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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
My column several weeks ago on the brutal 1956 murder of Myrtle Agnes Bopst brought a flood of emails from people who vividly remembered it. One reader, Turney McKnight, recalled the murder a year later of a Baltimore socialite at the hands of her husband, a lumber executive. After attending a cocktail party June 1, Robert Jett Van Horn, 52, and his wife of two years, Bernice Ward Flynn Van Horn, 53, decided not to spend the night at Eden Hall Apartments at 3401 Greenway, but at Evergreen Farm, their second home, on Falls Road near Shawan in northern Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
The 33-year-old son of a Howard County man on trial for allegedly killing his wife and burying her beneath a backyard shed two decades ago testified through tears on Thursday about waking up on the morning of her disappearance and wandering around the home looking for her. Robert Jarrett III was 10 years old at the time, and it was a morning ritual for his mother, Christine, to wake him and his younger brother. On Jan. 4, 1991, he got up on his own and saw no sign of her. He checked her bed and the garage, and then called his aunt.
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NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
Standing beneath an imposing bronze figure of his father, beside the downtown football stadium that many fans lobbied hard and futilely to have renamed for his father, John C. Unitas Jr. is recalling sweet memories of his dad and the Baltimore Colts. He's lost in a moment, but it's not a touchdown drive. No, in his mind's eye, Unitas Jr. is ball boy again for the Colts - a lad with a beeswaxed crewcut resting in the top bunk in the players' dorm at summer training camp in Westminster with his dad stretched out in the bed below.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
In her historical novels, Annapolis author Erika Robuck invents everyday men and women whose lives intersect with those of acclaimed American authors. She figures that fiction is sometimes the best way of learning something true. "I'm interested in famous writers and how they used the people in their lives," Robuck says. "They take things, and they don't always ask permission. It's such a betrayal. " Robuck's current novel, "Hemingway's Girl," tells the story of Mariella Bennet, a young, half-Cuban housemaid who must negotiate the marital minefield created by Ernest Hemingway and his second wife, Pauline Pfeiffer.
NEWS
September 1, 1994
An article in yesterday's paper about parents paying for their children's college education contained incomplete information about one of the families involved. The article should have noted that Ari and Eric Mossovitz live with their father, Sidney, and his second wife, Sharon, who also have contributed to their support and college education.The Sun regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 22, 1996
OXFORD, ENGLAND -- It's funny how sometimes a single will seem to take on a life of its own.When Radiohead's "Creep" first crept onto the airwaves back in 1993, it took radio listeners completely by surprise. It wasn't just the dry, self-deprecating chorus ("I'm a creep, I'm a loser . . .") that did it; it was also the blast of overdriven guitar that went with each self-flagellating admission. In no time at all, this British quintet began to be known as the "Creep" band.That was fine at the time, but over the years, things have gotten a little, well, creepy.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | December 26, 2006
Released after two nights in City Jail on a contempt of court citation in 1978, a weary James Brown told reporters that he wasn't down on Baltimore. "It just seems I've been given a hard time here," he said. For the legendary singer - one of the flashiest and most dynamic performers of his time - this was an understatement. His performances were banned in the mid-1960s for inciting riots. A downtown motel named after him failed within a year. His second wife, with whom he had two daughters, hailed from Baltimore - where she also divorced him in 1983.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | July 27, 1993
A 50-year-old lab technician admitted in Circuit Court yesterday that he had two wives, but he had little to say and later declined to discuss his situation.Thomas John Cooper, whose addresses are listed as the first block of Fairways Lakes Drive in Dover, Del., where he is now living with his first wife, and the 300 block of Volley Court in Arnold, where he lived with his second, pleaded guilty to bigamy before Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr.Assistant State's Attorney Kathleen Rogers told the court Mr. Cooper was married in New Castle County, Del., in 1965, and married a second time in 1984 in Anne Arundel County without a divorce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 5, 2001
A meddling medium and marriage "Blithe Spirit," Noel Coward's comedy about marriage and a meddling medium, opens tomorrow at the Vagabond Players. Coward's greatest hit, the play focuses on a couple whose wedded bliss is jeopardized when a sM-iance summons up the ghost of the husband's first wife. Under Steve Goldklang's direction, Carol Mason is the medium, Madame Arcati; Dave Gamble is the husband; Katherine Lyons is his second wife; and Melissa Leigh Douglass is the first wife. The set is by Tony Colavito.
