enough to give the Earth a chance to spin a bit longer and catch up with humanity's relentlessly exact atomic clocks. Without leap seconds every now and then, high noon would eventually slip to tea time, or even midnight by the clock.
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | February 12, 1991
Until the outbreak of the second World War, enlisted men were essentially nameless and faceless; officers, while entitled to more social respect, were also faceless -- until they reached flag rank, or broke aviation records.You could turn the services upside down and shake them without finding a married man under the rank of sergeant; they were blue-collar workers and, in time of war, cannon-fodder -- in all nations.Until Pearl Harbor, junior officers were forbidden by law to marry for five years after commissioning.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 20, 2003
IN ECONOMICS there's a heads for every tails, a pull for every push, and the happy reciprocal of the Blackout of 2003 will be the purchase of billions of dollars' worth of electrical transmission hardware. Capital projects with 10-figure price tags are what the U.S. economy needs. We have too many factories, too much telephone cable and plenty of office buildings. Business investment has all but dried up as a result, with lugubrious economic effects. What we don't have enough of are wires, switches, circuit breakers, poles and towers for moving electrical power across the land, a situation underscored by the recent northern darkness.
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