NEWS
January 27, 1992
Services for Charles S. Torbeck, a retired sales manager for the Pepsi Cola Co. of Baltimore, will be at 11 a.m. today at Connelly Funeral Home, 300 Mace Ave., Essex.Mr. Torbeck, a Parkville resident who worked at the Key Highway Pepsi plant for 28 years, died Thursday at St. Joseph Hospital of complications from pneumonia. He was 85.His second wife, the former Nina Hamilton, died four days earlier.Mr. Torbeck began his career as a route salesman for the E. H. Koester Bakery in the early 1930s and was later promoted to sales supervisor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
My column several weeks ago on the brutal 1956 murder of Myrtle Agnes Bopst brought a flood of emails from people who vividly remembered it. One reader, Turney McKnight, recalled the murder a year later of a Baltimore socialite at the hands of her husband, a lumber executive. After attending a cocktail party June 1, Robert Jett Van Horn, 52, and his wife of two years, Bernice Ward Flynn Van Horn, 53, decided not to spend the night at Eden Hall Apartments at 3401 Greenway, but at Evergreen Farm, their second home, on Falls Road near Shawan in northern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
Most homes along Claire Road in a middle-class Elkridge neighborhood have a backyard shed, but underneath one of them, authorities say, a family secret has been buried for more than two decades. Robert A. Jarrett, 57, has been charged with murder after what police believe are the remains of his wife, Christine, were found under floorboards and concrete in the shed behind his home. Christine Jarrett vanished in 1991. Police said at the time that she apparently kissed her two children goodbye, took $4,000 and left because of marital problems with her husband of 16 years.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
The hotbed of anxiety and ego that can underlie a theater rehearsal or a routine visit to a doctor's office - that's one of several emotional textures that writer-director Charlie Kaufman (the screenwriter of Being John Malkovich and Adaptation) captures with low-key humor and precision in Synecdoche, New York. Sadly, as the movie rambles along with its own brand of quasi-magical surrealism, the links to real experience grow scarcer and more frayed. In terms of how the scenes move and fit together, everything is a little off, and not in the good way we associate with Kaufman when he is in top form.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | June 15, 2007
Filmmaker Dan Klores' history is a bustle of contradictions. But his life's accidents and choices have made him one of the most skillful and provocative documentarians around. A fan of high shoe-leather journalism, he's empathic and deft at filling in the context of so-called tabloid stories. Klores' Ring of Fire: The Emile Griffith Story, dug into the psychological effects of Griffith's killing Benny "the Kid" Paret in a title boxing match, just as his new film, Crazy Love delves beneath the surface of the bond between Burt Pugach and the woman he scarred for life, Linda Riss.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2007
Gerald Robert "Jerry" Menapace, who rose from president of a local meat cutters union to the second-highest office of the United Food and Commercial Workers International, died of a heart attack Sunday at his Bel Air home. He was 73. Mr. Menapace, also known as "Pal," was born in Atlas, Pa., and graduated from public schools there. He spent four years in the Navy, serving in Africa during the Korean War as a radio operator. When he was discharged, he moved to Baltimore with his wife, the former Lena Griffith, who is deceased.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | December 26, 2006
Released after two nights in City Jail on a contempt of court citation in 1978, a weary James Brown told reporters that he wasn't down on Baltimore. "It just seems I've been given a hard time here," he said. For the legendary singer - one of the flashiest and most dynamic performers of his time - this was an understatement. His performances were banned in the mid-1960s for inciting riots. A downtown motel named after him failed within a year. His second wife, with whom he had two daughters, hailed from Baltimore - where she also divorced him in 1983.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
A memorial Mass for E. Bernard Cooper, a retired postal clerk, will be offered at 10 a.m. today at the Episcopal Church of St. Mary the Virgin, 3121 Walbrook Ave.Mr. Cooper, who was 87 and had lived on Mount Street for many years, died of cancer Dec. 9 at the Calhoun Street home of his daughter.He retired in 1963 after having worked for the postal service since 1924. Earlier, Mr. Cooper had taught elementary school in Baltimore for several years.Born in Baltimore, he graduated from Douglass High School and from what is now Coppin State College.
NEWS
October 15, 1991
Dr. Beverley C. Compton Sr., a retired physician, died Friday at his home in Broadmead after a series of strokes. He was 88.A memorial service for Dr. Compton will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, St. Thomas Lane and Garrison Forest Road, Owings Mills.Born in 1903, Dr. Compton graduated from the Gilman School in 1923 and earned a bachelor's degree in English from Princeton University in 1927. He graduated from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1931.In 1935, he married Cynthia C. Wilson of Chicago.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
A lawyer for John C. Unitas Jr. argued in state appellate court yesterday that the son of the late Baltimore Colt great should be given back the sports marketing and memorabilia company that he alleges was taken from him by his father's second wife and representatives of the Unitas estate. Robert R. Bowie Jr., Unitas Jr.'s lawyer, told a panel of three judges in Maryland's Court of Special Appeals that Unitas Jr. is the rightful owner of the company that he and his father started a dozen years ago. He argued that Sandra L. Unitas, Unitas Sr.'s second wife, and the estate's personal representatives had no authority to take control of the business and vote him out. "What we have here is a remarkable `bull in a china shop' move," Bowie said.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2003
Standing beneath an imposing bronze figure of his father, beside the downtown football stadium that many fans lobbied hard and futilely to have renamed for his father, John C. Unitas Jr. is recalling sweet memories of his dad and the Baltimore Colts. He's lost in a moment, but it's not a touchdown drive. No, in his mind's eye, Unitas Jr. is ball boy again for the Colts - a lad with a beeswaxed crewcut resting in the top bunk in the players' dorm at summer training camp in Westminster with his dad stretched out in the bed below.
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